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Cow Hopping Horse

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        11-14-2011, 12:55 PM
      #31
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Poseidon    
    ...You know, you aren't required to be here. There are plenty of other internet forums you are free to join if you are unhappy here.
    Ewww!

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    Think about how you would treat a school ground bully..
    I must say that a horse who crow hops isn't always even trying to dump the rider, but rather is just "feeling her oats", expressing exuberance/playfulness. I knew a mare who'd crow hop like that occasionally, when I was a kid. Her riders'd just laugh & the hops were easy to sit. The difference is that OP said that the crow hopping fills her with apprehension, so then the horse picks up on that, regardless of its original intent in hopping, & then "takes over", because somebody's got to be the leader in horseland.

    I thank those who gave me "likes"!

    Oh, yes: how to ask permission to mount the horse: You say, "May I have permission to mount you?" Horse'll often answer, "Climb aboard!"

    Seriously, (& as I said, one must have the horse's respect first "on the ground"), one squares off the horse's feet so he's stable, gathers rein properly in the mane, lifts off, leans torso over horse & strokes opposite shoulder, checking his eye & body tension during, & when horse's eye & bodily relaxation invite you to, you then swing your leg over. Hope that helps!

    Once you tune into it, you can see how a horse may not be ready to be mounted, & it's just rude to ignore those signals, & naturally very destructive to the rapport that you want with him.
         
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        11-14-2011, 02:26 PM
      #32
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Northern    
    Oh, yes: how to ask permission to mount the horse: You say, "May I have permission to mount you?" Horse'll often answer, "Climb aboard!"

    Seriously, (& as I said, one must have the horse's respect first "on the ground"), one squares off the horse's feet so he's stable, gathers rein properly in the mane, lifts off, leans torso over horse & strokes opposite shoulder, checking his eye & body tension during, & when horse's eye & bodily relaxation invite you to, you then swing your leg over. Hope that helps!

    Once you tune into it, you can see how a horse may not be ready to be mounted, & it's just rude to ignore those signals, & naturally very destructive to the rapport that you want with him.
    Count me in the group of people who tell their horse it is being ridden. There is nothing about this expression:
    http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y50...1112111136.jpg
    That says "Yes, please ride me!" But you know what? We're going to ride and she's going to deal with it. After we get going, she's chewing and is entirely willing to work. I'm not going to wait around until she decides she feels like doing something.
         
        11-14-2011, 04:20 PM
      #33
    Green Broke
    Why the hell would I ask?
    I have my horses respect and obedience and in exchange he is protected, cosseted, rugged up to the eyeballs, fed and groomed, his every need is catered for and he never wants for anything. I will go hungry before he does!

    I have a very good relationship with him, this pony will walk past anything because he trusts me. He comes galloping to the gate to greet me, I always get a whinny in the morning. Today I mounted him in the pitch black because the yard lights were not working, I rode him round to the school past diggers, cows and geese with only moon light to see by and then I rode into the school and switched the lights on whilst on him. He has never been in a flood lit school, nor has he ever been ridden in the pitch black. But he trusts me and because I said it was safe he went. We got some beautiful work and he was working with me not against me.
    That is how a relationship with a horse should be. You are boss, you are the smarter animal, you know the crisp packet monster isnt going to suddenly start eating ponies therefore if you say it is nothing to be worried about then they don't worry.

    Just to make it clear my pony loads first time every time, he will happily stand on tarpaulins, wear a plastic sack over his back, I can hang plastic bags from his ears. The first time I took clippers anywhere near him he had a full clip out and the worst he did was try to eat the clippers whilst they were running. He will stand on boxes, walk chest deep into water, through ditches and hedges without flinching. All this and he is only 4 yrs old.

    Never had any parelli anywhere near him!
         
        11-14-2011, 04:31 PM
      #34
    Banned
    'Ask permission' implies that I'll go away if the horse says no. Yeah, fat lot of good THAT'S going to do him!

    If there's something wrong physically or he's in pain because of an illfitting piece of tack, I'll take care of it. Him being a prima donna and deciding he just doesn't want to work doesn't cut it.

    I don't want to work either, yet I get my carcass out of bed in the morning and haul myself to a job so I can feed and house my horses.

    This 'ask permission' garbage is just another way for timid, middle aged women to say they CAN'T ride today, because Pookie isn't in the mood. Couldn't possibly be because they're afraid of the animal. No, it's all about lurve, respect, and a majickal bond!!!!

    Pookie will let them know when they get it right, and then they will ride off into the sunset together, farting rainbows in perfect harmony.
         
        11-14-2011, 05:07 PM
      #35
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
    'Ask permission' implies that I'll go away if the horse says no. Yeah, fat lot of good THAT'S going to do him!

    If there's something wrong physically or he's in pain because of an illfitting piece of tack, I'll take care of it. Him being a prima donna and deciding he just doesn't want to work doesn't cut it.

    I don't want to work either, yet I get my carcass out of bed in the morning and haul myself to a job so I can feed and house my horses.

    This 'ask permission' garbage is just another way for timid, middle aged women to say they CAN'T ride today, because Pookie isn't in the mood. Couldn't possibly be because they're afraid of the animal. No, it's all about lurve, respect, and a majickal bond!!!!

    Pookie will let them know when they get it right, and then they will ride off into the sunset together, farting rainbows in perfect harmony.
    Stop being amazing. I'm going to die laughing over here.
         
        11-14-2011, 07:25 PM
      #36
    Trained
    ROFL, we'll all be drinking the free Bubble Up and eating that Rainbow Stew...and farting rainbows and singing leprachauns!
         
        11-14-2011, 08:46 PM
      #37
    Started
    OP I'm sure is quite clear that there are the BOSS human & the PARTNER human groups, now, so I'll just have some fun:
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Poseidon    
    Count me in the group of people who tell their horse it is being ridden. There is nothing about this expression:
    http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y50...1112111136.jpg
    That says "Yes, please ride me!"...
    Wow, you got THAT right!

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faye    
    ...I have a very good relationship with him, this pony will walk past anything because he trusts me...
    Never had any parelli anywhere near him!
    faye, you've never used a carrot stick, but you've implemented PNH principles, because good horsemanship is not absolutely reliant upon carrot sticks, but much more reliant upon universal principles like Love, Language, & Leadership.

    [quote=Speed Racer;1232968]'Ask permission' implies that I'll go away if the horse says no.

    No, it means that you'll make the effort to discover why the horse doesn't want you on his back, because the fact that he doesn't want you on his back shows that something's amiss in the relationship.

    I don't want to work either, yet I get my carcass out of bed in the morning and haul myself to a job so I can feed and house my horses.

    Your horse doesn't care, nor should you expect him to weigh those facts & decide, upon their basis, to repay you by "giving back". He cares about safety, comfort, play & food, because he's a horse.

    This 'ask permission' garbage is just another way for timid, middle aged women to say they CAN'T ride today, because Pookie isn't in the mood. Couldn't possibly be because they're afraid of the animal. No, it's all about lurve, respect, and a majickal bond!!!!

    Yes, Pat Parelli is nothing but a timid, middle-aged woman!

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ShinaKonga    
    Stop being amazing. I'm going to die laughing over here.
    Please don't die; your horse'd miss his BOSS so!

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians    
    ROFL, we'll all be drinking the free Bubble Up and eating that Rainbow Stew...and farting rainbows and singing leprachauns!
    You skate on thin ice, Dreamcatcher: your Arabs are reading your BOSSING words!
         
        11-14-2011, 08:57 PM
      #38
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Northern    
    Yes, Pat Parelli is nothing but a timid, middle-aged woman!
    No, Pat Parelli is a guy who obviously doesn't practice what he preaches..... I don't think the colt that dumped him, gave him permission to mount!
         
        11-14-2011, 09:05 PM
      #39
    Trained
    NdAppy likes this.
         
        11-14-2011, 09:56 PM
      #40
    Started
    OMG that pink panther is so CUTE!

    Troubador gave him permission to mount, just not to keep the lead too tight, for that Spin City routine! ;)
         

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