Can a lazy horse be trained to be responsive?
 
 

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Can a lazy horse be trained to be responsive?

This is a discussion on Can a lazy horse be trained to be responsive? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Why are some horses so responsive
  • Can a 'lazy' horse change?

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  • 1 Post By NBEventer

 
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    09-16-2012, 05:41 PM
  #1
Foal
Question Can a lazy horse be trained to be responsive?

We looked at a very nicely mannered calm horse yesterday. She is mellow and slow, a bit too slow. She moved forward ok at the walk, although a little slow, but she required a bit of effort to get her to trot and stay trotting. The teen riding her had to use her leg quite a bit and my daughter had to used both her tiny bump spurs and a dressage whip along with lots of squeezing to keep her going. My daughter was able to get her to canter but her default gears seem to be walk-stop :) We are looking for a horse that is kids/beginner safe (daughter is kid, I'm the begginer) so she has the right temperment, but we would like her to be a bit more responsive. Is this possible to train for or are some horses just plodders and they will always need multiple kicks and pushing?
     
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    09-16-2012, 05:49 PM
  #2
Yearling
Not sure there is an easy answer to that one. Some horses prefer to walk, yes. That said, horses can be trained to be more responsive. Also, what might the reason she is not wanting to move out be? Is she sore? Is she old? Is she just out of shape? Not trained? Let's face it, you can improve on most of those things. Not the old part. I have tried many times to improve on that myself but it just isn't going anywhere.
     
    09-16-2012, 06:11 PM
  #3
Started
I think most horses can be trained to be more forward and responsive so long as there are no underlying medical issues. That said, for a kids and beginner horse, being slow and more liable to stop than take off is generally not considered a big fault compared to the alternatives.
     
    09-16-2012, 06:23 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inga    
Not sure there is an easy answer to that one. Some horses prefer to walk, yes. That said, horses can be trained to be more responsive. Also, what might the reason she is not wanting to move out be? Is she sore? Is she old? Is she just out of shape? Not trained? Let's face it, you can improve on most of those things. Not the old part. I have tried many times to improve on that myself but it just isn't going anywhere.
This saddens me and crushes my hopes. I made a deal with the higher ups that I wont go past 20... it didn't work. I am about to step on 30 I was hoping I could make it happen then. My dreams are gone. I really hoped I would get better with age. Its not fair!!!!!!

On that note. A good feed routine and some proper work can usually turn things around. I've seen some dead lazy horses turn into some nice power machines with the right work but still be able to be the la la la horse when its not asked for.
     
    09-16-2012, 06:28 PM
  #5
Weanling
Yes, some horses can be trained to be more responsible. I have a very lazy Morgan mare. I have found that with increased fitness she is more responsive. I did send her to a trainer and that was a huge help. I will say one thing that has also helped us to make sure I am not nagging her. She becomes dull to cues very quickly if they are over used, so the key is as minimal as possible, though may have to be strong at first.
     
    09-16-2012, 06:31 PM
  #6
Started
Absolutely. When I got my gelding he was lazy beyond belief. I tried him out at the property and was constantly kick kick kick, always at him it was just annoying, but I liked him and got him anyway.
When I got him home he was the same for a few weeks, until we got used to each other he was really lazy and unresponsive... Now he does exactly what I want when I ask for it. The only place he is still lazy is in the showjumping ring but that's not bad, he still jumps everything he just doesnt rush at it
     
    09-16-2012, 06:33 PM
  #7
Foal
I would agree that being slow is a lot better than being hot and jumpy. My concern is that she won't work very well for 4-h equitation patterns if she isn't a bit more responsive. As far as we know she doesn't have any medical problems but she is a bit overweight. Currently she is doing 3 to 4 beginner lessons a week so that may be part of her slowness. In the end I don't mind the slowness at this point, but I wonder if overtime she can become more responsive so that she will continue to be fun to ride as my daughter and I progess.
     
    09-16-2012, 07:26 PM
  #8
Green Broke
If she is over weight and only being ridden by beginners I can see why she is being sluggish.

I know when I was really over weight I had no energy to do anything and kids jumping all over me made me just want to go "blah". And become oblivious to life.

I think with a good conditioning program and a few good "tune ups" she will liven up nicely.
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