CHA and ARIA training?
 
 

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CHA and ARIA training?

This is a discussion on CHA and ARIA training? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • ARIA vs. CHA?
  • Cha level 4 training level?

 
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    04-05-2008, 04:26 AM
  #1
Foal
CHA and ARIA training?

I was wondering what you would need to know in order to successfully pass lv 1 and 2 of CHA testing. Can't really find anything online, and I'd have to fork over $800 to the stable I ride at per level just to find out what is required, plus the $600 to register at the place the clinic is being held at. Yea, the $800 in my mind is a little bit extreme, and I'm not going to fork over that much when I can just gather the information from other sources and other people. Has anyone have CHA certification? Same thing with American riding instructor association? How hard is it?
     
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    04-05-2008, 01:10 PM
  #2
Trained
http://www.cha-ahse.org/cert.htm#inst

Theres a bit about what each level requires you to be able to do on here.

I've been wondering the same thing -- I too would like to talk to someone who has already been certified.
     
    04-07-2008, 04:35 AM
  #3
Foal
Found something online, took awhile though :roll: Well at least it gives you more info, than CHA does........ Even Narha gives more info....... and it's on their site and easy to find........ Go figure :roll: .......

The following descriptions are meant to give you a basic idea of the skills taught and practiced.
Each level will expand from these basic outlines.

Level 1 includes: Beginner Riders
Q Safety Rules
Q Mounting and Dismounting
Q Basic Position
Q Control of the horse at the walk and trot
Q Sitting the trot or jog
Q Posting
Q Balance position
Q Basic Trail rules and trail rides
Q Approaching, haltering, leading
Q Basic Grooming
Q Saddling and Bridling
Q Parts of the Horse
Q Parts of the Saddle and Bridle
Q Basic Horse Care
Upon completion of Level 1, a student is confident riding a well schooled horse at the walk and
Trot with good position and control.

Level 2 Works on: Beginner Intermediate Riders
Q Improving Balance of horse and rider
Q Beginning the canter or lope
Q IntroductoryWestern patterns and obstacles
Q Introduction to Jumping (English) , pre-jumping exercises
Q Introduction to trail obstacles and conditions
Q More Horse Behavior
Q Colors and markings
Q Terminology
Q Horse Breeds
A confident level 2 rider will maintain good position and control at all 3 gaits on a well schooled horse.

Level 3 Riders: Intermediate Riders
Q Encourages Thinking Riders. Riders will start to focus on refining the use of their aids and other technical aspects of good horsemanship. They will start to identify problems on their
Own and make corrections. They may step up in school horse levels.
Includes:
Q Leads at the canter or lope
Q More involved transitions
Q More complex rein, leg and seat aids
Q Backing
Q Improving the seat at the trot, and canter
Q Patterns
Q Western Riders- Start training movements such as turn backs on the rail
Q English Riders- Ride on contact, lines of fences, jumps and simple courses up to 2 feet.
Q Feeding and Feeds, Bits and Bitting, Artificial Aids, Care of equipment

Level 4 Intermediate ľAdvance Riders
Q Riders will be challenged by actually schooling horses, Riding skills are becoming second
Nature and the rider is helping to better the horse
Q The rider should understand
Q Horse balance and collection
Q Extension and working gaits
Q Evaluation of their own performance and that of the horse
Q Leg yielding, turns on the forehand and haunches, lead changes
Q Perfecting transitions, balanced stops from the lope
Q Roll backs, head sets and collection
Q Signs of soundness, hoof care, conformation , vaccinations, deworming
     
    04-07-2008, 11:36 AM
  #4
Started
I was actually certified with CHA for awhile...during college I was working summers at a Girl Scout camp, and the GSA requires it. So luckily, I didn't have to pay for my certification.

I don't remember the exact points we covered, but Horsestar's list looks about right. They give you a printed manual with all the information you need to know anyway (not sure how easy it is to get your hands on one of those, I still have my old one).

There is a written test, but the majority of your evaluation comes from teaching lessons to your fellow instructors on specific subjects. The "students" are encouraged to roleplay a rider at that level of riding skill...so they will often throw in mistakes that you have to catch and correct. Safety is also a huge factor: everything from watching your student's following distance into the ring, to catching Billy with the chinstrap of his helmet undone.

After the lesson, you are critiqued in open discussion by the clinic leaders and your fellows. You might teach 3 or 4 lessons a day and ride in as many, depending on the length and size of your clinic. At the end, you are graded on performance by the clinic leaders and given a level.
     
    04-08-2008, 02:01 AM
  #5
Foal
Thanks sara this helps, I also found a handy 'manual' that is in British columbia horse coaching association (says canada, but I think it is in B.C.). I think this would be good for anyone wanting to teach. If I caught any one not wearing their helmet properly during one of my lessons Can anyone say super glue and or duck tape ? I'd make sure that helmet was securely and appropiately attached to their head. Has saved my noggin several times. And I can role play a student really well, or is that just the way my riding is ?

http://www.hcbc.ca/Images/Documents/...C%20Rubrik.pdf
     
    04-08-2008, 02:31 PM
  #6
Started
I'm glad it helped. Overall, it was a good experience for me...I had a lot of fun and met a lot of nice people. I also learned many tricks and metaphors that made teaching riding concepts much easier.
     

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