Can i make profit by buying, training and selling horses?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Can i make profit by buying, training and selling horses?

This is a discussion on Can i make profit by buying, training and selling horses? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Profits on selling horses
  • Can you make money buying training and selling a horse

Like Tree30Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-02-2014, 06:53 PM
  #1
Foal
Can i make profit by buying, training and selling horses?

Hello everybody

I'm just wondering if anybody has experience or ideas for success in training and selling horses. I was planning on buying young unbroken, nicely build, cheap horses ( 3-4 YO in the $500-$1000 range). I have a lot of experience training and breaking. As of right now, I have clients to train and break their horses. (so far all my clients were amazed of my work and could not believe how their horses have changed). The stable I'm going to board the horses at charges only 150/month which includes food and I will get a discount for helping out around the barn) I'm planning on working with a horse for about 2-4 Months. I'm training in western disciplines. By the time I sell the horse it will be able to:

- respect space and rider
- lead nicely
- stand tied
- desensitize (bomb proof)
- one rein stop
- listen to the seat
- lunching stage 1-3
- know 4 ways to back up
- yielding HQ on ground and when riding
- shoulder in shoulder out
- moves out of my space when asked
- lead departures
- speed control
- sliding stop
- side passing
- collection
- and a couple more things I will only remember after I submit this

Once the horse is ready to sell I was thinking of asking about $3,000- $4,000? What do you guys think? I'm only 22 and I would like some advice from someone who has experience in that field. Let's say I get a horse for $500, have him for 4 Months, which adds about $400 to investment so I spend $900 on that horse plus getting the hooves done is another $100. So I spend a total of $1000 on the horse and will sell it for about $ 3,000- 4,000 does is sound reasonable?

I'm a full time student and my job doesn't give me many hours, but the reason I want to do this is not just for money. I'm very passionate about horses. I love to train them and give them a good start in their lives. I would like to have my own horse, but I kind of don't because I enjoy training and breaking horses so much. And I like to say if I don't have my own horse I have more time helping other horses and their owners to understand each other and make their lives together more enjoyable :) I also want to have more experience, grow and get my name out there.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-02-2014, 07:07 PM
  #2
Started
You could make a go of it IF you could get that kind of $ at the end,but not likely. With only 2-4 months training they will not be finished enough IMO to demand that kind of money. Then what happens if they aren't selling & you have to hang onto them & continue to have to pay their upkeep.
     
    03-02-2014, 07:09 PM
  #3
Weanling
Hi, I'm not an experienced anything, I just want to give you some ideas to reflect on.

Are you able to tell a "good prospect" horse? Some cheap horses just need some training and a possibility in life, some others have a mean attitude, or a conformation so poor it's guaranteed they will have soundness issues.

Do you know the market in your area? What is selling for 4000$? What are local preferences? IE what do sell more, flashy paints? Appys? Arabs? Loud colors? Whatever has blue eyes?

Is the kind of training you will give the same that local buyers request? Ar local buyers more interested in showing, in trails, in whatever?

Where do local people buy? Are you going to be present and well advertised there?


Other than this^ if you are able to do it, I would suggest you find people who have some kind of horse in mind and they would like to shop for it and then have you train the horse. In my area there is a trainer who is known to break young drafts, he has a deal with a kill buyer (we have slaughters here) that whenever he wants he can go where the horses are and pick one and have it delivered to his farm. So when someone is interested in saving a draft from the slaughter, this trainer goes with him, helps him choose a nice prospect (attitude and conformation wise) and then he teaches the horse the basics so the new owner has a nice safe companion.
     
    03-02-2014, 07:17 PM
  #4
Trained
What about vet costs? E.g. Vaccines, coggins, etc ?
MsBHavin likes this.
     
    03-02-2014, 07:19 PM
  #5
Foal
Yea it's a gamble. I have no doubts though in getting the horse there within that time ( I done it plenty of times) and IF necessary I always can tag another month to it. I done it plenty of times. It's not a huge problem for me to keep them :) The horses will also be very calm and safe by that time. :)
     
    03-02-2014, 07:32 PM
  #6
Foal
@ PaintHorseMares I thought about that, I have a friend who is a Vet and she will help me out with that.

@Cielo Nuttornu Yes, I'm able to tell a good Horse. I also won't turn my back on "mean" horses. I know how to handle them and get them to be respectful and well mannered in no time. I know exactly what I want. I found many horses I'm interested in for a cheap price. Many are very well bred. I will be mainly looking for Quarter Horses. In my area people want QH, TW, trail horses, barrel, pleasure, etc.
     
    03-02-2014, 07:39 PM
  #7
Yearling
I don't want to rain on your parade, or hurt your feelings I just want to offer a point of view. There is always risk involved no matter what direction you take in life. You have to decided how much risk your willing to take. As mentioned above what if the horse does not sell for what you want to get for it, what if it does not sell at all. You also have to foresee vet bills expected and unexpected. I have never gotten a horse that was current with their teeth, I knew it when I bought them and the first thing I have always done is get their teeth done. But 4 months of training on a young horse is not that much training and will certainly not give you a bomb proof horse much less seasoned horse. The only thing that makes a broke horse is miles and miles and miles under their feet. You would be selling green horses and unless they have great bloodlines I doubt you will get what you want for them, and even then you can't ride a set of papers.

Not to say that what you want to do cannot be done, just really take an honest look at what you want to do and have contingency plans and deep pockets. The best way to make a little money with horses is to start out with a lot of money.

In the past I have had good luck a few times picking up older 6-12yo range cheap/free horses who were broke to ride and just in need of manners and some tuning. I spent 4 -5 months fixing them and tuning and sold them for a very small profit. That may be something to look at as well, you just have to be careful that you don't end up with one who truly has problems physically or mentally. Good luck to you. Remember anything is possible it just depends how much you want it.
     
    03-02-2014, 07:42 PM
  #8
Weanling
I am playing around with the idea of doing this myself :)

The things that I am concerned with are mainly economical. We have lots of cart racing here, so there are a lot of OTSB's floating around that could use a second career.

My main concern is who my customers would be? What type of horse are they looking for? What skills should they have? As of current, I'm not sure I'm convinced that there is a large enough market for horses right now to support it. That said, I live in Michigan, and I have no idea what the market is like where you are, but that is the first thing I'd advise you to research- make sure you have a customer base!
     
    03-02-2014, 07:48 PM
  #9
Green Broke
My biggest question is, can you afford to keep one long term if you can't sell it? This is what is keeping me from buying a second project to sell at fair (gives me 5-6 months to get a well broke all around horse started on games/jumps).

I own mine, who will always be a project (mentality). I'm okay with that, I've kind of come to terms over it. I've owned her a year and still haven't finished her because I'm learning and having to find different techniques that work for her. I've broke, rebroke, fixed problems, etc but she's different than any of the others. I can canter a perfect pattern on her..but I put her on a circle and ask for a canter? Nope, not going to happen and she'll tank around leaning a ton. But her patterns are great for only seeing them three times.

Anywho..if you answered yes to the question I first asked, then you have to look at the other factors.
-How much are horses with the same training going for in your surrounding areas?
-Will you be showing the horse to promote it during the 2-3 months? Factor in those show costs as well.
-With full-time college and a part-time job, what acceptable time will you have to show said horse to potential buyers (my problem right now)?
-Are you willing to take a loss on a horse just to be rid of it if it's potential just isn't there?
-Is breaking even okay with you? Personally, I don't want to sell a horse for less than I have into it (just physical money, not my time).
-Are you sure you won't fall in love with the horse? If so, will you keep it or still sell?
-Do you know a good prospect when you see them? What if the horse isn't what it seemed when you bought and turns out to be dangerous/more than you can handle? Will you keep trying and hope to not be hurt, sell to anyone you can off-load it on, send it to auction, or..?

Those are just a few that come right to my mind, I'm sure there's more. These are all things to heavily consider though, a wrong answer on any of those or a wrong decision on a prospect can make or break you. Also, if you do get a dangerous horse or one that is too much, what you choose to do with that horse will be on you..and with how the horse world is, everyone will know what you did with it (or think the worst and spread rumors) and make their opinions about you.

Good luck though, I'm hoping I get my raise and division change so I can start flipping as well (like I planned two years ago xD ).
Posted via Mobile Device
MsBHavin likes this.
     
    03-02-2014, 08:00 PM
  #10
Foal
@gssw5 Thank you for your honest reply. I'm extremely passionate about it I'm willing to take the risk. To begin I only would take one horse at a time and then I go from there. I know what I'm capable of training the horse like I mentioned above in that time. As of matter of fact, I'm training one of my clients "problem" horses right now. This horse is already a completely different horse after only 9 days. (I have some videos on my channel) If I can't sell it for that price I always can go down. Like I said the money isn't the most important part for me. I'm fine with making only $500 profit. :)

@ Disastercupcake what area do you live in?
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Training and Re-Sale for profit 4horses Horse Training 16 02-22-2013 08:53 PM
Opinion on free training/profit from sale? Iseul Horse Training 15 01-24-2013 12:08 PM
Is it possible to make money buying young horses, training and then selling them? ButtInTheDirt Horse Training 25 12-06-2011 09:16 PM
buying and selling? Horse Dreamer Horses for Sale 9 01-04-2010 07:36 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0