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Best Breed for therapy?

This is a discussion on Best Breed for therapy? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        09-24-2009, 08:01 AM
      #21
    Yearling
    I agree its all in temperment. Any breed could do really.

    Around here a lot of our STBs are donated to places like that after they are done racing. Whats good about that is these horses have been everywhere and seen just about everything so most of them are very level headed and bombproof (though as someone else said there is exceptions to everything).
         
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        09-25-2009, 12:32 AM
      #22
    Trained
    Fjords are by far one of the best breeds for the job. They are a more laid-back breed, they are shorter, better for mounting, and for any sidewalkers that have to support the rider so they aren't reaching way up to the sky, and because they are stouter and are able to carry more weight than say, an Arab of the same height.

    Now that's not saying Fjords are the only choice. I worked at a terapy barn for about 8 years. We had two Fjords, a POA, a curly, a few QH's, a few TB's, a few Arab's, a welsh pony, a shetland, and a Arab/Welsh/QH cross. All the horses were amazing at their job, and they all had a special niche for what they taught the best. Reo, the curly, was a great beginner horse. He's plod along around the arena, and you really had to chase him into a trot, so it was never a concern that a person would get to hard asking for a walk and getting a trot. Torben, one of the Fjords, was great with the Autistic. His walk was so roly poly that it provided the right amount of stimulation to keep his riders focused. Lacey, the other Fjord, was a great horse to trot on, because it was so flat and slow, you could have never trotted before and still sit it with a cup of hot coffee in your hands. Spencer, one of the TB's, was a great horse for the more advanced. He was a school master, he taught his riders how to ride. The arab's were great for emerging indepent riders.

    So yes, temperament is what it all comes down to, but I know of several therapy barns that try and aim for Fjords, simply because if they have the right mind, they're da** near perfet for the job. =]
         
        09-27-2009, 10:08 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    I know you really on asked for a breed..but im going to give you my opinion om breed and maybe age...? if its alright.

    I would suggest going to local lesson barns and asking if they have old lesson horses that can't really do lessons anymore. I don't think breed is what you should be looking for but more age and calmness...other than that I would suggest a qh type
         
        09-28-2009, 12:14 AM
      #24
    Trained
    I want to add that age doesn't make or break a therapy horse. The therapeutic barn I worked at had a Fjord as young as four in a class or two a week, as well as an 8 year old Arab who worked in several classes a week. The thing you have to consider when the horses get too up there in age is health and retirement. Truthfully, that ended up being the downfall of my old barn, the horses were either getting to sick to work or were simply too old and had to retire. They couldn't get enough new horses in soon enough to maintain the student load. That, on top of the vet bills for the older horses that were more or less falling apart.
         
        09-28-2009, 09:31 AM
      #25
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by riccil0ve    
    I want to add that age doesn't make or break a therapy horse. The therapeutic barn I worked at had a Fjord as young as four in a class or two a week, as well as an 8 year old Arab who worked in several classes a week. The thing you have to consider when the horses get too up there in age is health and retirement. Truthfully, that ended up being the downfall of my old barn, the horses were either getting to sick to work or were simply too old and had to retire. They couldn't get enough new horses in soon enough to maintain the student load. That, on top of the vet bills for the older horses that were more or less falling apart.

    This is the downside to my suggestion. But it all is totally true.
    What I was trying to say is most likely your not going to have a jumpy crazy old lesson horse. Im not saying its not possible.but pick the old lazy ones ;)
         

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