bitless bridles/ riding in a headstall - Page 2
 
 

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bitless bridles/ riding in a headstall

This is a discussion on bitless bridles/ riding in a headstall within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        09-10-2007, 12:21 PM
      #11
    Foal
    Oh Kitten, don't get me started about mechanical hackamores. I would love to ride a beginner with one.

    Maybe it is best for me to slowly back out and keep mouth closed.
         
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        09-10-2007, 02:44 PM
      #12
    Showing
    He-he... Being honest with you I used to ride in one (for short period of time with very short shanks and wide padded nose). Of course I did ride with full owner permission (I now she use such things all the time on her horses and she has 25 years of riding/barrel racing etc. experience). But after I got my own the first thing I did was reading what is the best thing to use on her to keep her happy. And after I did read that mech hackamore is very harsh thing to use I never even tried one since that on any horse.
         
        09-10-2007, 06:49 PM
      #13
    Foal
    I tried riding my horse in a halterr with the leadrope round his neck and tied back on to the halter (i've got a 12ft rope) for the first time today. I've never trusted him enough to do it before, he can be really silly and spooky.

    He was brilliant though! I do alot of ground work with him so he was really responsive, I think he goes better than with a bit! He's really soft in a headcollar but with his bit he's always fighting with it.

    I think i'll try it more now. :)
         
        09-10-2007, 06:49 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Oops, pressed the button twice ..
         
        09-11-2007, 06:26 PM
      #15
    Foal
    You just reminded me of how I have tested some horses to see if they will take to a side pull.
    I was coming off the ridge and was in a steep narrow part of the trail, Bowie was fighting his bit as always and moving much to fast so I reached and grabbed the lead rope and pulled his halter in on his nose and he slowed down and did what ever I asked from the lead. When I got back to the ranch I put him in a side pull and we did the two hour ride all over again. His attitude calmed down and for the first time we had a very sane ride.
         
        09-22-2007, 03:25 PM
      #16
    Foal
    If you have a very trustworthy horse then you could probably use just a halter and lead line for everyday fun. As for bit less bridles, I've used them plenty of times. I don't really have a preference about them. I think you should try one out on your horse and see how they do. It's best just to use the type of bridle/bit your horse works best in.
         
        09-30-2007, 09:25 PM
      #17
    Foal
    It doesn't matter what you use. It depends on how far along your hrose is when it comes to collection and softness through the poll, jaw, neck and nose. If you work with your horse alot on these things and he is extremely sensitive to it on the bit you use, then it is safe to graduate to a halter or hackamore. Once the horse is sensitized to pressure and willing to obey, there is no need for worry in a halter. Some horses will catch on right away, some may take a couple rides, because the pressure is being applied elsewhere. If your horse is cued with neck-rein and/or leg cues, then the previous sentence may be ignored.

    Ya'll keep talking about trust. Some people trust their horses 100% but they have never taught their horses to be soft through the jaw and such. This is also a key role in using a hackamore. If your horse tends to buck or run away with you, no I do not suggest using a hackamore/halter for riding.

    Some people have a deep hatred towards bits, which, in reality, and I am sorry, is stupid. The bits are not the problem, it is the people. If an experienced horse-man on a good broke horse (obviously it makes no sense to use such a bit on a green horse) used a "cruel" bit on a horse, he could do extremely well with it. Somebody who is unexperienced and/or riding a horse that is green or ignorant towards the issue of softness all through the poll, jaw, and nose, then I would not recommend use of a harsh bit. A 'Tom Thumb', Ring Snaffle, or any other short-shanked broken mouth piece is always a good way to go.

    It is difficult to tell people what bit, saddle, or other equipment to use. It all depends on the rider and horse.
         

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