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bucking AT me?!

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  • Pony charges me in the pasture

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    08-29-2012, 09:10 PM
  #11
Started
Until your horse is trotting up to meet you at the fence, I'd carry a stick with me whenever I would go to get her, just in case she turns her hind end to you. Teach her how to yield - how to yield her hind and front ends, how to back up and side pass and put her head down on all verbal and physical command. This comes in great handy. Eventually you can just point to a part of her body and she'll move it away - if you do it right, then you never have to fear her hind end as you can Always move it away from you.
     
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    08-29-2012, 09:12 PM
  #12
Foal
She seems a bit bipolar, lol one minute she'll respect me completely, another she'll act like a green 2 year old.
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    08-29-2012, 09:15 PM
  #13
Weanling
My horse would buck/ kick every time he was lunged or asked to canter. We found out that he had Lymes disease and that he had very weak stifles. Also, my saddle was causing him back pain. I agree that she could be anticipating pain, in which case lunging is the worst thing to do. It is very hard on their joints. After the vet, chiropractor, and saddle fitter clear your horse of pain then get a trainer to help you show her who is boss.
     
    08-29-2012, 09:16 PM
  #14
Started
This is because she wants to be good, but she doesn't really respect you. Horses are typically well behaved at heart, most mares would much rather you make their decisions for them, but if they ever have reason to doubt one of your decisions they will take it upon themselves to make a better one. This is how mares work in a herd, watch carefully and you'll see this.

She may obey willingly when the surroundings are perfect, but if things aren't perfect and she's not listening, she's not really trusting you, she's just taking the path of least resistance.

She may also have 'mare' problems, talk to your vet about it, mark her heat cycles on the calender and mark her mood that day along with the cycle. They make 'mood charts' for women, you can use one of those for your horse. I prefer to go herbal paths for horses like that, but knowing exactly when a horse is feeling bad can let the vet know how to treat it (which hormone she is lacking or in excess of)

ETA: I just want to restate this in case you missed it the first time - yes lunging at the canter is very very very difficult for a horse, even a strong, balanced horse should only do it in limited times. Why are you even lunging her?
     
    08-29-2012, 09:18 PM
  #15
Trained
^^^ great post.
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    08-29-2012, 09:31 PM
  #16
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by lexxhorse    
Shes not that dangerous, she just has an attitude.
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I promise. She's Dangerous.
Very.

DO NOT EVER play with this kind of behavior!!!! Never!! You need to get help. Trust me.
I'm not trying to scare you, but I want you to be safe. I don't want to see you on the nightly news. This has physically happened to me, and still causes me pain to this day-

I used to have a horse, named Harley. He had an 'attitude,' but I thought it was just his cheeky personality. Boy was I wrong. All of a sudden, he charges me in the field one day. Natural reaction, and not knowing better, I took off! I read up on this horrid behavior, knowing it couldn't be tolerated, and everything said to 'stand your ground, don't go in there without a whip.' So I did. I went in the pasture, and just walked around. Sure enough, he went for me. Last minute, I chickened out. I didn't want to hit my 'sweet pony.' So I just yelled, and only ran when he could literally reach out to bite me. Which he tried to do. Then I knew it was serious.

But I still treated it as attitude. So the behavior continued. I still had my whip, but it laid unused, which was my #1 mistake. Then he started kicking out at me. He did this a few times before he finally landed me on the arm. It wasn't bad, but enough to leave a good size bruise, and a good amount of pain and soreness for the next few days. And THAT is when my hard head figured it out. I DON'T want it to take you this long. And below is why.

Well, we finally got a trainer to help us out. He came and lunged him.
He. Beat. The. Crap. Out. Of. Him.
He used the whip, and I'll be darn if that horse was a different beast. Respectful, kind, caring, and no more of this.

Untill one day.
He charged me again. I didn't have the bravery of the man. That horse ran me over. To this day, I have a hairline crack in my pelvis. What I don't have? Harley. He went to the trainer, who later sold him to a man in Michigan, who uses him as a cow horse.

I beg to mercy, PLEASE get help, and get MORE than enough. I swear, you neeed it. Swallow your pride, do it before you get hurt. Please. Please.
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    08-29-2012, 09:48 PM
  #17
Started
While I respect what you went through - yes using a whip is a great way to maintain distance and space for an aggressive horse in the field. But a horse attacking you in the field is the result - not the problem. The problem is a severe lack of respect and TRUST. This horse sees you as something to fear and/or hate if he is out right coming at you to Attack unprovoked.
If you are chasing a horse to catch them and they attack it's because they have no respect for you but they do have trust - they TRUST that you will make them do something they don't want to.

You don't need to beat a horse to make them respectful. You need to earn their respect, not beat the submission out of them. I have learned this long and hard with my mare. She was never aggressive or violent, but she had NO respect for me or my space. After being run over a few too many times when she got 'spooked' I took the same action as you are advising. I carried a stick with me and lead her near all the things that had scared her. When she stepped into my space I gave her a good schwack with the stick and told her 'space'. Well this worked 1 or 2 times. Then she was horrified of me. Then I was scarier than anything in the outside world that she was previously spooking at. If I was able to catch her she did all she could to get away from me. When something else would frighten her rather than running to (and into) me like she had previously she took it into her own hooves to save herself. I did not earn her respect I made her fear me. There is a big difference and I learned that difference. She respected my space yes - but when she got scared she respected my space so much she was half way across my property before I knew she had spooked and my hands were thoroughly damaged with rope burn (always wear gloves!)

Beating your horse for being disrespectful will not earn you respect - just fear. Sometimes it's hard to tell the difference, but sometimes the difference means everything.

NOW, to fix this you need to practice ALL the yielding training. You need to practice those yielding skills in situations that are difficult for her. If she gives you a hard time catching her, make her work her little behind off. When you catch her, let her rest, do something good for her. Then go on to your training - teach her respect by controlling her feet. If you control their feet you control the Entire horse. Think about Every type of training you've ever heard of. All of them route in controlling a horse's feet.

That being said - carry a stick with you and USE it to defend yourself. Your horse has teeth and hooves, with very powerful hooves. She can hurt/kill you. Do not be afraid to defend yourself! Any higher horse in her herd would gladly pop her a good kick if she acted that way to them. You need to do the same. But once you've caught her beating her will just make her fear you/hate you more.

Practice all those skills I mentioned in all my other posts. Always keep your safety as your top priority (I know it's hard because we love our horses so much, but no one else is going to put up with your horse if you aren't there) and always have someone around in case of emergency (even if your working with a bombproof kid's pony).
     
    08-29-2012, 10:12 PM
  #18
Green Broke
HCTJM is needed.

She does not respect you and thinks she is teaching you a lesson when she is doing this.

I will not tolerate any of this from any horse, period. These types of things can get you killed, or worse, crippled and a vegetable.

You need to reassess your handling period, as I imagine that has much to do with this attitude of hers.

You may be babying her, soothing her, or letting her insults slide by, and you may not even be reading her well enough to realize that she is doing them.

Quit treating her like a friend, and treat her like a horse, in that you don't talk to her, no treats and everything is on a business like level. And don't handle her at all without lead/halter, as that is one way to establish that you are the boss.
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    08-29-2012, 10:18 PM
  #19
Super Moderator
You DO have a big problem.

You DO have a dangerous horse whether you want to recognize it or not.

You ARE in over your head.

You don't need a bigger whip. You need to learn how to interact with a horse and how to relate to them. You need to know how to get a horse to respect you and never give you a cross look.

I have several 2 yer olds and none of them ever lays an ear back at me. I don't carry a whip and never raise my voice. I just know how to handle and get along with horses. They all treat me like I am their god. They all meet me at the pasture gate, stick their heads in halter and do anything I want and I do not know where a whip even is around here.

You need someone to teach you the same skills. You do not have to be bigger or meaner. You just need to learn how to interact more effectively.
     
    08-29-2012, 10:31 PM
  #20
Trained
Lump me in with those who think you need to hire a trainer or get rid of the horse. A hundred little things have led up to this, but posters can't find them all and advise about them over the Internet. You need someone watching you, and someone who can first defuse things to a level where you are not in danger.

I fully agree that fear is not respect, but respect takes time & you don't have it. There are holes too deep to get out of on your own. This sounds like one of them.
Kayty, Speed Racer, boots and 1 others like this.
     

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