A Bond Too Strong?
 
 

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A Bond Too Strong?

This is a discussion on A Bond Too Strong? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Working bond not too strong
  • How to deal with horses that bond too strongly

 
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    01-27-2013, 05:56 PM
  #1
Yearling
A Bond Too Strong?

A bit of back story:

Two years ago, my mum bought a ST filly off the track. She had barely been back, but my mum thought with more training she would be a good horse for her. It turned out that that was not the case. Once we Nelly had gained back her lost weight she became the typical energetic three year old. My mum wouldn't even ride her, or let alone work with her. So she gave her to me after she bought an older horse that she felt comfortable working with. I already had my horse to work with and found working both of them to be time consuming and tiring, so we decided to sell Nelly. Because not a lot of people have an interest in Stanardbreds around here it was months before anyone even responded to our ad, which left me lots of time to keep training her. During that time Nell and I bonded so far to the point that she will only do things for me. Everytime someone would come out to see her she would act like a total brat with no manners so no one would want to even consider buying her. We then decided she would probably be happier with us anyway, I sealed the deal by throwing a total fit the last time someone offered to buy her, crying for the entire night, telling my parents we couldn't possibly sell her now So we tried to have a college student come out to ride her with us, but that was just another repeat of when we tried to sell her. She'll only behave with me.

Because I want to start showing her this year, I have to put more training on her this spring and summer, so I was considering taking her to the barn I'm teaching lessons at. That way, I won't be running from township to township to work with my horse at my own barn and then teach lessons at someone else's, I'll also have my coach nearby to help. The only thing I'm concerned about is how she'll be behave being handled by other people when I'm not there. What are some things I can do about the way she acts with other people?
     
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    01-27-2013, 06:01 PM
  #2
Weanling
Does this happen even when someone else lunges her or just riding? If not I'd start with another person working on the ground with her first and get the respect. Also, if you are there with the person and give pointers verbally but do not step in and take over. She's going to need someone who won't back down to her and will follow through with her. Having a few people doing this would be best.
     
    01-27-2013, 06:01 PM
  #3
Started
My mare will act up a bit with others.
Specifically because she's used to how I do things

You have to show her who's boss and eventually she'll behave.

I'd say have more people interact with her.
     
    01-27-2013, 06:07 PM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mochachino    
Does this happen even when someone else lunges her or just riding? If not I'd start with another person working on the ground with her first and get the respect. Also, if you are there with the person and give pointers verbally but do not step in and take over. She's going to need someone who won't back down to her and will follow through with her. Having a few people doing this would be best.
I've only ever seen my old coach lunge her, she acted pretty much the same way she does with me, and the college student I mentioned before tried to lunge her, emphasis on tried, it was a total nightmare. Thanks, I'll see if I can round up some brave souls Should I do that before I move her?
     
    01-27-2013, 06:24 PM
  #5
Weanling
I would, especially if she is going to be handled by other people when she gets there.
     
    01-28-2013, 07:41 AM
  #6
Foal
Yes, you should definitely start having her handled by others, even if that is hiring a trainer to do some basic ground work with her. There are no guarantees in life and should something happen to a horse's owner, a well trained horse who gets along well with people in general is going to have a lot more options than a "one person horse" who is hard to handle.
     
    01-28-2013, 08:23 AM
  #7
Showing
Horses read a lot in the approach and some are quite sensitive to that.
     

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