Can someone explain to me the use of draw reins please?
   

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Can someone explain to me the use of draw reins please?

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  • How do you fit drew reins
  • When should i use draw reins?

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    12-26-2011, 08:48 PM
  #1
Started
Question Can someone explain to me the use of draw reins please?

Hi there, I am looking in my Dover catalog circling what I need this year. I am pretty sure I don't need drew reins. I am the kind of rider who does not like to use " short-cuts" in my training ESP with my 5 year old, Oliver.

Can someone explain to to the correct use of draw reins and when it is the oppropriate time to use such a tool. I am curious and always have room to learn more.

Thanks,
Sam
     
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    12-26-2011, 08:54 PM
  #2
Trained
Speaking as someone who has always help draw reins to be the work of the devil I would say never.


As someone who now owns a set, I say you never NEED them, but you may choose to use them when your trainer suggests that you may learn something by using them, which I did.

They are not something that I think you would decide you need, it would be a joint discussion with your trainer, and then you would know the purpose for using them
     
    12-26-2011, 09:02 PM
  #3
Started
Thank you golden horse, I pretty sure I don't need them lol condsidring Oliver is only coming back into work after having a bad case of pneumonia and un ride-able for over a month now, he just got cleared to start work so we have a lesson scheduled for next Friday!

Any-who it's just aways good to know the correct and right time to bring in different training gear!

He is a very good boy, only ride in a snaffle and is very happy with it!
Thanks!
     
    12-26-2011, 09:08 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
Draw reins can be a helpful tool for achieving headset but you have to be really careful because you can trick yourself into thinking you are where you need to be when in fact, you are low in the head and heavy on the forehand.

I have tons of training tools. German Martingale, Draw reins, and Training fork. The training fork is my favorite but they all work well with different purposes. The problem that I found with the draw reins is that I couldn't figure out how to ride without them. I had him heavy on the forehand and was very dependent on the draw reins. It took me nearly a year to get to wear I don't NEED the devices. I do like to use my training fork quite a bit though...
     
    12-26-2011, 09:28 PM
  #5
Started
What is a training fork? Iv never used any sort of martingale on him just cause iv been able to fix his small issues with me riding better, it's so funny what a difference it makes ehn ur really working on yourself from when your focussing so hard on the horse! Also super helped when my trainer got on him and was like "ooh now I understand why your arms arnt as relaxed and bent as I keep asking!" haha so she's help led alot with that! Yay

The only training aid I use my side reins when I lunge him. He responds very well to them!

One thing I'd love to learn this year (2012) is how to long line correctly!
     
    12-26-2011, 10:54 PM
  #6
Trained
The ONLY time I consider draw reins to be appropriate is on a horse who dangerously throws his head up and bolts and otherwise cannot be brought back to control. That's it that's all.

Learn to ride to get the head down and in the right place, your horse will thank you and come the next horse - you will know how to do it withough relying on gadgets!!

I owned a horse who's neck and spine were ruined by use of gadgets (a dugoug specifically and used mostly, although draw reins, a german martingale and other things were also periodically used) to the point where she is so neuro and lame that she cannot be ridden and was retired before the age of 10.
     
    12-26-2011, 11:27 PM
  #7
Green Broke
I found draw reins helpful for a very short time to help create a headset, but then as soon as I start to get that I put them away. It is easy for me to get dependent on them, it can give you a false sense of roundness and a over bridled horse if not careful. I like a German martingale better. But even I don't use that too much either. I am trying to fix my holes where I don't have depend on devices as much..lol
     
    12-26-2011, 11:43 PM
  #8
Showing
Training fork: http://www.moonrakerqh.com/tack/gfx/...rk-35-4600.jpg

It looks like a shorter version of a running martingale without the piece that goes around the horse's neck. Each individual rein does through its own ring and the clip is hooked into the middle of the girth between the horse's legs.

I use one on and off to help my horse (my trainer instructed me to do so!) understand contact and keep the frame (tucked belly, round back, engaged hind, and lastly low headset ) because he has a tendency to hollow and forget how to put himself back together. He is learning though, as I ride him 2 days without it, one with.

It's a training TOOL, not a piece of tack. But it's very helpful :) I have zero experience with draw reins though.. to google I go ;)
     
    12-26-2011, 11:44 PM
  #9
Trained
I have used them on a VERY specific few horses, all closely fitting Anebel's description of the dangerous horse that throws its head and bolts. 3 were off the track thoroughbreds, though I also took one QH x appy mare that was a real terror.
In all cases, the horse had absolutely no comprehension that it would in fact release its neck and balance using its body, not it's head. No amount of transitions, leg yield and changes of rein were going to get those horses relaxed any time soon, so as a very last option, the draw reins were bought out. I rode soley off the snaffle rein, handling the draw reins as though a curb rein. The only time the draw reins were touched, was when the horse would hurl its head in the air, twist its poll, lock the jaw, and run. The action of the draw reins didn't take long for the horses to all understand that they could actually be comfortable in a lower 'frame'. The most rides on one horse I ever used the draw reins on, was 3. They do NOT need to be used as the only set of reins, and they do NOT need to be used on a continuous basis. They are NOT to be used to achieve a constant 'head set' as in this case, they tend to teach the horse to suck back from the contact and lock at the wither and poll.
Just give them the idea, then go back to riding properly.
thesilverspear likes this.
     
    12-27-2011, 08:12 AM
  #10
Yearling
I had two lessons, and only two lessons, on a horse I used to own using a chambone because that horse was so locked through her neck and poll that neither me nor my dressage trainer (who was a very fine rider and trainer) could get through to her the concept of giving and softening. Keep in mind that this was not a young horse. She was in her early teens and had been going stiff and inverted for *years.*

I've seen videos you've put up of your horse and I do not think he needs such devices.
     

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