Can't stop my Horse
 
 

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Can't stop my Horse

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  • Why does my horse stop on the second barrel
  • Horse runs but doesn't stop real well

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    08-15-2009, 02:12 PM
  #1
Foal
Can't stop my Horse

My horse will not stop, I have tried many bits. I just don't know what to do . I have been working on her for 6 months in the pasture and she does fine but when we go out on a ride she won't stop, I spin her in circles and do a one rein stop also I turn her the other direction.I am yanking on the her mouth so much the she is starting to rear, because I get so mad. I take her out alone and with my other horse. She will stop sometimes when I take out but not on the way home she has a one track mind just wanting to get home. I can't slow her down. She just wants to go . I have been fighting with her with this issue for so long I am at my wits end. PLEASE HELP I AM SO FRUSTRADED.
     
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    08-15-2009, 02:43 PM
  #2
Yearling
Horses don't stop because of the bit,they stop because of the training.

They have to learn the cue and completely understand it.
This happens because of the consistent training that is given by the handler.
After all,
Horses know how to stop in a herd don't they?
The handler must impart the correct cues through timing and balance to the horse to reinforce to signal to stop.

Use a fence,a tree,a wall of a barn to help.
Start with ground handling.
     
    08-15-2009, 02:58 PM
  #3
Yearling
Start with shorter rides maybe? There is a horse at my barn (a BIG horse; 18 hands and a Percheron and only 7) who is like that. He will trot back to the barn and he is so big that it can be hard to stop him. They are just working on LEADING him back to the barn slowly. They started with just about 30ft away and going back, and are slowly progressing to where he is aware of what people are asking him to do. Don't go on a long ride and expect big things (like stopping and going slowly on a long ride first), start with little things first and progress slowly. When your horse is good, even if the progression is hardly anything, reward them with a pat and a "good girl". I agree with Marecare, horses don't stop because of the bit, but because of the training.
     
    08-15-2009, 03:25 PM
  #4
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marecare    
Horses don't stop because of the bit,they stop because of the training.
I completely agree bigger and bolder and stronger bits are never the answer never
     
    08-15-2009, 04:54 PM
  #5
Trained
Make him work much harder at the barn than on the trail. If he charges back to the barn and you get off of him and put him away there is no way he'll stop wanting to get back to the barn. Ride him out then ride him back and work him hard in the yard then ride him back out on the trail.
     
    08-16-2009, 11:37 AM
  #6
Started
I second kevinshorses' suggestion, in addition to groundwork. Get a perfect whoa in hand (at the walk and the trot, and at the canter on a lungeline if she lunges) so she understands what the word and the cue mean, then try under saddle. If she won't stop at the walk, don't try to go faster.

Please stay with a mild bit and work through the behavior. My bit recommendation would be a simple snaffle. I personally use an eggbutt, but if she gives you trouble with turning a dee ring or full cheek can help without getting a lot harsher. A french link mouth reduces "nutcracker" action, but some horses aren't crazy about that many moving pieces.
     
    08-16-2009, 02:22 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scoutrider    
Get a perfect whoa in hand (at the walk and the trot, and at the canter on a lungeline if she lunges) so she understands what the word and the cue mean, then try under saddle. If she won't stop at the walk, don't try to go faster.
Yes, yes, yes! Start simple and then work your way up. She needs to understand what you're asking of her when you pull back and say "woah". Until then, this problem will not cease.
     
    08-16-2009, 02:32 PM
  #8
Foal
If

If you're riding western and you don't have a noseband, you should get a bit with a harsh port and longer shanks, and then add a noseband. You can buy them to put on the bit at some tack shops, or maybe look on the internet. The long shanks and harsh port of the bit will put pressure on her mouth, and the noseband will put pressure on her nose. It should overwhelm her and she should stop.
     
    08-16-2009, 02:52 PM
  #9
Started
I agree that the stopping issue is a training issue. It starts out simple, a slightly faster walk one the way home, first time out, then if she gets away with it, she starts going faster, and further out and then she starts trying to go home as soon as you take her out. I cannot stress enough how important having good ground manners is. No matter how sweet the horse may be, if it doesn't listen to you perfectly on the ground, its not going to listen to you when you are on it. Even if you ride western, don't put a harsher bit in her mouth. Start with ground manners first. Some horses do need a stronger bit, my dad's horse being one, only because he spent some 20 odd years barrel racing in a gag hackamore, so he ended up having a really hard mouth by the time we got him. I still rode him in a nice simple snaffle, but if he saw a barrel, he would try to take off and it required a one rein stop to get him to halt, and turning him away from the barrel, but then he'd listen. So for him sometimes we used something a little stronger to make sure my younger brother could stop him when he did gymkanas on him. Do lots of in hand work, and get her to listen both on the lunge line, and while leading, and only when she is listening perfectly, stopping at your shoulder when you stop, turning when you turn, ect., without any prompting, then you can get on and try her undersaddle. If she's bad enough, when you are on her, you might even try having someone lunge her when you are on her the first couple of times, to make sure she gets it right, and starts listening to you, but that way you are safe if she tries something when you first get back on.
     
    08-16-2009, 03:36 PM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by IMissMyHorseRocket    
If you're riding western and you don't have a noseband, you should get a bit with a harsh port and longer shanks, and then add a noseband. You can buy them to put on the bit at some tack shops, or maybe look on the internet. The long shanks and harsh port of the bit will put pressure on her mouth, and the noseband will put pressure on her nose. It should overwhelm her and she should stop.
Please don't do that. I agree with everyone else that you need to stick with a snaffle and teach her rather than try and force her. Leaving gaps in training will come back to bite you in the long run.
     

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