Crazy Horse, attacks lunge whip and people
 
 

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Crazy Horse, attacks lunge whip and people

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    03-09-2008, 03:44 PM
  #1
Foal
Crazy Horse, attacks lunge whip and people

Hello there!
I work daily with "problemed" horses in Spain, and I have finally found my match:P
This horse is a huge, 17 hh, andalusian and basically he is crazy.
I love him dearly, but the other day I was lunging him and he actually turned around and attacked the whip! He snatched it from me and basically tore it to pieces! I laugh quite a bit when I think about it, but it is pretty serious.
In his past he has killed a mare and a gelding, thus he doesn't get to stand in a paddock with other horses and I can't go on a hack with other people and there horses... heck, I can't have him near people, he gets up on his hind legs n starts trying to trample everyone and everything in sight. He even went bonkers the other day and started trampling a leaf like crazy:S was pretty scary sitting on him, as he then went buck crazy and fell to the ground.
He is breaking my heart, I have got him so far now (I mean.. I can ride him), but his owner wants to put him to sleep.
Anybody have an idea..? I'm thinking of buying him, but I know he is dangerous.. and it's a miracle that I he hasn't hurt me in anyway... but I don't know.. any ideas..?
     
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    03-09-2008, 03:46 PM
  #2
Showing
Is he a stallion? How much would you buy him for?
     
    03-09-2008, 03:56 PM
  #3
Banned
Ditto to what DressageIt said...is he a stallion? If he is then, the problem will be harder to fix. A stallion should be kept in a seperate pasture/paddock away from geldings and especially mares.

How old is he? How long has he been acting like this?
There can be ways to stop it, but then it might not work. Honestly, I'd send that horse out to a real professional trainer that has handled horses like that before. It's too much of a risk for you to try to break that horse's habits, and it's a risk just having the horse act that way at the stables.

If he's perfect with you, but not anyone else...ask to buy him from the owner instead of the owner putting him down. Or suggest that the owner sell him instead of putting him down. I'm sure there are people out there that want a challenge

First I'd just work with him on the ground. I wouldn't ride him until he's fine on the ground. Do you think he's "attacking" stuff out of boredom...fear....anger....pain....or something else? If he continues to do that I'd more than likely call a vet and see if there's anything mentally wrong with the horse and rule that out first.

Then just slowly working with him. It will take patience...and lots of it from the sounds of things
     
    03-09-2008, 03:58 PM
  #4
Foal
No he is actually a gelding...
And I think the owner would let him go for 500 euros, but then again he paid a lot for that horse, and knowing him he might try to con some poor person. I can pay up to 2500 euros for him, but I am not sure if I can take responsibility for his actions.
     
    03-09-2008, 04:05 PM
  #5
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebel
No he is actually a gelding...
And I think the owner would let him go for 500 euros, but then again he paid a lot for that horse, and knowing him he might try to con some poor person. I can pay up to 2500 euros for him, but I am not sure if I can take responsibility for his actions.
find out when he was gelded. If he was gelded late in life he could just still believe he's a stallion.
Try talking to some professional trainers and get some pointers and tips from them..see what they've done in the past to prevent stuff like that.

It will be a HUGE responsibility especially if he isn't changed quickly. You'd definitely want damage insurance (if you can get it) so that if the gelding does break something/hurt something/kill something that you will be at least partially covered.

If you don't want to buy him, sit down with the owner and remind him of how much he actually paid for that horse, and suggest getting a professional trainer out. It will cost money, but usually they can at least start to correct the problem
     
    03-09-2008, 04:05 PM
  #6
Foal
He is 15 this year and has been acting like this for 10 years. 4 out of 5 vets say he is crazy, but I have been working with him for 2 years and I believe that he just does it coz he's bored. He hasn't got mental problems I am sure, people just misunderstand him.
And two trainers have had a go at him, the first was badly injured and the second sent him back after 2 month.
He has come a long way, and I am seriously thinking about buying him and keeping him away from people and other horses for the moment... I just can't cope with him attacking another horse, or maybe yet another person.
     
    03-09-2008, 04:09 PM
  #7
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebel
He is 15 this year and has been acting like this for 10 years. 4 out of 5 vets say he is crazy, but I have been working with him for 2 years and I believe that he just does it coz he's bored. He hasn't got mental problems I am sure, people just misunderstand him.
And two trainers have had a go at him, the first was badly injured and the second sent him back after 2 month.
He has come a long way, and I am seriously thinking about buying him and keeping him away from people and other horses for the moment... I just can't cope with him attacking another horse, or maybe yet another person.
if he's been like this for 10 years it's going to be REALLY REALLY hard for you to break that habit...by the age of 15 all his bad habits and training are usually glued in his mind, so it's going to take a long time to fix. Of course though, it depends on the horse.

What did the owner do about the horse for the first 5 years he owned him...did he just let the horse go crazy?

You said you think he does it because he's bored....then don't let him get bored....when you ride him, don't let him stop unless you plan on getting off...keep him going and thinking...collecting, circles, switching directions...keep his mind on YOU...you want him to be "Hmm...I'd better pay attention for I don't know what my rider will ask for next"....and not "I know what the rider is going to tell me to do, so I'll do what I want in the mean time".
     
    03-09-2008, 04:11 PM
  #8
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebel
No he is actually a gelding...
And I think the owner would let him go for 500 euros, but then again he paid a lot for that horse, and knowing him he might try to con some poor person. I can pay up to 2500 euros for him, but I am not sure if I can take responsibility for his actions.

Honestly, he would be a HUGE liability. A horse that attacks people and has a track record of killing other horses is not to be taken lightly.
To be honest, and in my own humble honest opinion, putting him down might not be such a bad idea (alright, I'm bracing for all the "but you can work through it! Don't listen to JDI! Comments, and let 'em rip, but hear me out) because:
- what if the horse ends up in the wrong hands? Who is going to get hurt? If the owner might pawn him off on some innocent person, I would rather see the horse dead than the person and/or more horses. (*waits for kick-back of comment*)
- It will take a LOT to get him to be a "safe" horse. Even then you won't ever be able to completely trust him
- A horse that goes crazy and attacks a leaf? Something's not right in his head, and may never be right.

Personally, I wouldn't want the liability. What if he gets out of a pen someday and goes nuts? Sure you can work him, but in the end, if there's something mentally wrong with this horse, training will NOT change it. Drugs might, but it will always be in the back of your mind that he is capable of terrible things. It's not in a horse's nature to just kill unprovoked - which brings me to my next question: how did he kill the mare and gelding? What provoked the attacks?

As said above, if he's put to sleep, you won't ever have to worry about him getting in the wrong hands and doing more damage. YOU know his history, YOU can handle him, but sooner or later, someone else will have to handle him for one reason or another - can you take that chance with a clear conscience?
     
    03-09-2008, 04:14 PM
  #9
Showing
Re: Crazy Horse, attacks lunge whip and people

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebel
and it's a miracle that I he hasn't hurt me in anyway

= not a safe horse, period.
     
    03-09-2008, 04:29 PM
  #10
Foal
JDI.. I know what you are saying, and it would be the best.
And it must come across that I'm just keeping him alive for some kind of self satisfaction, as I have become so attached to him.

But I have hope for him somehow, he has come such a long way.

And I mean, he is in the wrong hands at the moment (not me, but his owner), if he just gets away from that owner he might settle a bit too. I mean, his owner shouts and is a complete psycho.

And I don't really know the reason for the killing.. and I know that it isn't in a horses nature to do such things. But I still have hope for the bugger.

There is something about him, he doesn't seem to do it in spite.. he just seems to b a bit cheeky and go to far, I know I know.. sound sick haha:P But at times, he is the most loving horse you will ever meet, and at times he is a beast.
And I say that he seems to do it due to boredom, because it is kind of logical. All he does is stand in all day, and the only time he gets to go out is once a month with his owner and 3 times a week with me. Otherwise he is in his box at _all_ time. He's not aloud to run around in the paddock on his own coz he tries to jump the fence:/
I'm not sure, but I want to give him another chance.
But there is still that liability, he might do something and then I just can't take can't b responsible. I really have to think long and hard on this one...
     

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