Could she just be in heat? I don't really want to have to move him. =(
 
 

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Could she just be in heat? I don't really want to have to move him. =(

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  • Molly mule behavior in heat
  • Molly mule in heat

 
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    09-29-2009, 08:47 PM
  #1
Yearling
Question Could she just be in heat? I don't really want to have to move him. =(

So I went out to see my gelding tonight and found the gate shut between the two pastures. Him and his new girlfriend were seperated. Come to find out that he's been biting her back, chasing her away from the food, rearing up at her, etc. Yesterday they were the best of friends, grazing together, playing together, what have you, as they have since he came home two and a half weeks ago. They've been inseperable.

So that's why I thought his behavior was so odd. And it changed so suddenly. He whinnies for her to come to the gate and when she does, he pins his ears and freaks out. I couldn't even get a lead on him without him pulling me around everywhere. The only thing that came to mind was that she could be in heat? Is it possible that that could be the cause of his behavior? I hope it's not that they just don't get along anymore because I would hate to have to move him so soon.

Help.
     
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    09-29-2009, 10:57 PM
  #2
Yearling
This time of year, she shouldn't really be cycling but she might be one of the few who likes to have the odd heat out of season. Are there any other changes going on that would change the attitude? My gelding and his lady had a major change of roles after their first week together. She was the boss at first and now he beats her up terribly, but only at feeding so we've solved it by putting out separate piles of hay and separate buckets of beet pulp.
     
    09-29-2009, 11:14 PM
  #3
Trained
Feed them seperatly and let them work it out.
     
    09-30-2009, 12:46 AM
  #4
Yearling
I don't know, but just wanted to say my mare is still coming in, she was in heat last week. When we have a fairly mild Winter most of our past mares (I only have the one right now, well, and a 2 year old molly mule, but I've never seen her in heat) would come in year round. Don't know if that would cause the geldings behaviour, but I wouldn't completely rule it out, our gelding is in love w/ my mare, but even more when she's in heat! No aggression or anything.
     
    09-30-2009, 02:58 PM
  #5
Yearling
They had been giving the horses each 3 cobs of hard feed/bait corn (still on the cob; I posted a thread about health issues, too) in the afternoon, but the last time they got any was on Saturday night. And this behavior started on Tuesday morning.

Oh also, the mare cycles almost year round sans some of the coldest months of winter. It's not too chilly here yet.

Kevinshorses - They tried that. He chases her away from the hay pile even when there's more than one. He'll rear up at her and bite her..
     
    10-03-2009, 09:54 AM
  #6
Yearling
Bump. Any idea, anyone?
     
    10-03-2009, 03:54 PM
  #7
Trained
Are there any other horse combinations that can be tried? Sometimes geldings can be pretty mean to mares, or vice versa. I had a really nice QH that I raised, and when I moved him to a different facility, he ripped into every gelding there, even when the geldings were separated from the mares. So sometimes these things just happen.

I would see if you can't try different horse buddy combinations. Otherwise as long as he can see another horse, he doesn't 'need' a buddy, especially if he's going to be mean to another horse.
     
    10-05-2009, 11:01 PM
  #8
Yearling
They are the only two horses there. =/ The problem has become semi-resolved - Now he only bites at her when the hay gets put up. It seems to be generally okay if they get their own hay piles. Each day it gets a little better, so we think she might just be in heat? I'm not sure. Ughh. Frustrated.
     
    10-07-2009, 12:50 AM
  #9
Trained
I would try to make sure the hay is put fairly far apart then...if he has to walk some distance to get to her he may just leave her alone, or atleast she has some time to get away from him before he gets to her.
     
    10-16-2009, 12:33 AM
  #10
Yearling
The problem has arisen again. They get along fine after the hay has mostly been eaten up. We feed them in completely seperate fields (but the gate is left open) so it is some distance he has to walk just to bother her. But he does. And now she has all these scars on her back from him biting her. I feel so terrible for her. They are and have been seperated now for a while. Until further notice. He only bothers her when she goes to eat. Once both hay piles are primarily gone, they get along fine. I'm so afraid this isn't something that can be resolved..
     

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