Cinchy horse help!
 
 

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Cinchy horse help!

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  • How to fix a cinchy horse
  • Help my horse is cinchy

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    08-31-2013, 07:20 PM
  #1
Weanling
Cinchy horse help!

My horse nips at me whenever I tighten his girth/cinch. He usually just threatens to nip, but has gotten me once in the base of my spine. It wasn't hard, didn't even leave a mark, but it makes me nervous that the problem is escalating and he could eventually hurt me. I have to keep him in cross ties do avoid being nipped, or someone has to hold his head.

I had posted here that sometimes the BO hand feeds him grain while I cinch him up to make it a more positive thing, but was told that was bad. Even Pat Parelli says to give the horse a treat when they turn to nip. Is that the answer or is there something else to try?
     
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    08-31-2013, 07:28 PM
  #2
Weanling
Okay the first thing that alarmed me in this post is that the BO would hand feed him grain when he tried to nip. NEVER hand feed or try to "Distract or make something positive" by food. You are rewarding the wrong thing. When you tighten the cinch make sure its not too tight and that your not doing it up too quickly, this is why horses get sour at being cinched up. Every time he turns around to nip you the the flat of your hand and bop him on the nose or on the neck so that it makes a loud noise. When you do this, in his mind he thinks that you just bit him. You aren't hurting him, if you watch horses in a natural herd setting they kick and bite each other to instill dominance and to communicate, not as punishment. So you don't have to worry. Remember that horses kick each other with over 3,000 lbs psi and bite harder than a pit-bull and they survive it.
     
    08-31-2013, 07:38 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by LouieThePalomino    
Okay the first thing that alarmed me in this post is that the BO would hand feed him grain when he tried to nip. NEVER hand feed or try to "Distract or make something positive" by food. You are rewarding the wrong thing. When you tighten the cinch make sure its not too tight and that your not doing it up too quickly, this is why horses get sour at being cinched up. Every time he turns around to nip you the the flat of your hand and bop him on the nose or on the neck so that it makes a loud noise. When you do this, in his mind he thinks that you just bit him. You aren't hurting him, if you watch horses in a natural herd setting they kick and bite each other to instill dominance and to communicate, not as punishment. So you don't have to worry. Remember that horses kick each other with over 3,000 lbs psi and bite harder than a pit-bull and they survive it.
Well, to be fair she starts hand feeding BEFORE I even begin to cinch. It's a technique, as I stated above, that Pat Parelli teaches. But I will give your way a try tomorrow (if it doesn't rain) and see how that goes.
     
    08-31-2013, 07:52 PM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrstorres2566    
Well, to be fair she starts hand feeding BEFORE I even begin to cinch. It's a technique, as I stated above, that Pat Parelli teaches. But I will give your way a try tomorrow (if it doesn't rain) and see how that goes.
Well either way, you should never hand feed a horse, it causes them to be nippy. Parelli doesn't have the best methods out there when dealing with pushy horses, in fact he isn't really that good of a trainer in my opinion, he just puts a name on a method and sells it. Its all marketing. Then again all horse trainers are like that lol. But, one of the trainers I like is Professor Beery, its old but his methods are tried and proven. I'm not trying to sound biased or rude but if you have a very dominant and dangerous horse I wouldn't be using a carrot stick on him and gently trying to get him to stop.
     
    08-31-2013, 07:57 PM
  #5
Green Broke
So glad you came to the forum for help - not trying to sound like I'm the big expert, but what I would do (in any possible way!) is keep your BO away from your space while tacking! Even if you have to 'suddenly' change your riding time - this is not good to 'feed the horse grain while being cinchy', and as someone has said, it definitely is giving the signal to your horse (remember, this is your horse, by the way, you call the shots!) that there will be a "reward if I act cinchy!" Hope this helps, and good luck! Youcan be firm and polite :)
WesternRider88 and CowboyBob like this.
     
    08-31-2013, 07:58 PM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by LouieThePalomino    
Well either way, you should never hand feed a horse, it causes them to be nippy. Parelli doesn't have the best methods out there when dealing with pushy horses, in fact he isn't really that good of a trainer in my opinion, he just puts a name on a method and sells it. Its all marketing. Then again all horse trainers are like that lol. But, one of the trainers I like is Professor Beery, its old but his methods are tried and proven. I'm not trying to sound biased or rude but if you have a very dominant and dangerous horse I wouldn't be using a carrot stick on him and gently trying to get him to stop.
Hmmm, learn something new everyday! I had no idea, I thought Parelli was a great trainer! Never heard of Professor Beery, but I am going to Google him. Thanks! :)
     
    08-31-2013, 08:01 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrstorres2566    
Hmmm, learn something new everyday! I had no idea, I thought Parelli was a great trainer! Never heard of Professor Beery, but I am going to Google him. Thanks! :)
No problem, just trying to help :) nippy horses can get very dangerous. And there are many different good horse trainers out there, you just have to study and look into it and you will learn a lot more than just following one person's ways. Good luck, let us know how it turns out :)
     
    08-31-2013, 08:05 PM
  #8
Green Broke
A lot of horses get cinchy due to poorly fitting tack that may be hurting them.
You might want to check your tack.
Also are tightening the cinch too tight the first go?
Horses get cinchy if you haul into them tightening it as much as you can the first time. I cinch my broke horses in two stages. First, tightening enough to keep the saddle on, walking them out a few steps, retighten, untrack them again then mount.
     
    08-31-2013, 08:20 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
A lot of horses get cinchy due to poorly fitting tack that may be hurting them.
You might want to check your tack.
Also are tightening the cinch too tight the first go?
Horses get cinchy if you haul into them tightening it as much as you can the first time. I cinch my broke horses in two stages. First, tightening enough to keep the saddle on, walking them out a few steps, retighten, untrack them again then mount.
His tack fits fine, and I cinch properly. I think he became cinchy when he was a school horse. Lots of young kids saddled him, and probably pinched him and tightened too fast. So now he expects it to hurt, so he nips first.
     
    08-31-2013, 08:52 PM
  #10
Weanling
If it was me I would let him run into my elbow he'll learn
azarni and CowboyBob like this.
     

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