Biting Yearling
 
 

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Biting Yearling

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  • Yearling keeps biting me
  • Yearling keep going to bite me

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    03-31-2012, 03:55 PM
  #1
Foal
Biting Yearling

Hello, our chincoteague pony recently has started a bad habit of biting everything. He has never been fed treats by hand and he has ground manners. His only issue is his biting. We have no clue how to fix it as I will not hit him because I do not want a head shy pony down the road. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.
     
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    03-31-2012, 04:28 PM
  #2
Green Broke
When is he biting - as in what is prompting the bites, how are you responding to the bites?
     
    03-31-2012, 04:38 PM
  #3
Started
Smacking his nose when he tries to bite you will not make a head shy horse. Just pretend that he "ran into your hand". A head shy horse = a horse who gets hit over the head for no reason. A respectful horse = a horse who gets punished for unwanted behavior. I bet if he bit his momma she would give him a swift stamp... Otherwise he's just going to walk all over you. I've raised a ton of yearlings, and each one that I've bopped has gone on to be respectful of my space, but certainly not head shy. I'd rather teach them manners when they are small and don't kick you back as hard anyway......
     
    03-31-2012, 04:51 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by themacpack    
When is he biting - as in what is prompting the bites, how are you responding to the bites?
He bites straight out of the blue. No one provokes him, we will be standing by his stall and he tries to take a chunk out of you.
     
    03-31-2012, 04:52 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh vair oh    
Smacking his nose when he tries to bite you will not make a head shy horse. Just pretend that he "ran into your hand". A head shy horse = a horse who gets hit over the head for no reason. A respectful horse = a horse who gets punished for unwanted behavior. I bet if he bit his momma she would give him a swift stamp... Otherwise he's just going to walk all over you. I've raised a ton of yearlings, and each one that I've bopped has gone on to be respectful of my space, but certainly not head shy. I'd rather teach them manners when they are small and don't kick you back as hard anyway......
I have bopped him on the nose but he seems to not get the message.
     
    03-31-2012, 04:55 PM
  #6
Green Broke
If he is not getting the message, you are not sending it loudly and clearly enough. I am also quite confused as you said outright you would not hit him for fear of head-shyness, and now you say you have been hitting him?
beau159 likes this.
     
    03-31-2012, 04:56 PM
  #7
Started
Do it harder... lol. If you bop him and he "mouths" afterward, by licking and chomping his lips, then that's the signal that he's learned something. You just have to learn what the right amount of strength is. Some horses are super sensitive and will stop with a little amount, and some horses (like my dead-head), I'll have to bop him hard enough so that he'll physically move his front end away. The trick is if you do it real hard once, they won't do it again. But if you do it too soft several times, they'll think it's a game. Silly yearlings.
     
    03-31-2012, 04:58 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by themacpack    
If he is not getting the message, you are not sending it loudly and clearly enough. I am also quite confused as you said outright you would not hit him for fear of head-shyness, and now you say you have been hitting him?
Sorry, I meant like hitting him anywhere else besides his nose. Because hitting him on the nose for biting does make sense and I haven't hesitated to do so.
     
    03-31-2012, 04:59 PM
  #9
Foal
Keep bopping him in the nose, eventually he'll get it. My now 2 year old gelding use to bite when we were leading him or picking out his feet. I started carrying a crop with me and everytime he tried to bite he'd get wacked in the nose, but I wasnt actually hitting him, I made it seem like he was hurting himself. When we would pick out his feet and he would turn his head around he would get an elbow. They eventually get it. Not only is he young and testing you, but he is probably also teething.
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    03-31-2012, 05:02 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by DutchFeather    
keep bopping him in the nose, eventually he'll get it. My now 2 year old gelding use to bite when we were leading him or picking out his feet. I started carrying a crop with me and everytime he tried to bite he'd get wacked in the nose, but I wasnt actually hitting him, I made it seem like he was hurting himself. When we would pick out his feet and he would turn his head around he would get an elbow. They eventually get it. Not only is he young and testing you, but he is probably also teething.
Posted via Mobile Device
Okay I will continue to bop him. The teething theory is something I toyed around with but I never thought he would bite a human because of it. He has a jolly ball that he is very fond of and loves to throw around.
     

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