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Barn Sour ?

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    04-28-2012, 03:56 PM
  #1
Foal
Barn Sour ?

8 weeks ago I purchased, a 4 year old gelding quarter horse for my daughter,
he stared out just fine, she could ride him with no problems, up to a week ago he started having a attitude, and threw her 2 times, the more I read I am thinking he my be testing his new owner ( my daughter ) or he is having a hard time adjusting to his new home or maybe his is getting barn sour. She has been working him in the round pin and some in the paddock, when she left the paddock he took off towards the barn very fast, when she tried to stop him, he slammed on the breaks and she fell off the horse, with her on the ground he remained by her side and did not leave.
So any information what to do next?
     
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    04-28-2012, 05:18 PM
  #2
Yearling
How old is your daughter? If she's old enough she should work him as far as she can away from the buddies, if he wants to go back, go back but work his butt off when they get there. Work him further and further away each day. She should also spend some time with him doing groundwork, and maybe even lunge him by his paddock. Lunge him before he goes in the paddock so that he knows when he goes back it means work, so she's in charge until the last minute. Good luck :).
CarmenL likes this.
     
    04-28-2012, 05:36 PM
  #3
Foal
If being "barn sour" is the issue, try checking out this article:
What Is a Barn Sour Horse? | eHow.com
     
    04-28-2012, 07:46 PM
  #4
Foal
She is 12 years old , I think she is goig to lunge his tomorrow, and give him a work out
     
    04-28-2012, 09:54 PM
  #5
Showing
OP it may be a good idea to find a riding instructor that can work with your daughter on this problem as it can get REALLY out of control and spring up new problems.

Lunging alone won't fix it.. the horse has found a loop hole and is exploiting it. This requires an attitude adjustment that only a trainer can assist with safely, IMOP.

How is your daughter confidence wise? How long has she been riding? How long have you owned this horse? Does this horse have training?
     
    04-28-2012, 10:42 PM
  #6
Started
I am of the opinion, based on the age of your child plus the fact that she has been thrown twice now, that the horse needs to find a new home pronto.

Your daughter is way too young to have to deal with something like this, if she is not already a very tough rider.

You have had this horse just the right amount of time for it to decide that your child cannot control it, and that it doesn't have to do anything it doesn't want to.

And much of this can be attributed to the horse attitude, of "no I don't want to" rather than barn sour, or adjustment problems.

And too, if you or your daughter are babying this horse, or dealing with it in any other manner but very dominant and firmly? This is the type of thing that results from that handling.

Very rarely have I seen a 4 year old that I would have entrusted a child with. They are out there, but very rare. If a child has grown up in horsey family, and by that I mean parents that are trainers, or very well versed in horses, then a 4 year old might work, depending on horse and child too. But as a rule?

Nope. No way.

I just would not risk this anymore. Not worth the headaches. And sure not worth the hospital costs, or the funeral expenses either. Too many decent horses out there to mess around with this one.

Get some lessons especially on handling horses, from a good trainer, that is not going to overhorse your child when you look to buy, (and those types are out there), and then find a horse that is a little older, and less likely to try things.

But again, a horse can be ruined by someone babying them, or by a human behaving in a submissive manner.
arrowsaway likes this.
     
    04-28-2012, 10:50 PM
  #7
Showing
I was riding a little gelding that would get about 20' from the barn and try to head back. Usually it took all my skills to push him on as he'd buck and rear until we got to a certain point then he'd settle down and was fine. This went on for many days without getting any better. One day the rearing got particularly bad, not that he was getting dangerously high but just wouldn't keep all fours on the ground. He then tried running backward to the door. I yelled at my gal friend, actually to get the door closed but she'd grabbed the lunge whip and wrapped it around his back legs and it gave him a good snap. I felt him lurch then he walked out of the yard as nice as you please. That was the end of that issue. Never had a speck of resistance when it came to leaving the yard alone. I'm not saying this is the way to stop this behaviour but it was getting to be him or me.
     
    04-28-2012, 10:51 PM
  #8
Super Moderator
I am very worried about your daughter and her safety. I am afraid that you have over-mounted her way beyond her ability and experience.

While the 4 year old may have been started correctly, he cannot be nearly seasoned enough to carry a green rider without becoming very spoiled. This is only going to get worse.

She has been set up to completely lose her confidence and is very likely to get injured or at the least, develop a great fear of riding.

I have spent a lifetime, not only finding appropriate mounts for young riders (this is not one), but trying to help middle aged people that had started out loving riding but were over-mounted, thrown and lost all interest for many years. It is very difficult to get any of that confidence back when it has been shaken to its core.

A young horse, like this 4 year old, is not solid enough to be 'forgiving' enough to help a green rider out. This takes an old 'been there - done that' kind of horse. We love to put young riders on retired or semi-retired old show horses or old ranch horses. This is not just a matter of a horse 'trying' her; it is a matter of a horse that is still learning and she is in no position to interrupt the wrong behavior and encourage the right behavior. She is sitting up there just hoping for the best.

If it were me, I would send her horse out to a trainer to be straightened out and sold to an appropriate buyer and then ask the trainer to find a 10 year old + solid gelding that can teach her -- along with the trainer teaching her -- how to ride and handle a horse correctly. If you don't, she will give up or get hurt with this young horse. I have just seen it happen over and over -- way too many times.
Skyseternalangel and mind like this.
     
    04-28-2012, 10:58 PM
  #9
Foal
The last two posters have given the best advice fortunately/unfortunately. I've just passed my old trail cob buddy on to my daughter and grandchildren to learn on. I'm amazed how calm and forgiving he is with them now. I always considered he was a bit like the horse version of a Jack Russel terrier, cute and very naughty! He seemed to have matured beyond that and is happy to have the care and attention of a 'job' again.
     
    04-29-2012, 03:34 PM
  #10
Foal
Thanks for all your post, I don't think there is any way I could get rid of this horse, she is in love with him, I am worried about her safety!
She does not want to give up on him, so I am going to get a trainer to help her with these issues, maby they can grow together once more trust is extablished.
     

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