Bitless bridle -- good or bad? - Page 2
   

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Bitless bridle -- good or bad?

This is a discussion on Bitless bridle -- good or bad? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

    View Poll Results: Would you use a Bitless Bridle on your horse?
    Definitely Yes! I've tried it and love it! 6 28.57%
    I might give it a try sometime 13 61.90%
    HECK NO!! 2 9.52%
    Voters: 21. You may not vote on this poll

     
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        01-18-2009, 06:07 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mayfieldk    
    getting rid of the bit altogether seems like avoiding the problem, now doesn't it?
    I completely respect your point of view...no need to get snippy here! I hope that's not how it was meant to sound and I just misread...
         
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        01-18-2009, 06:23 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    No no, not snippy!
    Sorry. :)
         
        01-18-2009, 07:50 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Really depends on the horse, some I would never because I need stopping power. Other that all I ever ride in. All you really can do is try it, if you would hack them in a halter and reins then definitely you can ride in because there is some stopping power.
         
        01-18-2009, 10:45 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    My horse was trained and ridden (by inexperienced trail riders!) on a VERY harsh jointed curb. Today after six months of not being ridden, with no groundwork and no special preparations I rode him with a Cook's bitless bridle. He wasn't perfect (he is very gate sour) but he responded well.

    I think that it might be a good idea for you to try Monty Roberts' join-up technique with Sandie. It is groundwork that does not involve riding. It will improve your confidence and trust in one another and strenghen your bond. You only recently aquired Sandie so she is still getting to know you. I am secure in the belief that to truly know your horse you have to work from the ground up.

    Instead of saying "she does this when I ride" You should try turning her loose in a round pen/ring/arena just you and her and watch what she does, how she acts. How does she respond to you? If you walk away does she follow? Does she pay attention to what you are doing? Does she watch you out of the corner of her eye? Does she ignore you?

    How she behaves around you when you are off her back is just as important as how she acts with you up on her.
         
        01-19-2009, 07:07 AM
      #15
    Foal
    I agree with some of the other posters here that the bitted/bitless choice does really depend upon the horse, and on personal preference. If she chomps the bit a lot, you may need to change the type of bit. You can try bitless - maybe it will suit her - but if she does take off, it won't give you much control. You might also want to get her teeth checked, whether you go bitless or not - bitless bridles can still put pressure on the side of the mouth, and this will cause pain if the teeth have any sharp edges on them.

    Also, I wouldn't think that sudden spooking is all down to the bridle, unless she has a big dental problem. It could be just naughtiness, or it could be back/saddle problems, or something else entirely. Sorry if this all sounds a bit vague!
         
        01-19-2009, 08:17 AM
      #16
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by masatisan    
    My horse was trained and ridden (by inexperienced trail riders!) on a VERY harsh jointed curb. Today after six months of not being ridden, with no groundwork and no special preparations I rode him with a Cook's bitless bridle. He wasn't perfect (he is very gate sour) but he responded well.

    I think that it might be a good idea for you to try Monty Roberts' join-up technique with Sandie. It is groundwork that does not involve riding. It will improve your confidence and trust in one another and strenghen your bond. You only recently aquired Sandie so she is still getting to know you. I am secure in the belief that to truly know your horse you have to work from the ground up.

    Instead of saying "she does this when I ride" You should try turning her loose in a round pen/ring/arena just you and her and watch what she does, how she acts. How does she respond to you? If you walk away does she follow? Does she pay attention to what you are doing? Does she watch you out of the corner of her eye? Does she ignore you?

    How she behaves around you when you are off her back is just as important as how she acts with you up on her.
    I actually just joined the Monty Roberts Join Up email newsletter! I have walked around with her in the arena on a few occasions to see what she does. She does follow me around, it's really cute, she's the world's calmest horse on the ground! It's really only when I am riding her that she gets weirded out by the "scary corner" and such...so it has to be either that she doesn't feel that I'm there bc I'm in her blind spot or I'm making her feel insecure or something. I'm more looking at other ways of doing things not necessarily bc SHE needs them, but more or less because if I use another way, I will feel better and maybe calm myself down a bit! Haha
         
        01-19-2009, 08:31 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    On MY horse, I don't think I would just yet. Give us another year and I think I would try it, but right now... We're still training and he has a hard enough time collecting himself as it is. On most of my trainer's horses, though, I definitely would.
         

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