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Bucking.

This is a discussion on Bucking. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        12-18-2012, 01:02 AM
      #11
    Trained
    Maybe Tiffany but his owner had him in consistent work when he started so we don't know. It might help. Having a heavier rider might also help. [his owner is not much heavier than me, Mum is more than twice my weight, bucking is harder with a heavier rider!]

    We're going to make him work his butt off over the next few weeks haha... Mum will be keeping him in consistent work, I expect, and I'm pretty confident in saying she's most likely going to train him up as a dressage horse and low-level eventer.

    But this isn't just one buck here or there, it's LAPS. Mum is at this stage refusing to let me be the jockey to ride out the bucks, and I'm petrified that because she isn't 18 any more she might get hurt if he is successful in ditching her :/ I have brought my concerns to her but to no avail.
         
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        12-18-2012, 01:58 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    I'm old, like your mum, so I will sometimes get off and make my horse lunge for respect if she gets really cranky. I have been doing stretches with her and then doing long and low walking for 5-10 minutes. That seems to help. Regular work helps. Warm weather helps. But she doesn't buck like your mum's horse, she mostly crow hops, but she goes sooo high in the air, I feel like I'm in a helicopter! I suppose she has a cold back and a good size pinch of ornery/laziness. One thing I have noticed is she doesn't twist when she does her thing. Does your mum's horse twist when he bucks?
         
        12-18-2012, 02:21 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    I am going to try a heating pad on her back today while I stretch and groom her before we saddle up.

    That's her in my Avatar, April (ImaCageyLady is her registered name). April is a breeding stock paint, 15'3, 13 years old, from the Two Eyed Jack bloodline (her grand-dad). She moves like butter, and rocks way back into her hocks.

    So, if your mum is going to ride him and she doesn't want to risk an injury, I hope she will consider this. There is nothing wrong with popping off a horse and making them work from the ground when you feel like you may get unseated. I always worried about it when I was riding, especially when I was healing from a major accident and was rather fragile and unbalanced for quite a while. I was following some of Clinton Anderson and he said there is nothing wrong with getting off as long as you make them work harder when you are on the ground.

    I can't wait till you get your mum's horse and start working him. Please keep me posted!
    HorseCrazyTeen likes this.
         
        12-18-2012, 02:33 PM
      #14
    Trained
    I don't think he twists... I believe it's a lot harder to stick on if they do, he's not easy as such but if he was a particularly difficult horse to stay on he'd ditch me pretty quick. Your girl sounds like she's just cold backed, and it's not too difficult of a thing to manage if you know how.

    He's here now and Mum's going to be riding him later today [it's 3.30am haha he got here yesterday afternoon, not much time to settle in but we want him to throw everything including the kitchen sink at us, because the aim is to get ALL the buck out of him... he is going back to his beginner owner in 2 years if she is able to take him back]... I worry because the last time she came off was because her previous horse shied, nothing more, and she snapped her humerus... and a year and a half later still isn't quite 100%... I don't want to have to be a carer again, it's too hard. Granted she was bareback on previous horse and has since resolved not to ride bareback again, but still. I just wish she would let me be the one to take the risk. I've never broken a bone... a couple of fractures yes but never a proper break... and I have had some NASTY falls, so even if Ben does manage to ditch me I won't break. Whereas Mum might.

    ...there is also an ulterior motive haha he is SO nice!
         
        12-18-2012, 04:44 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Its very good he doesn't twist! It makes it much easier to work with. What are doing up so early in the morning?

    Well, I am looking forward to your progress reports. It should be fun!
         
        12-19-2012, 07:05 AM
      #16
    Trained
    Lol, late, not early! I'm a night owl.

    Mum had the first ride at home today, just in the round pen. Walk/trot, he was brilliant, no signs of bucking. He is petrified of the saddle, bridle, mounting block, actually mounting, dismounting... basically scared of everything until you're on, then is ok until you go to get off. But very responsive. Transitions on seat alone, don't have to touch his mouth.

    Then, later, we went for a trail ride, intending to take him to a friend's place [bigger round pen] for canter work. Didn't get that far. MY GOD.... he is a great big coward! Terrified of everything. Jogs, flips his head [Mum is thinking about getting a tie-down and putting it on loose so it only comes into play if he head-flips], shies, threatens to rear [hasn't actually gone up... yet...].

    Somehow I don't think he's ever going to be suitable for his beginner owner. He's too sensitive, and too "hot". He isn't even on anything that could possibly heat him up, just pasture and grass hay. This same heat that makes him totally unsuitable for beginners is what will make him a superb dressage horse with the right training and a good rider. The saying goes that riding a dressage test correctly and competitively is like riding an unexploded bomb and if you don't collect that energy and keep it together your bomb explodes.

    The quiet ones like my middle-aged gelding are so much harder to get any pizzazz out of!
         
        12-19-2012, 07:25 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Just likethe typical western breed downhill [most/many are, not all - a slightly downhill horse is faster and can get down on a cow or turn a barrel a bit better than an uphill horse] hey.

    How long have you had this new horse?
    Good to hear Magic is going well though you can never do enough groundwork, just have to use your imagination to keep it interesting for you and the horse.
         
        12-19-2012, 10:26 PM
      #18
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mad mardie    
    Just likethe typical western breed downhill [most/many are, not all - a slightly downhill horse is faster and can get down on a cow or turn a barrel a bit better than an uphill horse] hey.
    What made you say this? I'm curious how it fits in.

    Ben is definitely your "cliche" stereotypical OTTB with the head flipping and the jogging and the fizziness... the bucking started with an ill-fitting saddle [his owner did wise up and get something that fit, and did have his back worked on... he wasn't very sore, and Mum has worked those spots out and is keeping on top of them] but I think he has learned that bucking gets him out of working/being ridden. So if it's stereotypes, yep, relevant.

    If it's horse build, he's not downhill at all, he's so well put-together... he is the nicest horse we have, and that says a lot.

    We've only had him a few days, and weren't even looking really in the first place. I guess you could say he just fell into our laps. I was browsing for tack on a buy/sell Facebook page and there he was.. something about him spoke to me so I mentioned him to Mum [I have too many horses as it is haha didn't need another], because she'd been saying for a while that she wished she had something she could ride. Funny how that happens, isn't it?

    Thank you, she's nearly ready to be backed and I would have mouthed her by now if not for her bridling issues [we are working on it, when her new one gets here I'll see how she reacts; old one is now a teeny bit on the little side for her and while it still fits well enough that I can use it I'd rather have something with more adjustability]... she will most likely be backed and broke by me with help from my boss purely because now that she's figured out that she can show me she's scared without getting told off, she's not exploding, and I feel like she's giving me enough to go on now.
         

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