the barn sour horse
 
 

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the barn sour horse

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  • Horse becoming barn sour? tries to run for home
  • How to handle a barn sour horse

 
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    11-02-2009, 08:51 AM
  #1
Banned
the barn sour horse

This post stems from my other post. Rather then keep mixing up the other post I will run a seperate post on the barn sour horse

Quote:
Originally Posted by paint gurl 23    
I personally can have my horse do anything without any "tools". Ya its called training! How does spurs become necessary for a barn sour horse? Rearing isnt because they want to get out of work, if your horses rear baby or not, you are doing something wrong...its that simple. .

Here is your chance paintgurl. How would you or anyone handle a barn sour horse.

A little history
The horse is somewhere between 8 and 10. It is a sucessfull eventer owned and ridden by a girl in her mid 20's. She has owned this horse forever, not a new acquisition.
Suddenly the horse started to act up when she went for simple rides to the back of the property.
The horse would be walking along, maybe 100 or so yards from the barn and then suddenly out of the blue twirl around and break into a run for home. When she attempted to pull him up he would rear, frightening her, causing he to release him. He would immediately lung forward for home. She would end up getting off and walking him home.
This went on for some time so much to her regret she decided to sell him.
I voluntered to break him of the habit.
How would you go about breaking this habit?????

You do get to use tools to make it easier.
     
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    11-02-2009, 10:50 AM
  #2
Showing
I'd still make him go away from the barn. If you are scared to do it in saddle - get off and walk him away from barn from ground till the point he'll calm down. Letting him going back is the worst thing to do IMO.
     
    11-02-2009, 10:51 AM
  #3
Weanling
I would get off and start lunging the horse away from home. Letting him go home is the last thing I would do haha. Getting his mind focused on a job getting it done, then after he has settled a little bit, reward him and go home.

I would also not just 'go home' untack and throw him back where ever. I would also work more at home getting it in his mind that home means work. Instead of just hoping off and putting him away. I would leave him tied and work around him (like sweeping the floors and other barn chores).

Kicking and spuring is just a harsher way and getting a horses mind back on you. You can make him come back to you by making him work hard and 'doing a job'.

If a horse throws a fit, let him do it.... act like it was nothing once he looks at you for a reaction and go on doing whatever you were doing. If you don't feed to his attitude (and yes fear does), then he will learn that throwing a fit just means more work.
     
    11-02-2009, 11:11 AM
  #4
Started
Put him to work by the barn, either on the ground with a lungeline and stick or under saddle. Work him until he is asking to rest, then trot away from the barn, stop at the 100 or so yards point (from the original problem), and allow the horse to catch his breath and rest on a loose rein/lead, FACING AWAY FROM THE BARN. If the horse chooses to try to get back to the barn before I ask, I would allow him to do so at a reasonable pace (as in, a brisk trot), using circles to control that speed to aviod a rear reaction, and then work the tar out of him when we reach the barn again, offering rest away from and facing away from the barn.
     
    11-02-2009, 11:23 AM
  #5
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
I'd still make him go away from the barn. If you are scared to do it in saddle - get off and walk him away from barn from ground till the point he'll calm down. Letting him going back is the worst thing to do IMO.
I agree, He should not have been brought back to the barn. I did watch a few times out the window and he would end up going straight up and the lady would end up getting off time and time again
She was at her wits end.
     
    11-02-2009, 11:26 AM
  #6
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedRoan    
I would get off and start lunging the horse away from home. Letting him go home is the last thing I would do haha. Getting his mind focused on a job getting it done, then after he has settled a little bit, reward him and go home.

I would also not just 'go home' untack and throw him back where ever. I would also work more at home getting it in his mind that home means work. Instead of just hoping off and putting him away. I would leave him tied and work around him (like sweeping the floors and other barn chores).

Kicking and spuring is just a harsher way and getting a horses mind back on you. You can make him come back to you by making him work hard and 'doing a job'.

If a horse throws a fit, let him do it.... act like it was nothing once he looks at you for a reaction and go on doing whatever you were doing. If you don't feed to his attitude (and yes fear does), then he will learn that throwing a fit just means more work.
Again I agree. Getting off and taking him home was the worst thing she could do. I don't know her riding level but she did compete in cross country on him and I assumed was doing well.
I mainly only saw the tears, the flustration afterwards.
     
    11-02-2009, 11:28 AM
  #7
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scoutrider    
Put him to work by the barn, either on the ground with a lungeline and stick or under saddle. Work him until he is asking to rest, then trot away from the barn, stop at the 100 or so yards point (from the original problem), and allow the horse to catch his breath and rest on a loose rein/lead, FACING AWAY FROM THE BARN. If the horse chooses to try to get back to the barn before I ask, I would allow him to do so at a reasonable pace (as in, a brisk trot), using circles to control that speed to aviod a rear reaction, and then work the tar out of him when we reach the barn again, offering rest away from and facing away from the barn.
Funny but I saw very little of her using the arena. The only time I seemed to see her was when she was heading out only to return in a very short time. He arena time seemed to be nil
     
    11-02-2009, 11:41 AM
  #8
Weanling
LOL. I like how you put me on the spot riosdad, is this so you can bash me some more? First of all, in my experience, horses don't just suddenly become barn sour. Things lead up to the behaviour. Most horses are followers, not leaders, they want to have a leader. If you don't take the time to earn there respect then why should they trust in you to keep them safe in the big scary world? Horses will often test their limits, and if they succeed in refusing to leave the property once, then chances are high they will provide a battle every single time you try to leave the property. Before you know it, you have a barn sour horse on your hands. More often than not we are responsible for creating this in the first place. So how would I handle this particular horse? And no Riosdad, I wouldnt use tools..lol...just to amuse you. There is usually two reasons a horse is barn sour. Either he doesnt see you as the alpha or he is just flat out stubborn and gotten away with too much leading up to this. This doesnt mean just undersaddle either. I wouldnt be attempting to ride this horse out knowing he does this because why would I want to put myself in that position and set the horse up for failure? I would be removing outside riding altogether and going back to the basics on the ground to establish a bond and have the horse realize that I am the one that is in control always, in any situation. Earning a horse's respect is far easier on the ground than the back of a horse, not to mention far less dangerous. Again, no spurs or whips! Just knowledge *gasp* wow eh?
Some horses just simpy cannot be broke of this habit if its that extreme so she may have made the right decision selling him if she doesnt have the experience to fix it. No barn sour case is an easy fix, its not one of those things you can just hop on someone horse and he will listen, well maybe to you riosdad, because you wear spurs..lol..
I would honestly be afraid if you were to help this horse riosdad, simply because this isnt a horse you could wear spurs on, you would just multiply the problem times a million. Im not saying that if my horse was to ever run home on me that I would just pack er in and put him away, there is steps that need to be taken so he knows that was unacceptable but getting on him isnt always an option if the rider has got hurt.
     
    11-02-2009, 11:44 AM
  #9
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiosDad    
Funny but I saw very little of her using the arena. The only time I seemed to see her was when she was heading out only to return in a very short time. He arena time seemed to be nil
Sorry, but what did my post have to do with an arena? I've used the same kind of method in the arena with gate sour horses, but it has worked well on the trail, too.

Sorry if I'm just misunderstanding your post.
     
    11-02-2009, 11:50 AM
  #10
Trained
I dealt with this every spring with my 3 horses growing up. They were completely barn sour. Basically they'd get about a mile away from home and refuse to move an inch forward. If I asked they'd spin, back-up, rear, and basically do anything to avoid moving forward.

So what did I do? I made them go forward. We "fought" I guess you could call it. I didn't beat them, but yes I kicked them hard and basically forced them to go forwards. I had this battle once a year with each of the 3 horses. Once it went on for a good 45 mins, but by the end of it she was walking calmly forward and when I turned home she walked slowly and calmly back. After our annual battle royal it didn't happen again until next spring.

The only reason this happened every spring was that I was not allowed to ride off property (which meant out of the pasture) from deer season until spring each year. So the horses got very barn sour.

Now I've dealt with Soda on this repeatedly. I've done the groundwork and the back and forth and the ponying with the other horse. All of the "nicer" ways. Partly because I'm not as strong of a rider as I was and partly because I am trying to learn how to "train" my horse the proper way. But basically I've been dealing with this just about every single time we go out alone.

Sometimes I wonder if it wouldn't do both of us a hell of a lot of good just to have a good old fashioned "battle." It seemed to work pretty good with the others...
     

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