bitting trouble
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

bitting trouble

This is a discussion on bitting trouble within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Bit for horse that chucks her head in the air and takes hold while jumping
  • Problems bitting a horse

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By blue eyed pony

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    02-16-2013, 04:42 PM
  #1
Foal
bitting trouble

Hi, I own a horse who is 9 (believed to be no older than 6) that is a real pain when it comes to putting a bridle on. Today I was wrestling with him for 45 minutes until he eventually gave up and took his bit, it took 3 of us. He chucks his head up in the air (he's 16.3 & im only 5ft 6!) and he holds it there untill we manage to tickle his chin down. He's currently in a hard rubber pelham, after the dentist wasnt happy that he was in a waterford gag. He's been a little bit better behaved, but no vast improvement. We are thinking of taking him back to basics and retraining him. But what bit is best? I was going to use a mouthing bit with keys, because he likes to get on the bit when ridding and he is CONSTANTLY napping. But people have said no, use a snaffle... Need opinions as he is quite the handful! Anythings helpful!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    02-17-2013, 01:00 AM
  #2
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by pheohamish    
hi, I own a horse who is 9 (believed to be no older than 6) that is a real pain when it comes to putting a bridle on. Today I was wrestling with him for 45 minutes until he eventually gave up and took his bit, it took 3 of us. He chucks his head up in the air (he's 16.3 & im only 5ft 6!) and he holds it there untill we manage to tickle his chin down. He's currently in a hard rubber pelham, after the dentist wasnt happy that he was in a waterford gag. He's been a little bit better behaved, but no vast improvement. We are thinking of taking him back to basics and retraining him. But what bit is best? I was going to use a mouthing bit with keys, because he likes to get on the bit when ridding and he is CONSTANTLY napping. But people have said no, use a snaffle... Need opinions as he is quite the handful! Anythings helpful!
I have only used snaffle bits on my horses, I have four of my own and one boarded here that also has a snaffle bit.
I used to have a horse here that would put his head high in the air while bridling and how I fixed him was I got a step stool and then I could reach him LOL eventually he gave up and then I had no problems with him bridling......I would also start him with groundwork, get him respecting you and listening to you......it's surprising how groundwork makes a world of difference in horses....
     
    02-17-2013, 01:07 AM
  #3
Weanling
French-link snaffle is my go-to bit most of the time. I have rarely heard of a horse who didn't like it!

I think that you might want to try a few different things with this horse, including basic respect & ground work. Try putting soft but consistent pressure on his poll until he gives to it-- even if it's only an inch! Release & praise. I trained my gelding so that if I place a hand on his poll and apply pressure, he will lower until I release the pressure. Doing this kind of pressure-release exercise might be helpful.
     
    02-17-2013, 01:10 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
Constantly napping? Do you mean chewing the bit, or do you mean throwing his head around? Jigging, or dancing around or bucking or ?

I mean, is this behavior related to the bit or just his expression of unwillingness to move forward, or too much anxiety (jigging) or?
     
    02-17-2013, 01:16 AM
  #5
Foal
Personally Myler bits are the best, admittedly expensive but they have one with 3 independent rollers in the middle of the bit, creating a great rolling action.
In terms of his head always up, before you bring the bridle to his face stick your right arm over the top of his head and between his ears (may need to desensitise him first) then pass the bridle from your left hand to your right. Your right arm should be an effective aid against his poll to keep his head down, it then leaves your left hand free to shove a thumb into his mouth at the same time and slip the bit right in.
Other wise maybe put his bridle on while you are standing on a bench, so even if he shoves his head up, you are already there!
     
    02-17-2013, 01:30 AM
  #6
Trained
If you can find it somewhere on the internet, this will help you a LOT. John Lyons bridling, poll lowering training. Years ago, he wrote a series of articles for Horse & Rider magazine, those techniques were part of the series. I was brought a very hard to bridle filly to train. I followed the instructions and within 10 to 15 minutes, she was lowering her poll and taking the bit, all calm. Ever since then I use those techniques. Hard to write it out all on here, but try find his instructions, were so easy to follow and great success.
     
    02-17-2013, 05:26 AM
  #7
Foal
By napping, I mean he's got his head down, & when you pull it up its a matter of seconds before its down again, he likes to buck, run out at things, head shakes. I'm going to look into poll pressure & see if that does anything for us, I'll look into roller bits & see what they're like, I personally don't think a snaffle would work, we wanted to put him back in one when we got him, but he just walked all over me!
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    02-17-2013, 08:02 AM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by pheohamish    
got his head down, & when you pull it up its a matter of seconds before its down again, he likes to buck, I'm going to look into poll pressure & see if that does anything for us
DO NOT put poll pressure on a bucker! You will make it a thousand times worse, I promise you it is the worst idea out. That includes all gags, all curbs, anything that isn't a snaffle. If it has leverage, it has poll pressure. And poll pressure encourages the head to drop, which is the opposite of what you want.

The bucking, can you stay on it and remain balanced? If so, PUSH HIM FORWARD. Bridge your reins against his neck so he can't get his head down, and push him forwards. The best thing you can do for buckers is to ride through it.

Your bit does not have to be a plain snaffle. I personally will never put anything twisted in my horse's mouth but slow twist is an option, or a Dr Bristol. Try a thin smooth snaffle, even.

Training is key here. This horse has some BIG holes in his training which need to be fixed. Try remouthing him, or if you don't know how, send him to a trainer. I can't reiterate this enough - TRAINER TRAINER TRAINER. If you don't know how to fix a problem properly, you have to be willing to find someone who DOES.

99.99% of "horse" problems are actually rider problems, either current or past. My gelding for example once had a reputation for being "extremely strong, dirty and dangerous" but he's exactly the opposite, he just can't cope with heavy hands or riders who don't use their seat. Monty is incredibly soft, honest, and safe, for a rider who uses hand only as a last resort and is able to ride with a light following contact or a looping rein. [BUT, he does need a rider who CAN be quite er, firm with their hands, to back up their seat/light hand aids, because he CAN be a wee bit strong at times... but he's certainly not dirty or dangerous. As much as necessary but as little as possible is the approach that works best with him.]

So. Trainer, coach, TRAINING. Get him back in a snaffle.
Jacqua Stud likes this.
     
    02-17-2013, 09:51 AM
  #9
Showing
I would put this horse in a D ring snaffle or loose ring as both bits have a smaller diameter than an eggbutt. The bits you have been using my be too thick for him. When a horse gets like this I resort to clicker/treat training.Try this with just the bit, no bridle. I will just hold the bit inviting him to sniff it. When he does, I will make a cluck sound and offer a small reward. This graduates to him touching it. I will then put my finger in the corner of his mouth and feel his tongue, which may feel hard. I will wiggle my finger until his tongue moves and maybe he opens his mouth a little. C/t. By now he will be trying to figure out how to get the click and reward. Don't advance until you can put your finger in and he starts to mouth. C/t each time. Only then do you set the bit in his mouth. It doesn't have to be perfect as you are going to immediately remove it c/t. Be sure to allow him to let go of it.Do this a dozen times rewarding each time then put him away and leave him alone as that is a huge reward as it removes all pressure. The next time repeat the entire exercise from start to finish altho it won't take as long. Another way of rewarding is to back away a few steps then turn your back to him and wait a minute. Behind your back he will be working his jaw as he relaxes.
     
    02-17-2013, 09:58 AM
  #10
Green Broke
How does his tack fit?

I would start a horse like this over.. from the ground work right on up. Some holes in this horse's foundation have led to a bad perfrormance over all. You listed all the evasions. Head down, difficult to bridle, bucking, runing out, shaking his head...Evasions come about from being asked for too much too soon.

I used to get horses like this (rescues). I just started over as if they had never been ridden. I never knew where the hole in the foundation was, so I got an excavator and built a new one from the footings on up.
     

Tags
behaviour, bitting, tack

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bit's and Bitting Jumping4Fun Horse Tack and Equipment 4 11-26-2012 04:24 AM
Trouble with bitting strong horse with a sensitive mouth kindewind Jumping 8 11-16-2012 08:47 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0