Bringing a horse back into work
 
 

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Bringing a horse back into work

This is a discussion on Bringing a horse back into work within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to bring a horse back to work
  • Getting a horse back into work

 
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    03-08-2010, 07:32 AM
  #1
Foal
Bringing a horse back into work

I've recently bought a TB, 9 y/o. He's been blobbing in a paddock for 6 mths+.

I work this horse, every single day, and almost all day saturday. I walk him in hand for half hour, or lunge him, but he's recently became wierd with lunging, and will not be sent out, we stares me down, and when I walk out from him he follows, or bucks and wuicks when I send him out. And stops after a half circle.

So I would like a sort of routine or shedule to bring him slowly back into work, im only wanting him as trail rider/paddock hack. But I would like him fit.

He has an enormous grass gut, no muscling in his rump or top line, and I also don't have an arena or round pen.

Any advice, or schedule help would be greatly appreciated, general comments and opinions for on ground/in saddle work would be great!

Thanks - Bianca.
     
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    03-08-2010, 08:12 AM
  #2
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Savvy Debonair    
I've recently bought a TB, 9 y/o. He's been blobbing in a paddock for 6 mths+.

I work this horse, every single day, and almost all day saturday. I walk him in hand for half hour, or lunge him, but he's recently became wierd with lunging, and will not be sent out, we stares me down, and when I walk out from him he follows, or bucks and wuicks when I send him out. And stops after a half circle.

So I would like a sort of routine or shedule to bring him slowly back into work, im only wanting him as trail rider/paddock hack. But I would like him fit.

He has an enormous grass gut, no muscling in his rump or top line, and I also don't have an arena or round pen.

Any advice, or schedule help would be greatly appreciated, general comments and opinions for on ground/in saddle work would be great!

Thanks - Bianca.
If there are any hills around, hill work under saddle is excellent for building muscle.

Your problem with lunging may be just that he's bored with that if that's all you've been doing. I certainly wouldn't want to be running in circles everyday. Although not an acceptable behavior, having as much variety as possible in the work will make things easier.
     
    03-08-2010, 09:59 AM
  #3
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Savvy Debonair    
He has an enormous grass gut, no muscling in his rump or top line, and I also don't have an arena or round pen.

Any advice, or schedule help would be greatly appreciated, general comments and opinions for on ground/in saddle work would be great!

Thanks - Bianca.
What you describe is a horse with a digestive issue. Horses with 'real' hay bellies will be fat all over. But a horse with a digestive issue; worms, food allergy, inflammation etc... will be bloated, distended and lack fat and muscle.

I think his recent behavior issues are him telling you he's not feeling good.
     
    03-08-2010, 10:27 AM
  #4
Started
What you describe also sounds like he's the one in charge, not you. If you have one I would use a roundpen and establish that you're at the top of the pecking order.
     
    03-08-2010, 11:37 AM
  #5
Banned
I don't know what special problems you or the horse has but for me to bring a horse back into work I would just saddle up and go for any easy ride and see how the horse handles it. You can tell when she is tired. Done regularly and over the weeks the horses endurance as well as yours will improve and you can go longer and throw in some trotting.
Let the horse tell you how fit she is by just doing.
     
    03-08-2010, 12:06 PM
  #6
Started
^Agree
     

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