Bringing on a Youngster!
 
 

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Bringing on a Youngster!

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  • Bringing on a foal

 
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    05-16-2008, 04:23 PM
  #1
Foal
Bringing on a Youngster!

I have a 3 year old cob and have done some general training with him. He has just been castrated and we are now looking to bring him on. Although whenever I try and lunge him he always comes back into me. He doesnt respond to a lunge whip and/or anything else. I can't stop him coming back to me. I have had someone else lunge him as I walk around with him and then slowly drop back, but when I drop back so does he. Does anyone have any suggestions as to how I can get him to walk on his out with me lunging him. Any suggestions would help.
Thanks,
     
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    05-16-2008, 04:27 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
Its because he doesnt respect your space, dressageit will havea good answer, this is a problem I have because i'm all lovey dovey and not grrr bosslady...

You should never back away, when he comes towards you either step forward ro stand your ground. You need to ... I can't come up with the word, threatening is not the right word, but he needs to always be watching you for your next move. ...

When he comes into you you'll want to head towards his back end and push him out... someone else will be able to better describe...
     
    05-16-2008, 04:30 PM
  #3
Foal
He thinks he is your boss, you could do with some parrelli training with him hun, let him know who is the lead horse....you!
     
    05-16-2008, 04:31 PM
  #4
Foal
Thanks for your reply. I don't back away when he comes towards me I push him away but when im walking around with him whilst someone else is lunging him I try to slow down so he can keep going on his own but he decides to stop too. He wont walk unless someone is with him. He acts kind of bored to be honest. Is there someway I can get him to focus to the activity he is doing with out wanting to wander off back to his field mates?
     
    05-16-2008, 05:34 PM
  #5
Showing
You have to be dominant over him. He's testing you and it's working - he's getting away with it. When you say "go away" (not literally the words, but with your body language) he should snap to it!
Training to lunge takes time and dedication and moreover CONSISTENCY.
Start off by leading him around in a circle, and drop back to his shoulder. Ask him to keep moving forwards by using your voice, body, and even artificial aids such as a lunge whip. Now that you have a consistant circle, start moving back while continuing to ask him to move around you - again, use your body or whip to encourage forward movement. It is your responsability to out-think the horse... if you feel that he might want to start moving in towards you, say "out" firmly, and make him work away from you - be aggressive about it if you have to . If you're asking him to move out of your "bubble" then he should hop to it right away - don't let him come back in until YOU invite him back in.
He might not know what to do once he's away from you, so make sure he stays out on the circle.
Your body position is everything - don't look at his face, make sure you keep your eyes and body pointed towards where the girth would lie with a saddle on. Keep in mind your body position on the ground is like your aids in the saddle, if you want forward motion, keep your body position pointed towards the area you would normally influence for that in the saddle, and that would be right behind the girth.

Alright, I'm sure I've lectured enough, let me know if there's anything you'd like clarified.
     
    05-17-2008, 10:04 AM
  #6
Foal
A big thankyou to JustDressageIt, your suggestions and information was a lot of use and im sure it will help the next time I come to try working him. Will keep you posted. Once again thanks for the help.
     
    05-17-2008, 01:26 PM
  #7
Showing
Yeah, he's not respecting your space. Show him who's boss- you're in control.
JDI did give some great advice, keep us posted. ;)
The 7 games of Parelli are also pretty useful for teaching the horse to respect your space.
     
    05-17-2008, 01:59 PM
  #8
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by jemma_bailey
A big thankyou to JustDressageIt, your suggestions and information was a lot of use and im sure it will help the next time I come to try working him. Will keep you posted. Once again thanks for the help.
Not a problem, you're more than welcome! I would love to hear an update when you get a chance.
I don't practise Parelli, never have, probably never will, so my training stems from more "traditional" methods, just a personal preference. I find that Parelli doesn't work for every horse, so just be careful with that if you decide to do it.

Best of luck! Can't wait for an update. The biggest thing is to remember to be FIRM, you're the boss. In a herd situation, the lead horse would not hesitate to kick or bite a horse that's come into its personal bubble without invitiation, so you need to be aggressive - not kicking or biting of course, but you don't really have to worry about hurting him too badly.

Remember to keep your "energy" (body position, any whip aids) aimed at the girth/barrel area or the haunches - avoid the head and neck.


One more thing:
If he starts coming back into you, don't back off - step forward into his space and make him move away from you.

Good luck!
     
    05-17-2008, 08:52 PM
  #9
Trained
Oh I had it all planned out what I was going to say and JDI beat me to it ;) very well said :)

Have you had any progress with him?
     
    05-17-2008, 09:57 PM
  #10
Started
I agree that the Parelli 7 Games would help you out a lot.

Basically if he comes in at you drive the part of his body away that is coming at you......his nose. Where ever the nose goes the body will soon follow. You can block him with your hand or use the handle of the whip to tap his nose away.
     

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