Bucking under Saddle
 
 

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Bucking under Saddle

This is a discussion on Bucking under Saddle within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horse tries to buck and spin under saddle
  • How to teach a horse not to buck under saddle

 
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    06-24-2009, 11:34 AM
  #1
Weanling
Bucking under Saddle

Hey!

I figured out a long time ago that, for me, the best way to train a horse out of bucking under saddle was to go in a roundpen and make the horse run. I usually put a western saddle on so I can have a good seat. I find that when a horse is running around and tries to buck, they will basically almost fall on their heads. They always save themselves but it is self correcting. I stay out of the way so the punishment for bucking is all on them. It has worked for many horses over the years, but now I'm curious.

What other ways do people get a horse out of bucking?

My old trainer used to smack them with a crop when they bucked, but that seemed counter-productive seeing as they then bucked from the whip.
     
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    06-24-2009, 11:36 AM
  #2
mls
Trained
I find out why and eliminate the why.
     
    06-24-2009, 11:47 AM
  #3
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
I find out why and eliminate the why.
What if it's just a bucker? Not caused by saddle fit, back pain, etc?
     
    06-24-2009, 11:51 AM
  #4
Weanling
^ agreed. I've ridden plenty of horses that bucked out of stubbornness. They didn't want to work, they bucked, the owner would get off. There was nothing wrong with the horses except maybe laziness or stubbornness.
     
    06-24-2009, 12:53 PM
  #5
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
I find out why and eliminate the why.
Ditto!

Stubbornness or excitements are also the reasons. Just make it work. And in fact truly LAZY horse will not buck - it's just too lazy for that too.
However most cases I've seen it was a back issue (or bad saddle fit, or problems with pad).
     
    06-24-2009, 01:14 PM
  #6
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
Ditto!

Stubbornness or excitements are also the reasons. Just make it work. And in fact truly LAZY horse will not buck - it's just too lazy for that too.
However most cases I've seen it was a back issue (or bad saddle fit, or problems with pad).
Rider error is huge.

One of our group was tossed last weekend. Riding a borrowed horse. Horse has only ever given the 'yahoo' feet 6 inches off the ground buck previously. This rider MADE the horse buck. Trying to make her run but in her mouth at the same time.

Cold backed horses will crow hop until warmed up. I have a gelding like that.

My other gelding I really ticked off last night. We were loping through grand entry practice. Heading toward the gate, some of the lead horses took off. I would not let my guy run - he responded by putting his rear in the air. I responded by picking up his front end and putting him in a spin. He walked off - head and rear down. Still mad but under control.
     
    06-24-2009, 02:04 PM
  #7
Weanling
Yea, but what about horses that only buck in one place. A Perfect school pony we have will buck near the far corner. You can circle him there to your hearts desire but he will keep bucking till the sun goes down. You can't just ignore that corner. He's perfectly sound, bitless bridle so the kids won't bug him, feet are great, back is good, and saddle was made for him.

When I asked my question, I was talking about constant buckers. Some horses don't have a vice that can be fixed. Sometimes horses just kick naturally, just like for some humans, the automatic response is to hit playfully.

Or even a horse that is fresh and bucks. I would rather train that horse to find a better way to expel his excess energy than to buck and risk injuring himself or others.
     
    06-24-2009, 02:49 PM
  #8
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piper182    
^ agreed. I've ridden plenty of horses that bucked out of stubbornness. They didn't want to work, they bucked, the owner would get off. There was nothing wrong with the horses except maybe laziness or stubbornness.
Thats a fact. I'm guilty of it in fact My first horse (a 2 year old) started doing little bucks so I got off thinking there was something wrong with her. She started doing it more (big surprise) I called a trainer who set me straight right off the bat. Never let it be something the horses did that gets you off. If your forced off, get right back on.
     
    06-24-2009, 03:13 PM
  #9
Weanling
Make them work. The rider seems to get too caught up in worrying about the horse bucking and waits for it rather then getting the horse busy. They are soo many reason or explanations as to why a horse bucks. A person could sit here until they were blue in the face as to why a horse bucks. My goal riding a "bucker" is to keep there feet moving. Keep there mind busy so they are concentrating on where there feet are, not about bucking. Keep them moving until they relax and then let them walk on. This is after a person rules out pain, teeth etc...
     
    06-24-2009, 03:38 PM
  #10
Weanling
Horses that are buckers by nature are few and far in between. Usually there is a why and solving the why is better than trying to ride it out. Sometimes the answers are not as obvious as saddle fit, teeth etc. While bucking is not an acceptable answer and it should be worked through- riding it out is not always the answer.
     

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