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Breeding Stud turned Riding horse problems

This is a discussion on Breeding Stud turned Riding horse problems within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        04-21-2011, 06:33 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    I would ask your aunt if you can borrow her for a bit. It won't take long at all. If you are able to do it watch them. Let them sort things out it may mean your gelding being kicked at but as long as it doesn't go into a full blown fight leave them to let it sort it out. He needs that part of it is he doesn't respect other horses. He needs to learn that as well.
         
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        04-21-2011, 06:55 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    I have a horse that was gelded a month before I picked him up and he was almost 4. He was a very bad stallion I.e. Too many hormones and started attacking people. So it did take some time to re-establish a proper relationship. It took about a year of consistent handling. I would not use any kind of chain on him that will just build resentment and possibly make him more dangerous - a rope halter is sufficient. I agree with the turnout and it is better for him to be turned out and socialized with lots of horses if possible. In the meantime you need to consider his mood and the time of year. It's Spring right now and the mares are all going into heat and of course he's going to know that.
         
        04-21-2011, 07:37 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by equus717    
    I would ask your aunt if you can borrow her for a bit. It won't take long at all. If you are able to do it watch them. Let them sort things out it may mean your gelding being kicked at but as long as it doesn't go into a full blown fight leave them to let it sort it out. He needs that part of it is he doesn't respect other horses. He needs to learn that as well.

    She doesnt have shoes on so getting kicked would not hurt him that bad. Besides that he still thinks he is a stud so he feels the only pain he feels is when his feelings get hurt

    I would not leave them unattended no way not after the way he has been acting toward my gelding. I would be afraid of what I would come back to!!
         
        04-21-2011, 07:53 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horselvr    
    She doesnt have shoes on so getting kicked would not hurt him that bad. Besides that he still thinks he is a stud so he feels the only pain he feels is when his feelings get hurt

    I would not leave them unattended no way not after the way he has been acting toward my gelding. I would be afraid of what I would come back to!!
    Awesome. Good luck and keep us posted.
         
        04-21-2011, 09:36 PM
      #15
    Showing
    Truthfully, if he is having most of his issues under saddle, then that's where he needs the most work. Contrary to popular belief, groundwork won't solve all under saddle problems. The only way to get them broke to ride is to ride them, a lot. Miles and miles and wet saddle pads every day would do that horse a world of good.
         
        04-21-2011, 09:54 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    Contrary to popular belief, groundwork won't solve all under saddle problems. The only way to get them broke to ride is to ride them, a lot. Miles and miles and wet saddle pads every day would do that horse a world of good.
    This is contrary to popular belief.... really.
         
        04-21-2011, 09:56 PM
      #17
    Showing
    There you go with that snarky attitude again :roll:.
         
        04-21-2011, 10:50 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Could you put up corral panels inside the pasture with the other horses, so that he is getting somewhat socialized, but not able to hurt the other horses? It would be a pain in the butt to have him in there, but it would help.

    I agree with smrobs as well with just getting more miles on him.
         
        04-22-2011, 08:16 AM
      #19
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    Truthfully, if he is having most of his issues under saddle, then that's where he needs the most work. Contrary to popular belief, groundwork won't solve all under saddle problems. The only way to get them broke to ride is to ride them, a lot. Miles and miles and wet saddle pads every day would do that horse a world of good.
    I agree with smrobs. The reason being since your horse behaves well on the ground and you can ride him bareback in an arena the next step would be to put those "miles and miles and wet, sweaty saddle pads" on him. What mouth piece does your D-ring snaffle have on it? Just a suggestion, but you might consider switching to a side-pull headstall with an o-ring snaffle. Your horse "runs through the D-ring snaffle", because he can. For arena work the D-ring is a good choice, but for some horses the side-pull w/snaffle gives the rider a little more to work with for control. Plus, the side-pull is not a severe form of control.

    Keep us updated on how it goes....
         
        04-22-2011, 09:07 AM
      #20
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    Truthfully, if he is having most of his issues under saddle, then that's where he needs the most work. Contrary to popular belief, groundwork won't solve all under saddle problems. The only way to get them broke to ride is to ride them, a lot. Miles and miles and wet saddle pads every day would do that horse a world of good.
    This is also my Dads opinion. That I need to put miles on him. I want to put miles on him trust me, I love to ride and we go on 6+ hour rides typically which the last one was almost 4 hours and he didnt even break a sweat. It was pretty easy trails overall not a lot of hills and not a lot of rough terrain. I don't mind riding a rough horse I have done it a lot especially with my barrel horses, I just don't like having NO control. That is a scary position to be in. I am afraid with the lack of control and him not realizing he is not a stud if he were try to mount a mare or something I would have no way to stop him.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by VelvetsAB    
    Could you put up corral panels inside the pasture with the other horses, so that he is getting somewhat socialized, but not able to hurt the other horses? It would be a pain in the butt to have him in there, but it would help.

    I agree with smrobs as well with just getting more miles on him.
    We have the corral up next to the pasture where he can touch noses with the other horses, he calls to them, they come over and then he strikes out. So they mosey away. I have never done it but what do you * and the others * think about tying him in the pasture on a patience pole? I would not leave him unattended but that way I am sure he cannot get to the other horses they can come smell him and be around but he can't hurt them really. We have a a telephone pole in the middle of one of the pastures we use for young horses to learn "patience" there are no wires or anything on it, we put it there so when we are teaching our young ones to stand tied they don't get hurt. They can't rare up and puncture themselves and there is nothing to get caught on if they throw them selves down. It was just a thought...

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by candandy49    
    I agree with smrobs. The reason being since your horse behaves well on the ground and you can ride him bareback in an arena the next step would be to put those "miles and miles and wet, sweaty saddle pads" on him. What mouth piece does your D-ring snaffle have on it? Just a suggestion, but you might consider switching to a side-pull headstall with an o-ring snaffle. Your horse "runs through the D-ring snaffle", because he can. For arena work the D-ring is a good choice, but for some horses the side-pull w/snaffle gives the rider a little more to work with for control. Plus, the side-pull is not a severe form of control.

    Keep us updated on how it goes....
    Just a regular old copper snaffle. I didnt want to put an O ring on him because in my experience they pinch horses. I don't want to give him a bad experience as he is just learning to take a bit. We worked for weeks up to taking the bit and he does but he is still not comfortable in it. (you know, started by putting the lead rope in and out of his mouth before I asked him to take a bit) I tried a snaffle with longer shanks but he was chewing on the shanks so I didnt want him to be able to "grab" the bit out of my hand. I might look into a side pull this weekend...

    I am still waiting for the trainer to get back to me to see if he can help me...
         

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