Breaking and Training Horses
   

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Breaking and Training Horses

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  • Quarter horse training and breaking
  • Horse breaking and training

 
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    06-18-2010, 09:25 PM
  #1
Weanling
Breaking and Training Horses

I am curious as to information on to breaking and training young horses. I have a friend in Mississippi who breeds and breaks young Quarter Horses with his father. He is nineteen now and has been training his entire life and will still be learning every day. I am relatively new to horses, and certainly green to any aspect of husbandry, breeding, caring, or training them. I know it is a lengthy process that takes much patience, care, and education, but I feel that I have a calling to any sort of equine industry.

I am not inclined to look up a small colt or filly on Craigslist, spend a small purse on it, and bring it home to break. However, because I'm interested in the topic, I was curious if anybody could recommend me any books on the matter. Even though I know I will not be training young horses currently, I know that every time a rider is with a horse, especially one that is his or her own, either something is either being corrected and taught, or bad habits are being enforced, regardless of whether the person interacting with the horse is aware of. Therefore, I trust that even having the information in the back of my mind will help me any time I am involved with horses.
     
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    06-18-2010, 09:50 PM
  #2
Weanling
Here's a few GREAT books I have... Not all of them are entirely about colts, but all about training and young horses, etc.

Starting Colts by Mike Kevil-- This one's definitely the best for info about young horses, overall.

Http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Colts-Catching-Sacking-Driving/dp/1585748501
World Class Reining

Http://www.amazon.com/World-Class-Reining-Shawn-Flarida/dp/0911647783/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276911930&sr=1-1
Reining with Al Dunning

Http://www.amazon.com/Reining-Western-Horseman-Books-Dunning/dp/0911647392/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276911971&sr=1-1
And last, but not least...

Barrel Racing w/ Charmayne James

Http://www.amazon.com/Charmayne-Barrel-Racing-Western-Horseman/dp/0911647767/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276912048&sr=1-1
And again, most of these are specialized... But they are generally about working/starting these with younger horses, and they have some good info. I'm pretty sure you're not big on reining or barrel racing, but if you ever just got a chance to look through those books, they're really helpful.

But overall, the Starting Colts one is the best for what you're looking for. It's a spectacular book.

There's also a few other Western Horseman books like these, but leaning more toward weanlings/yearlings and the young horse... But I can't recall the names. I'm sure if you googled a list of them, though, you could find them. Hope this helps!

~Shelby
     
    06-18-2010, 10:35 PM
  #3
Super Moderator
Buck Brannaman

Westfall Horsemanship

While I haven't seen these particular DVDs I've seen other ones, and I think both of them are very good trainers and easy to understand and follow.

P.S. But I don't think DVDs and books = real trainer.
     
    06-18-2010, 10:59 PM
  #4
Weanling
Agreed, Kitten_val. But books are great if you're not actually doing it, just looking for information. I was just coming back here to post about Westfall horsemanship.. but you got it covered.

I have a few of the Westfall DVDs, they're spectacular. Stacy is also a great clinician, she makes things so easy to understand. Highly recommended. =)
     
    06-19-2010, 04:44 AM
  #5
Yearling
I have the John Lyons book on starting colts, which was somewhat useful to me. I do have a Buck Brannaman book- he is an amazing horseman and down to earth decent person.
     
    06-19-2010, 09:37 AM
  #6
Yearling
One of the best things I ever did was "apprentice" with a trainer. In five years I have learned an unbelievable amount. I was a complete novice, and while I am no professional and have a lot to learn still, I've done all the groundwork on the youngsters, started several undersaddle myself, show, and assist in breeding. See if you can't find someone that will teach you. There is nothing like hands on training on training,lol
     
    06-19-2010, 10:14 AM
  #7
Green Broke
Lol that must have been really awesome to do! Im soo jealous!
And I LOVE Monty Roberts! He's amazing!
     
    06-19-2010, 11:21 AM
  #8
Weanling
Thanks for the information. I'm not interested in starting anyone right now of course, but I may spend a few months at my friend's house and let his father teach me about how they breed and break their colts (and train them and so on) if they'd have me.
     
    06-19-2010, 11:37 AM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacksmama    
One of the best things I ever did was "apprentice" with a trainer. In five years I have learned an unbelievable amount. I was a complete novice, and while I am no professional and have a lot to learn still, I've done all the groundwork on the youngsters, started several undersaddle myself, show, and assist in breeding. See if you can't find someone that will teach you. There is nothing like hands on training on training,lol
I did the same thing. I apprenticed for 5-6 years. I did the ground work, I started a few horses (young and old) by myself and have worked with a number of problem horses.
I am far from an expert, and far from a professional.
I still have a riding instructor and take lessons even though I have been riding since I was a little girl.

I enjoy working 'under' other people. I feel that I learn so much more (the good, the bad, and of course some ugly in there too). You will never agree with everything someone says or does but you have to learn to keep what you can use and like and leave what you can't and don't.

To get the most from watching a trainer;
Ask questions when the trainer is not working, that's good.
When the trainer is working; sit down, shut up, watch, and learn.

Remember; You only get experience by doing... perhaps you can find someone to train under that can help you bring a horse along.
I worked at a lesson barn that would often go to an auction and pick up a project horse. WE would generally feed it, work with it, then find it a good home (or if it was really good we would keep it for lessons). It was great becuase I often rode those horses 2-3 times a day with lessons. The more horses you work with the better.
     
    06-20-2010, 08:28 PM
  #10
Foal
Book called 'making not breaking' I believe by cherry hill, starts from the beginning and teaches SO much about raising a horse, from ground training up to basic dressage
     

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