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Colt.

This is a discussion on Colt. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to bring up a foal
  • Colt learns respect

 
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    05-02-2007, 03:44 PM
  #1
Foal
Colt.

I dream of someday purchasing and raising my very own colt and bringing him on myself.
Is there any good books upon the subject that I could buy, is it as difficult as it looks?
All I see is the huge potential bond that must be evident between both horse and rider and not the hurdles you have to over come first.
Regards Lisa.
     
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    05-02-2007, 05:30 PM
  #2
Foal
I would suggest the John Lyons book, Bringing Up Baby. It is very informative and step-by-step. I would also have someone handy that could answer questions and possibly help you in raising it.
     
    05-03-2007, 04:05 AM
  #3
Foal
Thankyou very much I shall look that book up as soon as possible. I appreciate your response.
Kind regards Lisa.
     
    05-03-2007, 08:26 AM
  #4
Weanling
Remember colts can be very difficult to handle especially when they are starting to find their feet and try to dominate horses and people around them.

You can of cors get very lovely colts but its not always the case. My little boy was sweet as anything until he was around 14months. He would stand tied like an angel, lead on the road, put his foot in a bucket so that I could clean mud off his feet etc etc. He then came in from the field nipping and then started to strike with his front legs and finally rear when he didnt want to do what he was asked. He was then promptly gelded. (not that it helped much-he is fairly good now but I am one of the few people to have encountered him without his teeth marks being left behind from the experience lol)

He realy thinks its he's playing with people as another horse, theres no malace but people wont trust him as I do! Think I just have an understanding with him, and we get on well!

All the best though but do seek professional advice especially when choosing the one.

Elz x
     
    05-07-2007, 06:37 PM
  #5
Foal
I don’t know of many books that would be of huge help.I agree with the John Lyons book, "Bringing Up Baby" its a good book. I think having hands on experience is the best way to go . If your starting your first colt, I would not do it with out a trainer present or apprenticing under one. You don't want to get hurt or your horse.
     
    05-10-2007, 03:27 PM
  #6
Weanling
I think the biggest mistake people make when bringing up a foal (either filly or colt) is treating the foal like a big dog. I like to remind people "what is 'cute' now may not be so 'cute' when that horse is 1200lbs!" A horse must be taught respect asap. Not being mean, just who is the boss! That way, when he is over 1000lbs he still thinks of YOU as the boss and respects you.

I have raised many stallions. I will not raise a stallion who is over 1 yr old. I have found that they continue to respect you more as they get older and are easier to handle. Kinda like your parents. When you were little, they were BIG and you had to do what you were told. Now that you're big too, doesn't mean you don't listen to your parents. Know what I mean? To a foal, you are an adult member of the herd. If he learns respect from you then, it continues and they don't realize that they outweigh you by a ton!

If you want a colt vs a filly, that is fine. I would suggest that you geld him asap. That way, he doesn't learn what it is to be a man, and you have less problems later. According to my vet, you can geld them as soon as they are both dropped. (check with your own vet and what his/her practices are.) We have had them gelded as young as 3-4 months after they have been weaned.

The book recommended is a good book. Clinton Anderson also has some DVD's that may prove helpful. I would learn all I could about horsemanship in general before purchasing a horse. A foal and an adult is not that different IMO. Good luck and post pics when you get your new horse!
     
    05-11-2007, 12:44 PM
  #7
Foal
I got my experience working with babies when I worked at a few different breeding farms. I learned different ways to handle different situations and years later when I had the opportunity to get my first weanling I was very successful with him. Books and research are great, but they can't replace experience.
     
    05-26-2007, 09:49 PM
  #8
Foal
I think your best way to go is to be its friend but always be one step ahead of it and never let it do anything that you don't want it to do the min it thinks I has gotten away with something it will think that it can do it again....yoor main thing that you want is that the colt respects and does what it is told while it is being handled or in your care. It should think of you as its friend and teacher at the same time.
I no that if you don't correct the colt while its a baby then you may have problems when it come into a stallion...but anyways good luck with is all and yeh the book by John Lyons "Bringing Up Baby"
That is a good book too
     
    06-25-2007, 10:57 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Remember colts can be very difficult to handle especially when they are starting to find their feet and try to dominate horses and people around them.
So so SO true!

Quote:
treating the foal like a big dog. I like to remind people "what is 'cute' now may not be so 'cute' when that horse is 1200lbs!" A horse must be taught respect asap. Not being mean, just who is the boss! That way, when he is over 1000lbs he still thinks of YOU as the boss and respects you.
If only someone had reminded me of this daily - before people started getting injured and I had him gelded...

Anyway, Best of luck to you LisaAnn.
     
    06-02-2011, 03:54 PM
  #10
Foal
Hi, I was wondering if your colt had imprint training? We just had a new colt born this last friday and he loves to mouth everyone. I know we need to get serious with him...he is just so **** darling. I know it will be different when he is 1200 lbs of muscle! :)
     

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