Bolting?!
 
 

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Bolting?!

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  • Mares in season bolting
  • Pony bolting in season

 
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    01-22-2011, 07:50 AM
  #1
Weanling
Angry Bolting?!

I was wondering what else Lola could do to terrify me. Well I know now! Bolting! She has never done it before in the 4 months I have owned her. She can of course be a bit fresh sometimes and want to canter but she has never galloped around the arena and refuse to stop. The only way she will stop is at the gate!

Yesterday I rode her. I walked her for a few laps then trotted her. She did try to canter at the corners but I did not let her. Then I eventually cantered and she took off into a full blown gallop! She then nearly ran me into a wall and the gate. I could not stop her at all! And I know when horses do that you pull then release but I could not even think so I was constantly pulling. Maybe that is why she would not stop.

There is one corner she always tries to take off in. No matter what direction we are going. Then there is one side she always canters faster. That has been going on since I got her. But yesterday she galloped at the corners and down that side then slowed down a bit on the other side. I cantered her in circles and she was still as high as a kite.

So what would make her do that? Could she be in season? Or maybe it is the new hard feed I got her? There are no oats in it but there is sugar. The thing about that is I had not given her it for a week. So that should not have made her crazy.

It is not just her that is gone mad. There are two other ponies who have started bolting, rearing and threatening to buck. Both are mares.

I have been told she is fighting the bit that is why I cannot stop her.

But I have no idea why she did it..Any help please =)
     
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    01-22-2011, 09:17 AM
  #2
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarahandlola    
I was wondering what else Lola could do to terrify me. Well I know now! Bolting! She has never done it before in the 4 months I have owned her. She can of course be a bit fresh sometimes and want to canter but she has never galloped around the arena and refuse to stop. The only way she will stop is at the gate!

Yesterday I rode her. I walked her for a few laps then trotted her. She did try to canter at the corners but I did not let her. Then I eventually cantered and she took off into a full blown gallop! She then nearly ran me into a wall and the gate. I could not stop her at all! And I know when horses do that you pull then release but I could not even think so I was constantly pulling. Maybe that is why she would not stop.

There is one corner she always tries to take off in. No matter what direction we are going. Then there is one side she always canters faster. That has been going on since I got her. But yesterday she galloped at the corners and down that side then slowed down a bit on the other side. I cantered her in circles and she was still as high as a kite.

So what would make her do that? Could she be in season? Or maybe it is the new hard feed I got her? There are no oats in it but there is sugar. The thing about that is I had not given her it for a week. So that should not have made her crazy.

It is not just her that is gone mad. There are two other ponies who have started bolting, rearing and threatening to buck. Both are mares.

I have been told she is fighting the bit that is why I cannot stop her.

But I have no idea why she did it..Any help please =)

When I first adopted my horse, he did exactly this, constantly so I feel for you. What kind of feed is she getting? Can you possibly get a feed without so much sugar in it?

Can you try lunging her in a round pen before getting on her? Let her get all her energy out so, when you bring her into the arena she won''t even think about doing that. When she does that use the one rein stop! Pull her head towards you and let her go in a circle until she gives up, than try going at a walk, than trot. Don't let her canter until you want her too and if you feel her trying to grab the bit, circle her again. Don't let her get away with that.

What kind of bit do you have her in? Maybe it's her teeth? You might want to even have a chiro come out if you can and get her checked. Is the saddle pinching her? It could be so many things. Do some stretching exercises with her. Take your inside rein and pull her nose to the left and when she releases and puts her head down, let go and give her pat. Than do the same thing but, pull her nose to the right, when she releases and puts her head down and gives you the bit, let go and give her a pat. But, when you are getting ready to release pressure on the reins and she pulls on the bit like "give me my head", grab that rein again and do it again. Don't let her get away with anything.

You might also, want a trainer to come in and watch you and help you with that.

Good luck! :)
     
    01-22-2011, 09:27 AM
  #3
Trained
Bolting can be very scarey, and I am glad that you are ok, and that your mare did finally stop. Bolting can happen for any numerous reasons, you'll just have to try to elminate each cause, to find your answer.

She could of spooked, she could be in pain *saddle, back, etc, etc*, too hot to trot and needs energy released, rider could be too loud while in the saddle, etc, etc, etc.

With the stopping, it's hard to think when something drastic like this is happening, but if you can work with yourself to remember what to do in situations like this, then you can nip it in the butt quicker.

I used to ride a lovely TB Gelding when I was a Working Student, and he loved to be frisky. That included crow hopping while out hacking and moving very forward, and at times, when he found an excuse, he thoroughly enjoyed bolting :P What I like to use is the "Eventers One Rein Stop" - I'm not talking about the common One Rein Stop that you see many do, where the horses head gets pulled around to where their nose is touching the riders toes......I personally do not like that particular approach, because I fear the horse is going to topple over while at high speeds.

What I was taught, was a different approach, and it works pretty good, and I feel safer doing it this way, personally. You have to teach yourself on how to grab the reins quickly. This is where you take the reins in one hand, while you quickly slide the free hand up its rein to make it quite shorter.

So, say you are riding your mare, and she takes off. Get yourself balanced, weight into your heels, over your feet, solidify yourself - then take your reins into your right hand and quickly slide your left up its rein. Once you get the rein in a short enough length, dig your left knuckles into your horses mane while gripping that rein as tight as you can, without compromising. And then take your right arm while gripping the right rein and bring your hand up towards your shoulder.

That puts the breaks on quickly.

When Nelson gets really "on the bit" I do a lot of different things with him, to get him thinking and back on what I am asking him to do, instead of what is around him or the weather or whatever it is that is causing him to be spunky.

Circles, Serpentines - never any strait lines. I do these with TONS of transitions involved. I try to stay quiet and relaxed while on his back, no tensing, no gripping, while I just keep his mind activated on the task at hand.

I hope you can figure this out!
     
    01-22-2011, 05:24 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
Well, a couple of things are at play here.

1) Your horse is feeling good. More feed, less riding in the winter and being 'fresh' requires a better trained horse than one that is less fit. If a horse is well trained and responsive, it should make no difference. Too much 'prosperity' sure brings out the 'holes' in any horse's training.

2) You have 'holes' in your training. Your horse lacks respect for your rein and leg aids. While a horse may be feeling too good or may not be getting enough riding, you need to learn the difference between a reason and an excuse. There really are no excuses here. Anyone that has to longe a horse before riding is using exercise to replace training. A well trained horse can be taken out, tacked up, stepped on and ridden anywhere. Anything less is catering to a horse that either is not trained well enough or has its rider trained.

My suggestion would be to teach your horse to do a very good 'one rein stop'. If you teach a horse to stop dead still (not move it feet at all) and willingly give you its head either direction, you always have an 'emergency brake' that you can use any time a horse acts like it is going to get out of control. If it acts really obnoxious (like a big hump in its back and threatening to buck) you can add a disengagement of the horse's hind quarters which not only stops the horse but takes his power away as well.

This maneuver must be taught before you need it. The horse must be taught to give you its head when it is quiet and under total control. It must be taught to stop and give you its head at the walk, trot and canter. If it is running full speed, it is too late. I have never seen an adequately schooled horse that did not stop and give its head when it first tries to bolt if the rider takes its head away when it first thinks about doing something out of control.

If you do not understand how to train a horse to give you its head, let me know and I will reprint an article I wrote explaining exactly how this is done and how it is best used.
     
    01-22-2011, 05:48 PM
  #5
Weanling
Thanks guys!

I forget to say her tack all fits. She had a saddle a few weeks ago that did not fit. She would buck and back up etc. Ever since I changed her saddle she has not bucked or backed up at all. I changed saddles about 2 weeks ago.

I felt all over for pain and she doesn't seem to be in any but I will get someone else to check her out..

She was getting a prep and condition feed but I changed it to cool mix. Maybe it was the change of feed?

I am using a dutch gag on her on the second ring. Her teeth were done about 2 months ago.

I don't think she spooked because she did it every time I asked her to canter and usually when she spooks she just kind of jumps away from whatever it is instead of running away XD

I was told it could be because she is feeling good and wants to work! She also does not get much work during the week because I work. But this week she will be worked everyday so I will see if there is a difference. I am not going to give her hard feed until I know it is not that.

She usually goes on the bit at walk and trot but she has started to throw her head in the air again. If she has not been ridden in lets say two days it takes her a few minutes to go back to what we were working on. It is the same with jumping. She has to be jumped over the same jump at least 3 times for her to understand what to so again. She always hesitates the first time she is jumped! I have no idea what to do about that! There is a show coming up and I want her to be able to go in and jump without forgetting what to do.

She was ridden today ( Not by me, I have awful bad nerves but I will probably ride her tomorrow ) and she was running away with him too. Difference is he is not afraid to pull the head of her. I am. For lots of reasons. I am afraid of what she will do and I do not want her to hate me for hurting her. Anyways he jumped her over small jumps to try get some energy out of her and by the end of it she was jumping great and cantering around on the bit... She can be a very odd horse sometimes...
     
    01-22-2011, 06:19 PM
  #6
Super Moderator
Quote:
I am afraid of what she will do and I do not want her to hate me for hurting her.

Read more: Bolting?!
I am afraid this is not understand how they think. She will not get mad at you for making her mind any more than she will like you and want to behave for you if you are nice to her. They like you best and behave best if they they have total respect for you and are made to mind perfectly. That is just how they think and respond.
     
    01-22-2011, 06:58 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
I am afraid this is not understand how they think. She will not get mad at you for making her mind any more than she will like you and want to behave for you if you are nice to her. They like you best and behave best if they they have total respect for you and are made to mind perfectly. That is just how they think and respond.
I agree with those wholeheartedly. Very well said!
     
    01-23-2011, 01:37 AM
  #8
Banned
Lunge her !! It will get the energy out also If she picks up a faster canter don't let her keep her at a slow canter for a while and if she starts to go into a faster canter immediately make her trot
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    01-23-2011, 02:03 AM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIEventer    
What I was taught, was a different approach, and it works pretty good, and I feel safer doing it this way, personally. You have to teach yourself on how to grab the reins quickly. This is where you take the reins in one hand, while you quickly slide the free hand up its rein to make it quite shorter.
So, say you are riding your mare, and she takes off. Get yourself balanced, weight into your heels, over your feet, solidify yourself - then take your reins into your right hand and quickly slide your left up its rein. Once you get the rein in a short enough length, dig your left knuckles into your horses mane while gripping that rein as tight as you can, without compromising. And then take your right arm while gripping the right rein and bring your hand up towards your shoulder.
That puts the breaks on quickly.
I agree with eventer. Don't try to do the "regular" one-rein stop at speed if your horse gets away from you. You hear about the one-rein stop all the time, but when a horse is bolting with you it is immediately obvious that pulling a horse's head around is going to flip your horse right off her feet. It also is impossible to do on a narrow trail. One thing I might add is that if you're holding the left rein very short (along with the horse's mane), you might have to pull the right rein several times to get the horse to slow down and stop.
It sounds like your horse has a lot of energy. I wouldn't try cantering until your horse feels "settled" at the trot. I would trot her for even a half hour and wait until she is not constantly trying to speed up on you. She probably needs to be a little tired and have the edge taken off before she is ready to give you a nice canter.
     
    01-23-2011, 11:06 PM
  #10
Trained
Yes, it's the weather. Horses turn into lunatics and energizer bunnies in cold weather. Cherie already nailed the solution. One rein stop. Teach it before you need to use it. Most horses stop pulling that crap quickly once they know you have that skill in your toolbox. Teach the motion first at the halt, and then do it at the walk, then trot and finally canter. Most horses will stop on a dime as soon as they feel you pick up on the rein. The one rein stop is gold. Learn it and it will save your butt over and over again.
     

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