Boy, I will smack the lazy outta you!
 
 

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Boy, I will smack the lazy outta you!

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    11-01-2012, 06:44 AM
  #1
Foal
Boy, I will smack the lazy outta you!

Thats pretty much what its come to I don't know how, but I sorta came to just accept that Salem is lazy and stubborn with other ppl. I never thought to just fix it. So I decided to use a riding crop and try a little run using it to make him more responsive and to stop trying to break his gaits all the time.
I want to make sure I do this right because I don't want to need this riding crop forever. Would appreciate any tips or advice Thanks
     
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    11-01-2012, 07:11 AM
  #2
Green Broke
Not sure what the real problem is. If he is unresponsive to your leg, and you are a good enough rider, a small spur and a crop immediately behind your leg will help him to become more responsive.

OTOH if the issue is him not moving forward then it could be a number of things. He must be physically sound enough to move forward. If he is relatively green it may be a balance problem and he may need more foundation work. Lots of green horses are afraid to move out with weight on their back. As important is how he is being ridden and the skill level of the rider being able to help him with balance.

Lots of riders (not saying you are one of them) get on a horse and are loose in the saddle and bang the horse in the mouth when they ride.. so the horse is not forward.
     
    11-01-2012, 07:13 AM
  #3
Trained
Make sure you don't nag. If you use it, USE IT, once he moves, back off. Just like leg, clucking, any of that. Ask, tell, demand.
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    11-01-2012, 07:33 AM
  #4
Foal
He moves great if your me or the 3 other girls I know that can make him move (sometimes lazy, as in he breaks the trot and lope a lot unless you catch and correct it immediatly). But when someone who isnt confident and consistent gets on and he gets away with a little resistence, its all over. He's got their number and he aint doin crap The little girl whos been doing lessons on him has come a long way in just five lessons with him but I know there is work to be done here.
     
    11-01-2012, 07:40 AM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans    
Make sure you don't nag. If you use it, USE IT, once he moves, back off. Just like leg, clucking, any of that. Ask, tell, demand.
That was my basic plan. A double click to trot (on the lunge line he knows perfectly well that single click means walk, double means trot ), a little leg pressure and if still nothing, tap behind the leg, if still nothing a little firmer. That should be enough, he does jump right up when he gets a little whack somewhere.
But as far as breaking at the trot/lope should I immediatly correct with the crop or give leg again? I want the breaking to STOP, not be easily corrected by leg pressure, so I thought immediate crop with breaking. Does that sound right?
     
    11-01-2012, 07:44 AM
  #6
Trained
Make sure YOU arent the problem. Say when your loping, make sure that you are not giving him a subtle cue to slow down. A slight shift in your weight, leg, body position could very well be why he is doing this.

If you arent the problem, then BEFORE he breaks, you need to get him moving forward again. YOU need to know he's going to break before HE knows he's going to. Think ahead and push him forward.
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    11-01-2012, 07:46 AM
  #7
Super Moderator
If he is a lesson horse and does not go very well for beginners, just leave him alone. As long as he rides well for you and anyone else that knows how to ride better, he is just 'taking care of' beginner riders. As their skill level comes up, he will ride better for them.

I have 2 old lesson geldings that do this and I would not trade them for anything. They ride alert and forward if a rider knows how to ride even a little. They poke along and take care of beginners and handicapped riders. They suit me just fine.

If you want to keep a horse 'sharp', you have keep beginners off of them and you you cannot give lessons on them.
     
    11-01-2012, 07:52 AM
  #8
Green Broke
Am I understanding that your horse goes well for riders who can ride sort of okay, but doesn't do well for very new riders?
     
    11-01-2012, 08:04 AM
  #9
Green Broke
My Arab is very lazy. He is 26+ yrs now and still a very lazy horse. He is so lazy coming in from pasture at night that Mr. WTW calls him "The Stoner Horse".

He had an injured vertebra when I rescued him 19+ years ago. So injured that he's seen a chiropractor more than I have He now has a nice arthritis bump in the injured area that bothers him.

Is he sandbagging to some degree? I'm sure he is but he's always been extremely well mannered, a great lesson horse for children, leaves them with happy horse memories, so he can sand bag all he wants.

If your horse has not been checked, structurally, I would have a chiro look at him. Anything is possible; horses don't have to be lame or look/act different to have something wrong them with. He may still be lazy after treatments (if he would need them) as it's become a learned habit but at least the real reason for his laziness would be known. He could also be uncomfortable internally, when he breaks out of a trot or canter but he's too much of a gentleman to buck about it

Point being, were he mine, I would make sure he is healthy before I pushed the riding crop too much - doesn't mean he doesn't need it just make sure there isn't a legitimate reason behind his lazy behavior
     
    11-01-2012, 08:17 AM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
If he is a lesson horse and does not go very well for beginners, just leave him alone. As long as he rides well for you and anyone else that knows how to ride better, he is just 'taking care of' beginner riders. As their skill level comes up, he will ride better for them.

I have 2 old lesson geldings that do this and I would not trade them for anything. They ride alert and forward if a rider knows how to ride even a little. They poke along and take care of beginners and handicapped riders. They suit me just fine.

If you want to keep a horse 'sharp', you have keep beginners off of them and you you cannot give lessons on them.
I thought this as well, but there are downfalls to this. I can see that sometimes its very discouraging for the little girl. She is very proud of what she's accomplished, I told her many girls who have been riding longer than her can't get him going like her. But she also asked if she could ride my friends horse for her lessons after she got to ride her for a half hour
I can feel when he's going to break and keep him moving and that's the key. My beginners can't do that and I think this is how he decides who he will listen to. I know horses that are just easy rides for all and I want that- what I have planned for Salem, stubborn just wont do.
As far as his health, he is only 4, never had any inccidents or lameness, I highly doubt its a physical issue.I get nothing but compliments on how nice he looks when he's moving, under saddle and especialy when he's just running around playing, there is no movement issues there!His saddle fits well, its also a light synthetic to reduce the amount of weight he has to work with since he's not done growing.
     

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