Colt thinks life is a joke, is there hope for us? - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Colt thinks life is a joke, is there hope for us?

This is a discussion on Colt thinks life is a joke, is there hope for us? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Is horsenality a farce
  • Horseability right brain introvert

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-16-2011, 12:15 PM
  #21
Green Broke
Hey, I just checked out the Parelli Horsenality info on their website. I always thought it was a little hokey to be honest, but it's interesting to look at the chart and see I have 3 different horsenality types.

My "good" gelding John is a left brained introvert. He's calm and low energy and confident riding out by himself. Very kind and tolerant, I call him "honest John." You can stick any rider on him and he will carry them safely.

My mare is a right brained extrovert. Very sensitive and energetic and submissive at the same time. Fun to ride and very sweet, but sometimes a spooky, hyperactive horse.

Then Zane, yes, the classic left brained extrovert in EVERY detail. Sigh!

His daddy is a Quarter Horse. I keep saying "Zane, please take after your daddy or honest John. You need a calming influence!" He's got his mom's energy but at least he is bold and not overly spooky. Nothing much scares him really. The world is his oyster!

(Photo below just because I like showing him off. This was went he went down for training and stayed with my friend, so the facilities are not mine unfortunately.)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg zane hanging rope2.jpg (86.5 KB, 103 views)
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-16-2011, 12:31 PM
  #22
jdw
Weanling
Some great advice, as usual! I have raised a foal, but I agree studs are different. I would definitely get him gelded, as a start. Then, you have to allow him to be a playful colt, but set a few boundries regarding respect for you. You must be careful though; you have to realize (as well as him) its his behavior that needs improvement, not his nature. You can TRAIN him to behave a certain way at times (when working) and to be himself at other appropriate times. This will be a tough sell, especially to him, so get some help on training if possible, or buy a book on training foals. Work SLOWLY and CAREFULLY. As someone above said, he is still a baby mentally and physically, though if you don't start getting him taught some respect his physical could become even more dangerous. Foals are never to young to gently learn the principles of respect. (they learn them in the herd!)
     
    04-16-2011, 01:04 PM
  #23
Green Broke
He looks like a decent colt. Gelding. Enjoy him now!
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    04-16-2011, 01:13 PM
  #24
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses    
IMO, you are doing too much with him. Lead, stand, halter - at 9 months that is all I would do. I would never put a saddle on him; not because his back can't take it but because his mind can't. You want him to be 2 years old but he isn't even 1 yet. What you seem to expect is for him to have the mind of a 10 year old child but his mind is only that of a 4 year old. Ever try to get a 4 year old to concentrate? The only thing on their mind is to play.

If he were mine, I would have him gelded and left alone except to do simple things like lead and work with his feet. I'd do that for another year before stepping up his training.
EXACTLY! I agree 100%. LET THE BABY BE A BABY! There's NOTHING more you need to be doing with a 9 month old except for simple things as already suggested.
     
    04-16-2011, 01:28 PM
  #25
Green Broke
Thanks guys!

Something that keeps getting missed in my rambling posts is that he was gelded at 5 months.

I guess I should call him a gelding, but I keep calling him a "colt" because of his young age.
     
    04-16-2011, 01:33 PM
  #26
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
Then Zane, yes, the classic left brained extrovert in EVERY detail. Sigh!

(Photo below just because I like showing him off. LBE's are charismatic!
I'm so happy that you got over "horsenalities are hokey!" & see what a classic LBE your guy is! (as well as finding what your other horses are!)

In answer to poster who asked why an LBE wouldn't be reprimanded, it's a whole area of study, & I recommend that you get the horsenality information to get your question answered in full. I will say that in PNH, there's not much reprimanding with any of the 4 main horsenalities, because one understands what motivates the horsenality & so uses motivation, to cause the horse to be interested in what you're asking, & to ultimately want to cooperate. It's cooperation from the horse based upon him enjoying the partnership, rather than fear of reprimand.
     
    04-16-2011, 01:38 PM
  #27
Green Broke
Trailhorserider while yes taking him to seea trainer and making him pivot and all that stuff is a bit more then what most people do, I don't see it as asking to much, I was ponying my little colt at just a few weeks old! He even lays down on command. And I wish my guy acted more like a baby! He acts so grown up that I think he's missing out on his baby years lol. I think just keep at teaching him not to bite, my little sparta after he finally dropped got to be really "saucy" and would paw, kick and bite, I slapped him either in the chest for biting, on the leg for pawing and kicking, he got it after doing it once or twice. Your guy just seems a little hard headed! And I wouldn't give up, you know zane loves you he's just had a wonderful life all this time and knows to expect nothing else. Definitely don't give up, but maybe since your guy is so different he may need time to be a bbay, all horses are different and should be treated as such.
     
    04-16-2011, 05:06 PM
  #28
Yearling
Have you ever considered that he's spent so much time with you he may not realize he is getting bigger then you??

I have always put my young horses with other horses who would put them in their place. Not beat up on them but when they get snotty with their elders the give them a good reprimand. It's something my trainer used to do with all her young stock. It's one of those things where horses learn to be horses by being with them, dogs learn to be dogs by being with them...you get where I am going ;)

Just my 2 cents. I am not in to parelli or any natural horseman ship persay...not if it's associated with a specific name ;) But I am into common sense horsemanship. You will find what works for you!
     
    04-16-2011, 06:21 PM
  #29
Started
I disagree with everyone saying you've done too much with him. Imo it varies by horse, and he certainly doesn't sound like his brain is fried by any means.

I have 2 colts (now both geldings). One is almost a year (apr 30th) and the other will be 2 may 7th. Both of them stand for the farrier, clip (ears/face and body), x-tie, longe. The 2yo had a saddle on his back girthed up and all when he was a year. He's been longed over a raised cavaletti. And he's jumped 2'6". He was also on a trailer and travelled 3h by the age of 7mo.

Now before everyone freaks out, he jumped 2'6" on his own when there was a jump in the ring and I was letting him run around (his pasture was muddy). He did that with no encouragement from me whatsoever - and will jump anything he can find to jump because apparently he likes it (good for me since I bred him to be a jumper haha). He was body clipped to help him shed out - didn't mind it at all. He was trailered to go to the OLD NA inspection - the nearest one was 3h from me.

They are longed once - twice a month for just a few minutes so as not to strain their joints.
I started messing with them with the clippers very early on so neither of them have any issues with the clippers.

And I don't believe there is such a thing as "too much" with a baby when it comes to handling and training exercises with regards to doing different things (obv longing every day for an hour is too much - I mean with regards to new experiences). The more I can expose my youngsters to now when they are smaller and easier to handle, the easier it will be to do more with them when they are mature. Both will have bits in their mouths soon too - not to ride of course, just to get a feel for something in their mouth.

Most importantly I feel that you gauge your horse's ability to take new things based on their reaction. My guys love training time because they both enjoy learning new things. They also have weeks in between to "just be horses" so as to not stress them out. Every horse is different and some need more or less handling than others.

As for the mouthy part - or really ANY disrespectful behavior, i'd sure rather reprimand now when they are still small then try to stop a 1,000lb horse who bites because he thinks it's a fun game.

It may sound crazy but when my now 2yo was 3 mo old he thought that when he didn't want to do something that rearing and/or throwing himself on the ground in a temper tantrum would get his way. He was my first colt that was 100% mine to handle/train so I called my friend who's family is a well known WB breeding establishment and asked what to do. She said sit on him. No joke, sit on his shoulder so he can't get up and when he stops kicking and fighting and the tantrum is over, count to 3 THEN get up and let him get up. I thought it sounded crazy but figured they know their stuff so I tried it. We only had to do that twice - the first time was a nice easy 10 min. The 2nd time was over an hour - I called her to ask how long I do this for and she said as long as it takes. Guess who no longer kicks, rears, or throws temper tantrums? Yup. Worked great. The yearling has never needed that fortunately - he never has tried to kick, rear or have a temper tantrum, but for the WB well it def worked! And he's not injured, scared, and nothing negative came out of it. Actually he was SO mad he "lost" the argument, that he didn't get up for another minute or so after I got off him! Now he'll stand w/o a halter or lead, and will lead by his mane, etc.
     
    04-18-2011, 01:06 PM
  #30
Green Broke
First off, thanks to everyone for being so supportive and offering great advice!

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilkitty90    
......... and I wish my guy acted more like a baby! He acts so grown up that I think he's missing out on his baby years lol.
I'll trade 'ya for mine!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CecilliaB    

I have always put my young horses with other horses who would put them in their place. Not beat up on them but when they get snotty with their elders the give them a good reprimand. It's something my trainer used to do with all her young stock. It's one of those things where horses learn to be horses by being with them, dogs learn to be dogs by being with them...you get where I am going ;)
If I get a chance to put him in with some other horses, I think that may be the best thing for him!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ82Sky    
it may sound crazy but when my now 2yo was 3 mo old he thought that when he didn't want to do something that rearing and/or throwing himself on the ground in a temper tantrum would get his way. He was my first colt that was 100% mine to handle/train so I called my friend who's family is a well known WB breeding establishment and asked what to do. She said sit on him. No joke, sit on his shoulder so he can't get up and when he stops kicking and fighting and the tantrum is over, count to 3 THEN get up and let him get up. I thought it sounded crazy but figured they know their stuff so I tried it. We only had to do that twice - the first time was a nice easy 10 min. The 2nd time was over an hour - I called her to ask how long I do this for and she said as long as it takes. Guess who no longer kicks, rears, or throws temper tantrums? Yup. Worked great.
I did that with Zane twice out of desperation. The first time was (the only) time he turned his butt and kicked at me. It was too muddy to run him around or round pen him in any way, so I tied his leg up and turned his head around until I got him to drop down, and I sat on him for like 20 minutes. The second time he was a lot older and larger and he started thrashing and I couldn't keep him down.

It's not something I would try again. It did help the first time though- he never kicked after that.

Zane would throw himself down in a fit when I first started halter breaking him too. He was only like a month old. Thankfully, he seems to outgrow that phase!
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is he actually correct or just thinks he knows everything? Gidget Horse Tack and Equipment 16 07-25-2010 03:51 PM
when not contagious, is Ryle out there, hope,hope Juniper Horse Health 11 06-04-2009 10:53 AM
who thinks this is a bad way to fall? librahorse94 Horse Riding Critique 6 05-29-2008 10:32 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0