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Buying a horse that's right for you.

This is a discussion on Buying a horse that's right for you. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        04-02-2013, 11:56 PM
      #171
    Foal
    This thread is great. I was one of those green riders who had taken lessons when I was younger and ridden my friends' horses so I thought I was experienced. WRONG! I ended up buying a TWH who was waaaaay too much for me to handle.

    First of all, I knew nothing about gaited horses. I just liked the way he rode and thought it was the smoothest thing I had ever done.

    Second, I had been told that he was stubborn and needed a firm hand but I wanted a horse so badly and it seemed like the perfect opportunity. This is not something you want to do. Its better to wait and find exactly what you want and whats going to work for you. Don't rush it!

    Long story short, I decided he was too dangerous for me and I, being the inexperienced and now traumatized owner that I was, realized that I was doing him more harm than good and had to give him away.

    But there is a happy ending. I took my time and found a very sweet little quarter horse that is a lot more forgiving than my first horse and we are a much better combination.
    Pat1960 and NickerMaker71 like this.
         
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        04-08-2013, 01:10 PM
      #172
    Foal
    I agree with it all but the don't buy a youngish horse.
    I bought a horse called Misty who was 14 she was perfect in an arena with one or two other horses took her to pony club camp jumped a 5 bar gate (I didnt want to)
    Sold her bought sky a 6yr horse and she was PERFECT at camp shows everywere (I was a novice)
         
        05-30-2013, 03:30 PM
      #173
    Weanling
    Good post... buttt. I own a cribber, and by far is the best horse I have ever owned. You don't have to say automatically no to a cribber.
         
        06-17-2013, 05:55 AM
      #174
    Foal
    This is THE BEST POST you could have written for those who are new to the horse world! Even with the attitude, I think it helps get the point across about how important it is to match a novice rider with an experienced horse! Woo! You go girl!
         
        07-16-2013, 10:18 AM
      #175
    Foal
    I agree with most of this post except I don't think you should automatically pass up a horse that is perfect for you in every way just because they have a vice such as cribbing or stall walking for example. Finding the perfect horse can be hard, sometimes almost impossible. I feel like there are often compromises you have to make. If you find a horse that meets all your criteria but then find out it cribs I don't think that should automatically make it a deal breaker. You should take into consideration how manageable his cribbing is. I have known plenty of horses that have vices that are easy to manage. I had a weaver that as long as he was in regular work with a decent amount of turn out and a hay net in his stall would almost never weave. I also knew a stall walker that would not stall walk if he had a window he could hang his head out, and I know many cribbers that that don't crib outside or with a cribbing strap on, or with their stalls set up with feed pan and muck tub for water. Personally over the years almost all of my favorite horses to ride have had some sort of stable vice, a few were cribbers and one was a weaver.
    Pat1960 likes this.
         
        07-16-2013, 06:16 PM
      #176
    Foal
    I wish I would have read this right when I began my shopping. I have had horses my entire life but they were all older, well-trained-with-lots-of-miles horses. Then, when my most recent Arabian (RIP Rose) passed away, because I was going away to college, I didn't buy another. Now, 5 years later, I just bought an approx 13 year old rescue horse. I am a decent rider and my mother has some experience breaking and training horses. The trainer I bought Rebel from got him from a farm where he was never used or broke. So this trainer put 100 days of training on him (about two summers ago) and then he was used periodically as a trail horse for people around the barn and then was put up for sale. Because we know the girlfriend of the trainer, we had the opportunity to go and stay for the weekend to get to know him. We spent two days straight with him and finally decided to buy him. We got him home and for the first month and a half, he was excellent out on the trails and down the road (with the exception of slight hesitation going through water). Then, a couple weeks ago (I'm not sure if he has just now decided to show his true colors or if there is another problem) we have had two bucking incidents, one of which succeeded in throwing the rider (my mom) and bruising her pretty bad. Now we are kind of at a loss for what to do because of course, we are both pretty attached. I don't feel that I rushed into buying this horse, however, because my confidence has taken a nose-dive, I feel like I should have went with another older bombproof kidsafe horse instead. We are currently in the process of talking to the trainer to find out what he thinks is best. I really would hate to see him go because he is such a perfect gentlemen on the ground and really seemed to be a good match for me in the saddle until this issue arose. So, I am really happy that this thread was posted....I just wish I had read it BEFORE buying anything! Ugh...
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        07-29-2013, 05:37 AM
      #177
    Foal
    At the age of 15 I was bought my first horse a 2 year old unbroke app stud. I was told after my mom bought him he had been pawing people in the face. Thanks to ALOT of help from my boyfriend/trainer /vet tech ( THANK GOD!!) I am now the proud owner of the sweetest horse ever. After gelding him, spending months training him for shows and trails he is now my dream horse. I realized I was in way over my head the day he got loose and tried to mount a mare I was riding. I am just glad unlike most I had someone experienced around to help me. He is now completely dead broke together we have won club shows, trail ridden many times, and He has been used for pony rides to earn money for a local club. Since then I have learned a lot about horses and started training my own. I would NEVER suggest anyone new to riding to buy a young horse, green horse, or anything of the sorts. There is way to many dangers in it and you or someone else will almost always get hurt.
    Pat1960 likes this.
         
        07-29-2013, 06:45 PM
      #178
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kbg7506    
    I wish I would have read this right when I began my shopping. I have had horses my entire life but they were all older, well-trained-with-lots-of-miles horses. Then, when my most recent Arabian (RIP Rose) passed away, because I was going away to college, I didn't buy another. Now, 5 years later, I just bought an approx 13 year old rescue horse. I am a decent rider and my mother has some experience breaking and training horses. The trainer I bought Rebel from got him from a farm where he was never used or broke. So this trainer put 100 days of training on him (about two summers ago) and then he was used periodically as a trail horse for people around the barn and then was put up for sale. Because we know the girlfriend of the trainer, we had the opportunity to go and stay for the weekend to get to know him. We spent two days straight with him and finally decided to buy him. We got him home and for the first month and a half, he was excellent out on the trails and down the road (with the exception of slight hesitation going through water). Then, a couple weeks ago (I'm not sure if he has just now decided to show his true colors or if there is another problem) we have had two bucking incidents, one of which succeeded in throwing the rider (my mom) and bruising her pretty bad. Now we are kind of at a loss for what to do because of course, we are both pretty attached. I don't feel that I rushed into buying this horse, however, because my confidence has taken a nose-dive, I feel like I should have went with another older bombproof kidsafe horse instead. We are currently in the process of talking to the trainer to find out what he thinks is best. I really would hate to see him go because he is such a perfect gentlemen on the ground and really seemed to be a good match for me in the saddle until this issue arose. So, I am really happy that this thread was posted....I just wish I had read it BEFORE buying anything! Ugh...

    The same happened to me. I bought a mare who was supposed to be green broke from a women I knew. A couple days later after we bought the mare and we started to work with her, we got a surprise. The mare was totally head shy. She freaked out and reared up as we tried to clean out her feet, she was very nervous, spooky, scared to death about anything. It took us several month working with her to able just to clean her feet. That was eight month ago. We have been working with her everyday she got allot better but we needed help. Two month ago we send her to a trainer. She is making progress. I understand being attached. I would never buy another horse without our trainer taking a look at the horse first. I just don't have the experience needed to purchase a horse. Lucky us that we did not get hurt.
    kbg7506 likes this.
         
        07-29-2013, 07:17 PM
      #179
    Green Broke
    Generally speaking, I agree. However, My first horse was a yearling, I was 15 with family that couldn't tell a horses head from its tail. Thankfully my BO was willing to give me some pointers, let me ride her horses in the mean time, and I had the right attitude, was determined and absorbed info like a sponge. I spent many evenings surrounded by a stack of training books, reading, taking notes and listening to those more experienced.

    In short, I broke her out at 3, and sold her to a local show jumping barn with a great reputation that was extremely impressed with what I'd done. I didn't actually buy a broke horse until last year, all my other horses I started my self, a good chunk of them I halter broke them my self. Did I make lots of mistakes? Sure. Could I have done a better job? Of course. The fact is, my family is poor and couldn't afford lessons, never mind a horse. I worked evenings and weekends all through high school to afford my horse. I rescued her from a back yard breeder when she was slowly starving to death.

    I would not recommend a green horse to many people, but if you have the right support and attitude, It can work.

    I also would not be deterred by cribbing, especially for a recreational horse.
    Pat1960 likes this.
         
        08-04-2013, 12:09 PM
      #180
    Foal
    Hose shopping for Dummies (that's me!)

    I have gone through all of this I read here and am still going through it now.
    I bought my first full sized horse 2yrs ago because I felt terrible for her. She was in bad shape and the other horses at the sale lot had just trampled and killed her newborn foal. My Mom and rescuer instincts took over and left my better sense in the dust. The lot owner lied up and down about her age, experience, etc. to make the sale.
    Long story short I got her in good condition physically but lacked the experience to engage her mentally. My riding experience has consisted of rented trail horses in my younger days. I am now 48 and had not ridden in about 15 years at that point and never actually owned a horse myself. I thought I was doing okay but.... on our first ride I was promptly thrown and hurt. I had also been very badly injured on a rented trail horse when I was 11. A horse I trusted but was put in a compromised situation and freaked. I was Hospitalized with permanent injuries. This has shaken me to the core and I am sure the green horse I bought 2yrs ago knew it. She had no confidence in me as a leader so she became frightened, unruly and unloaded me. Took me 3 months to recover from my injuries. I sold her to a local trainer. I have been terrified to ride since and that was 2 years ago. Nov 2012 I bought a Haffie pony who I was told was safe for a timid rider. 13HH (not as far to fall if unloaded) LOL Was told he was 9 and well broke. He was actually barely 5 and barely green broke and like to buck and bolt was the truth. He bucked my daughter face first into a tree. I sold him to a Haffie nut with an apparent death wish.
    So I found wonderful horses for my daughter and husband. (it should work for somebody right?) The 13yr old Quarab mare I bought for hubby (experienced rider) turned out to be prego unbeknownst to the seller. Now we have a 4 month old appy colt to add to the mix.
    My daughter rides a 13yr old POA gelding with a slight attitude to match her own... ha! They are a good match and adore each other.
    I have ridden for a few minutes recently my husband's horse who is a high strung(ish) Arab cross who wants to go go go. This makes me very nervous and I have a difficult time controlling her. (no buck-she just know she can pull crap with me)
    Now in my quest to get over myself and find a horse for me I have leased an 8yr old quarter walker (gaited) mare who is slow and seems very gentle. I only had an opportunity to ride her in a small ring where I got her. She was mild mannered, lowered her head for the bridle, stood still for the mount and had super breaks in only a hackamore. I felt a connection with her and her spirit was gentle and forgiving in nature. I waived my arms around her, I threw rocks over her and nothing. Very steady and sure. Now I KNOW that when I get a horse home there will be a honeymoon period and I may see a different horse. Her name is Willow and I have had her two weeks now. Now at home we have observed she is still dead last on the pecking order as she was in her previous home. This is good because we worried about a new horse picking on our horses, especially the baby. She is wonderful with them but.... yes there are always a but. She is herd bound to a dangerous level. She lacks confidence and is why she is last in the pecking order. (double edged sword) I am doing forced separation now so she will build confidence in me and in herself. We are also weaning the 4 month old colt so I am following a similar pattern. Just did not bargain for this and have now called in a trainer since I am so limited in my own abilities and confidence. I DON'T want to rub my fear off on her. I have to put on my big girl panties and deal with her. Has anyone gotten an otherwise solid horse out of herd bound behavior? I am tired of giving up and want to see if I am make this work. I am on a 4 month lease before I commit to buy. Would love friendly advice.
         

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