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Completely stumped with this one- aggressive horse threatening to charge

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  • Aggressive horse should he be destroyed
  • Standardbred race horse aggressive

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    03-15-2012, 12:16 PM
  #11
Weanling
I agree with HERDBOUND if situation cannot be fixed by experienced trainers ( Try to find one that deals in strictly problem horses ) then the alternative is to put them down. It would be sad but too many really good sane horses out there.
We had a Standardbred race horse that was a great money earner. With lifetime earning of 250,000 by the time he was 4. But he had one really bad habit severe agressive behavior on the ground. I have gotten one too many bad bites where I bled threw 4 layers clothes. I tolerated it for a long time but he got worst. This horse was never mistreated nor spoiled. He was just whacked. One day he charged at a groom walking by his stall and actually busted down the door knocking the groom over and breaking his left arm and two ribs. That was it we had him destroyed that day. Its sad but it happens.
Im sorry about your situation. Its not a easy one
     
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    03-15-2012, 12:17 PM
  #12
Trained
To OP: If you are ever considering putting this horse down because of this then ship her to me and I'll fix her.
Coconut likes this.
     
    03-15-2012, 12:20 PM
  #13
Weanling
Also will add It just takes once for something bad to happen.

Definitely do not ignore it. And if this horse is really agressive when a object is held How is carrying something going to help ( Hense whip broom bucket ) talk about poking a growling bear.
     
    03-15-2012, 12:25 PM
  #14
Trained
When he sees you carrying a broom around and nothing happens to him and he's not getting growled at or beat upon then he'll realize that there's nothing to fear from the broom or bucket or shovel or one-man-band. It's not my first rodeo, I've been around a fair bit and have seen quite a few horses like this. If you reprimand the horse then you are enforcing the fact that something bad happens when someone comes around with something in hand.

I'm dead serious about my offer. I'll even split the shipping costs but I want a bill of sale.
     
    03-15-2012, 12:27 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Sounds like a fear issue. I went after my rooster with a shovel this morning while checking the chicken's water and he decided I was aggressive, so I went back in with my grain shovel. I warned him that my dog was just outside and he'd make a good meal--I have another rooster, btw.
I'm not off-topic. The rooster is protecting his flock, and the horse is protecting himself bc of past abuse. They don't come with a diary, ya know. Nobody sells their best horse. BUT, people sell their problem horses. Guess the previous owners were lucky bc this horse has a successful show history. Often problem horses have a list of problems as long as your arm.
PLEASE BE CAREFUL!!! If you want to spend time desensitizing him and you see progress, then I agree that you can turn him around. If you see no progress, then I agree with herdbound. Your problem is far different than my gelding's startled reaction yesterday bc I came around the corner into the shelter leading with my shovel.
     
    03-15-2012, 12:30 PM
  #16
Foal
I was just wondering does he get this aggressive when you have a bucket or shovel in hand just when he is in the stall or barn? Just wondering because if that is the case I would probably start by doing a lot of work outside first in the round corral or on a lead rope. Could be that he had a bad experience in a stall or a the cross ties and since he is in such a confined space then maybe he is just trying to defend himself. Just a thought but could be some place to start.
     
    03-15-2012, 12:52 PM
  #17
Yearling
This could be something else to try. I would tie some of the objects in his stall (securely of course) start with them against a wall, if/when that isn't an issue, try tying some from the ceiling at a level where he's not going to get poked in the eyes or something, but where he can't exactly completly avoid them either. It's no different then desensitizing in and arena with you holding on. I've found most horses associate their stall with their "happy/safe" place. Start to include those items with that safe place. Using a fork as an example, walk into his stall, pretend your not paying any attention to him, place it in the nearest corner you feel safest going to, and walk out. Wait a bit, go back in & take it back out, keep repeating trying to put it closer each time. If there's not a medical reason for the "phobia" he should, in theory, eventually put it together that it's not actually a killer shovel,whip, fork, etc. Don't give him a reason to be aggressive towards the items.

BUT, like the others said (and I've unfortunately experienced this) it may be an issue that is unresolvable, and the best option may be PTS.
     
    03-16-2012, 07:49 AM
  #18
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
When he sees you carrying a broom around and nothing happens to him and he's not getting growled at or beat upon then he'll realize that there's nothing to fear from the broom or bucket or shovel or one-man-band. It's not my first rodeo, I've been around a fair bit and have seen quite a few horses like this. If you reprimand the horse then you are enforcing the fact that something bad happens when someone comes around with something in hand.

I'm dead serious about my offer. I'll even split the shipping costs but I want a bill of sale.
I commend your bravery and I see a softer side to Kevin I am kinda shocked by your compassion towards this animal in a way. I have learned in my experiences with horses thus far that MOST of them can be "fixed" as you say BUT I have also learned that some can't...some just have a crossed wire or something and it just comes down to risk versus gain. I wouldn't want to be legally responsible for this animal thus I wouldn't ask anyone else to do it. BUT if you are willing to take on that sort of liability just to save an animals life it speaks volumes about your character. You are a sweetheart...awwwweeee. I wonder though if they are capable of just being "off in the head" like people can be. Like the Charles Manson's & Jeffrey Dahmers of the human species...where maybe not even from their own doing...something in the brain just doesn't click or is misfiring and no amount of "therapy" can rectify the damage. I have only my own knowledge pool to dip from. I have worked with a lot of horses and only seen a couple that were just to far gone to "save"...that TWH is one. Just something ain't right with her. The best way I can describe it is she "pretends" to be trustworthy and then snap and you are in trouble. Like I said I wouldn't want to own the responsibility of an animal like that...I would put it down...but more power to anyone who trys to "save" it...just let me know where its at so I can stay the hell away from it ;)
     
    03-16-2012, 08:14 AM
  #19
Trained
Agree totally with Kevin.....again.....

As a sidenote-Timberridge-is there a reason why you bold your posts? It makes it seem like you are shouting at us, and/or you think that what you have to say is more important and anyone else. Just asking. Thanks. Back to the topic now....
     
    03-16-2012, 08:52 AM
  #20
Showing
Is this horse getting plenty of turnout where he can just be a horse with other horses? When people are carrying things he may be associating it with feed, that should be for him (in his mind). Horses can be quite food aggressive. Does anyone ever stop and let him check it out? Keep in mind, when he is in cross ties you have completely removed his ability to escape a perceived enemy. I don't tie mine. Knowing they can escape, they stay. Be careful of when you pet him as he may see this as a reward and the bad behaviour may escalate. Keep a lunge whip handy when you enter his stall. If it's a box stall, wave the whip side to side toward his chest and back him to the far wall. Only when he will stand quietly do you give him his feed. Keep him back until you leave the stall. In time he will move to the wall. His kicking out may have been more of a gesture to keep the neighbor horse away from his feed. If he should turn his rump toward you just start tapping on it with the whip, don't hit him. Horses find the repetitive tapping annoying and will move away from it. We want him to trust that you will not inflict pain or this might show up in the show ring.
     

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