Cantering on the wrong leg! How do I correct this? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 05:09 PM
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Well, it could be the way you are sitting on the horse, yet it could be just the horse. If it's the way you're sitting, try to adjust yourself and not put to much pressure on the inside leg. If its your horse, then it is a simple fix, yet still a hard one. What I do is keep the horse on the counter canter, but just slightly hold his head to the inside. The counter canter is extremely uncomftorable for horses. If he still does not want to change, make smaller and smaller circles until he does. This will work for teaching him lead changes, as well as getting him to want to take the correct lead. Hope I helped!
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post #12 of 20 Old 03-29-2012, 03:07 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by kevinshorses View Post
Those are the dummy terms! You need a lesson or two or fifty with a good dressage coach. I can't believe that you were eventing and never had to worry about changing leads, leg yields and inside/outside bend.
No never been eventing, I used to work at a point to point yard, so itīs a million miles away from dressage. We often took them hunting (not real foxes tho so dont worry) and cross country and local shows but no eventing. As for lessons I would have a thousand lessons but unfortunatley Iīm not that privilaged!!!
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post #13 of 20 Old 03-29-2012, 03:14 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1997magic View Post
Well, it could be the way you are sitting on the horse, yet it could be just the horse. If it's the way you're sitting, try to adjust yourself and not put to much pressure on the inside leg. If its your horse, then it is a simple fix, yet still a hard one. What I do is keep the horse on the counter canter, but just slightly hold his head to the inside. The counter canter is extremely uncomftorable for horses. If he still does not want to change, make smaller and smaller circles until he does. This will work for teaching him lead changes, as well as getting him to want to take the correct lead. Hope I helped!
Thanks this is helpfull, I dont like to believe itīs my horses fault because I do truly believe the problem normally is 99% the rider n not the horse. But my old horse never ever did this he was older and had been professionally schooled. But my lad is quite behind in his schooling, hes enjoyed far too much hacking!!!
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post #14 of 20 Old 03-29-2012, 03:16 PM
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Originally Posted by biancalilly View Post
No never been eventing, I used to work at a point to point yard, so itīs a million miles away from dressage. We often took them hunting (not real foxes tho so dont worry) and cross country and local shows but no eventing. As for lessons I would have a thousand lessons but unfortunatley Iīm not that privilaged!!!
I "misspoke" when I mentioned eventing. I meant jumping and cross country. It's pretty important to know about those basic things when your jumping. I'm just a dumb cowboy and I have to be able to change leads on my horses all the time.

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post #15 of 20 Old 03-29-2012, 03:26 PM
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From what I have seen about point to point-pretty much just "go headlong, any way you get there" and hopefully in one piece.

Perhaps this will 'dummy it down" even further. If your horse is on an inside bend, you can just see the outside corner of his inside eye.So your inside rein should have a bit more contact. Not sure if this will help. I totally agree you need lessons.
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post #16 of 20 Old 03-29-2012, 03:35 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by equiniphile View Post
Leads are very important with jumping and cross country.
By leads I assume you mean taking off/landing on the right leg??
If so yes it is important and I have never had a problem with it before only with my own horse (who bless him lacks schooling)!
Understand often in hunting/ cross country with the adrenaline pumping you dont have time to worry about what leg ther on.
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post #17 of 20 Old 03-29-2012, 03:59 PM
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WE call it "leads" on this side of the pond, not leg.

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post #18 of 20 Old 03-30-2012, 10:07 AM
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Getting the correct canter LEAD

When you are trotting and ready to ask for canter, sit very straight (do NOT lean forward), maintain steady rein contact, bring nose very slightly to the inside (left lead canter would be bending nose slightly to the left), move outside leg back then "roll" your hips ONCE from outside butt to inside hip bone same time as applying outside leg. Do NOT allow horse to run into trot - if she/he does quietly bring her/him back to SLOW trot then ask again.

Inside hip bone should be forward and rider sitting up straight for the canter. Rider hips control horses hips, rider upperbody/shoulders control horses shoulders - so if horse is cross cantering (crooked) and there is no mdeical reason (Equine chiropractor says bones are correctly aligned) then rider is crooked.

Dressage is for Trainers!
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post #19 of 20 Old 03-30-2012, 10:19 AM
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He does it right in the round pen, but wrong when you are riding him? Have you tried riding him IN the round pen to see if he gets it right there while you're riding him? I agree with Saddlebag, make your circle smaller and smaller until he switches leads, instead of stopping. This way he doesn't get a reward for picking up the wrong lead.
Kathy
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post #20 of 20 Old 03-31-2012, 03:54 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valentina View Post
When you are trotting and ready to ask for canter, sit very straight (do NOT lean forward), maintain steady rein contact, bring nose very slightly to the inside (left lead canter would be bending nose slightly to the left), move outside leg back then "roll" your hips ONCE from outside butt to inside hip bone same time as applying outside leg. Do NOT allow horse to run into trot - if she/he does quietly bring her/him back to SLOW trot then ask again.

Inside hip bone should be forward and rider sitting up straight for the canter. Rider hips control horses hips, rider upperbody/shoulders control horses shoulders - so if horse is cross cantering (crooked) and there is no mdeical reason (Equine chiropractor says bones are correctly aligned) then rider is crooked.
THANKS.... Finally someone who I understand!!! Great clear advice!
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