Can i make profit by buying, training and selling horses? - Page 3
   

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Can i make profit by buying, training and selling horses?

This is a discussion on Can i make profit by buying, training and selling horses? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Training colts and selling
  • Training and Selling Trail Horses

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    03-03-2014, 12:56 AM
  #21
Weanling
Advertise to train other people's horses and give lessons. Usually the rider needs training along with the horse.

I do not recommend training your own horse. I've had bad luck. I did pre-purchase exams on both my horses. They both passed. And they are both lame. I bought my mare directly from the breeder. Looked at her, looked at her parents. Thought she would be perfect. She was 2 yrs old and not started. Nice straight legs. A few months after I started her under saddle, I noticed she was not quite right. Whatever it is does not show on X rays (normal). I've had 2 vets look at her and they have no idea. Last vet said take her to the university for a nuclear scan which is an additional $1000 or more.

My horse before that had navicular syndrome. X rays did not show any changes... It turned out to be soft tissue damage. She than went on to develop degenerative ligaments (most horses with it appear healthy, but it can strike at any age, and you can't test for it).

So even if I had done a pre-purchase with X rays all the way up both horses would have passed!

What is your plan for dealing with an incurable lame horse? Are you willing to put it down? Give it away for free and hope it doesn't end up with the meat buyer? Keep it and retire it?

What happens if you get hurt while training (bucked off and break a bone)?

It is better to train for other people. At least than you don't have to worry if the horse goes lame. You don't have to worry about board and feed costs.
     
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    03-03-2014, 01:00 AM
  #22
Started
If you are already taking in outside horses you probably have a pretty good idea of whether or not you can make money with ones you would own.

I have done well with short term flips. Underweight, spoiled, or overweight pasture puffs. Ones fed too hot a feed and kept in a pen are my favorites.

I plan on keeping them 4 weeks (with the exception of underweight ones who may go to pasture). I start marketing them at 2 to 3 weeks, because by then I know how the horse will turn out. I own the pastures and the hay is home grown. Lower costs there too.

I do not bother starting young horses because they know so little and too often so do the buyers. I have friends who start colts and sell them as green broke, but only to good horsemen. They have the market base to do this.
Cherie likes this.
     
    03-03-2014, 04:32 AM
  #23
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by horsemanship91    
I'm happy even with a little profit. I'm not trying to get rich of of it. Its just something I love to do and when I can earn a little extra money doing it, great!
From your post and replies, sounds like you're OK with the risk(s).
I say go for it. After the first horse, you'll have a better idea of how it will work out.

Good luck with your plans.
     
    03-03-2014, 07:36 AM
  #24
Super Moderator
We made a very good living doing this for many years until I developed very severe arthritis and degenerative joint disease. We are still trying to figure out what to do since I can barely ride at all any more.

Young prospects will not make you a dime. They will all lose money because of the reasons Boots gave. You cannot keep them long enough to get enough done with them. We have had such a good market for our breeding program that we could sell them, but training and selling ordinary young horses is a lost cause.

Your best market will be in 'flunk-outs'! Reining, cutting and even pleasure horse trainers have customers that pay big bucks for very well bred prospects. Three to six months into training they find that many (sometimes half or more) are not going to be good enough to be competitive. The honest trainers will tell the owners and these horses are sold for a lot less than the training in them without even considering the original purchase price. I have bought cutting bred horses with 6 months of training for around $2500.00. Some of these horses sold for $10,000.00 or more as yearlings. Some had been spurred and yanked around and it took a lot of re-training, but they had papers to kill for and conformation and still had more ability than junk prospects --- if they are sound. Flunk-out reiners are by far the best deal if you can find them.

Anytime anyone buys a flunk-out, you want to have access to that horse's Vet records. I would not touch one if the trainer and/or owner did not authorize me to contact their Vet and see what had been done with this horse by the Vet. Some of these horses make great mounted shooting horses, team sorting horses and the bigger ones make roping horses. If you join a local group of shooters or penners, you can sell every really broke horse you ride at a practice session. The same is true if you can team rope.

The next best prospects for trail horses and recreational riding horses are 5 - 8 year old spoiled horses or horses that people have turned out and lost interest in. Once you have the training in these horses straightened out, they are old enough for recreational riders to buy. These people WILL NOT buy young horses.

The market is good (and was even through the recession) for, what we call, 'Dummy-proof' horses. These are horses that any Dummy can get on and ride off. We figured out a long time ago that the people that can ride anything, do not have any money. The people with all of the money to buy anything they want to ride, cannot ride very well or at all. These people will not buy young horses, but they have all of the money.

If you do not want unhappy customers, insist that they come and ride 2 or 3 times, free of charge, under your supervision. Explain to them that horses only ride as good as they are ridden. Explain that horses are not mind readers and if they do not know how to ask properly and do not know how to release pressure placed on the horse, they will go downhill very quickly. Try to teach them to 'push' instead of 'pulling harder'. If you do not do this, most of the people that will pay a good price for a saddle horse will quickly mess it up and will tell everyone that it is your fault.
GotaDunQH, boots, Paradise and 3 others like this.
     
    03-03-2014, 07:44 AM
  #25
Green Broke
You've put a lot of thought into this-sounds like something you really want to do, I like the list of what you will train the horse to do, Except for the slide stop-that is something I would not ever do & I just like a nice solid stop when asked. Just me 2 cents worth.
     
    03-03-2014, 08:02 AM
  #26
Weanling
I'm working on making a living the same way- although its a mix of buying/training/selling and having clients. This thread is really good for me to read and think about. I currently have two horses for resale, a reasonably broke horse that a client wants kid/husband proof, one horse coming in for work on becoming a trail horse, and another woman who just wants me to ride her 20 yo Arab mare to keep her in shape. I know that I don't have the discipline to budget larger chunks of money every couple months, which would be how it was if I only did resales, so I like a mix. I don't make much, but I love it. Being poor is not new to me, so its no hardship! As I build up more connections over years and warmer months come (hopefully sooner than years, but I'm starting to wonder!) , I know I'll be busy!
     
    03-03-2014, 09:06 AM
  #27
Foal
With the economy the way it is no ones is in the market for horses. In fact people have just been abandoning horses all over the country and rescues are filling up. The last thing you need isto sink money into buying horses then having to pay to feed them in the hopes people will buy them. You might find yourself going broke in the process. Plus another thing to think about, the way our society is going, less and less people have any interest in horses because people don't go outside anymore lol. I would give it a year or two and see where the horse industry is going. In the mean time be a trainer. That's something horse people need and at least that way if it doesn't work out you won't be out any money. Best of luck to you
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    03-03-2014, 09:25 AM
  #28
Super Moderator
I don't think the markets good enough right now to make a real profit selling at the end of it you're interesting in - there is money at the top end if you can sell a horse that's competition ready but you can't do that in the timescale you're looking at if you buy unbroken horses - because they will still be classed as 'green' when you sell them
The horses on this website are all under $1500 and some are being sold as 'great on trails' and quiet to ride
BargainCorral
I think you'd make more money training other peoples horses especially if you can undercut the opposition and possibly be prepared to travel to clients and work on their horses on their own property
     
    03-03-2014, 09:29 AM
  #29
Green Broke
I think you need to look at the market around you and the horses currently for sale. What are the horses around you selling for and what does their advertisements claim they can do?

What kind of horses sell in your area? What can you buy in that price range? Do the two match up? If registered QH's are the big seller in your area, then investing in OTTB's (for example) may not be the best choice to make.

Are these going to be trail horses? Do you plan on getting some show miles and away-from-home miles on them?

Are you going to have PPE's done on each horse? If not, what is your plan should you get a horse and it turns out to be unsound? What about if it's injured under your care (accidents do happen) and it becomes permanently or temporarily lame?
     
    03-03-2014, 10:31 AM
  #30
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridemcowgirl069    
With the economy the way it is no ones is in the market for horses. In fact people have just been abandoning horses all over the country and rescues are filling up. The last thing you need isto sink money into buying horses then having to pay to feed them in the hopes people will buy them. You might find yourself going broke in the process. Plus another thing to think about, the way our society is going, less and less people have any interest in horses because people don't go outside anymore lol. I would give it a year or two and see where the horse industry is going. In the mean time be a trainer. That's something horse people need and at least that way if it doesn't work out you won't be out any money. Best of luck to you
Posted via Mobile Device
This is really not the case for very broke horses. While the prices for them dropped in 2008, the demand never did. The prices are now coming back up.

In 2011 (I think), the national Finals for team sorting were held in Ardmore, OK, 35 miles away. They had over 4000 entries. Every hotel was full up here and all around. I did not go in 2012, but I heard it was even bigger. They outgrew the facility (3 indoor arenas) and moved the event to Fort Worth because there was no place available with enough stalls around here. These are mostly families. Most of these families keep 2 or 3 horses each. They do not buy 'junk' horses.

The Cowboy Mounted Shooting and the Extreme Trail events are growing just as fast. These people do not buy horses off of Craigs List, either. These people buy from recommendations and referrals and from ads in their trade Journals. I have never seen a point in time that a 'good', well-trained, 'dummy-proof' horse was worth less than $5000.00 since about 2000. Many will bring $10,000 even without having been competed on. The problem is that very few people can train a horse that does not have a 'list'.
Does your horse have a 'list'?
If you can train a horse like this, there is ALWAYS a market for them. If they have a lot of 'handle' on them -- all the better. The people looking for them are the people that got wealthier during the great recession. They never lost their jobs. They just capitalized on those that did.
boots and jaydee like this.
     

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