Crossing Obstacles - Page 2
 
 

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Crossing Obstacles

This is a discussion on Crossing Obstacles within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        01-04-2010, 05:45 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    That's fine mls - then as a trail rider, that means staying home and not endangering yourself or anybody else because you're to "proud" to ask for help. The people I speak of are not people who were interested in actually helping themselves. The girl actually informed me it would "stress her mare out to much" to get her to accept scary objects. This same girl advertises herself as a horse trainer. If you want to endanger yourself, fine, stay at home and behind a fence where you're not a menace to everyone else.
         
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        01-04-2010, 06:02 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    Good posts ReiningTraining. This could help a lot of people if they read it.
         
        01-04-2010, 06:59 PM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj    
    That's fine mls - then as a trail rider, that means staying home and not endangering yourself or anybody else because you're to "proud" to ask for help. The people I speak of are not people who were interested in actually helping themselves. The girl actually informed me it would "stress her mare out to much" to get her to accept scary objects. This same girl advertises herself as a horse trainer. If you want to endanger yourself, fine, stay at home and behind a fence where you're not a menace to everyone else.
    I know someone just like that! Not a girl, a mature woman. When she boarded at the barn I volunteered at, what a show! The BO had a little donkey as a farm mascot. Well the woman had a fit when riding in the arena (and that's the only place she'd ride, fine, but as a "trainer" give me a break). Apparently the horse was nervous of the donkey that was grazing on the lawn nearby the arena.

    To me, that would have been a prime opportunity to work on despooking/exposing said horse to something new. But not her, we had to take poor little Eeyore and lock him up in a stall.

    Saw her at a show a couple of times. WOW! Horses breaking halters pulling back over anything coming by them. Poor horses probably all needed a tranq. Just to get through the day!
         
        01-04-2010, 07:05 PM
      #14
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    However in the real world - not eveyone has the ability to train a horse out of or teach them to handle a 'scary' situation.

    I have always told my students and boarders - if they are uncomfortable or feel the horse cannot handle the situation, they are welcome to avoid the potential injury to body or mental status.


    .
    People have to do what they feel is right for them. For ME I do it the way I post but for OTHERS they have to do it their way. I can not post any other way but I hope to encourage people to try harder, expect more from their horse.
    If the rider is in over his/her head then by all means back down or don't try it in the first place.
    I take someone under my wing so to speak and they far exceed what they ever thought they could accomplish.
    It's in all of us, we just have to bring it out
         
        01-05-2010, 12:35 AM
      #15
    Foal
    Everyone does have the ability to train a horse, with the right tools and knowledge. Anyone that comes in contact with a horse is indeed training it, for good or bad. Yes, more good experience lends to faster results, but I tell my clients that they will get the same results as I and they will tend to do even better as they have a relationship with their horse that has developed over time and that is priceless.

    I totally agree that a persons safety comes before anything else and there is no shame in dismounting, turning back, getting help or avoiding a situation that an individual feels they cannot overcome.

    Sadly, not everyone knows they can learn how to help themselves and their horses grow or they do not have the desire to learn how to change themselves in order to change their horse. I know several people that seem to thrive on problems and have no real desire to see them go away and that is a true shame.
         
        01-05-2010, 12:39 AM
      #16
    Foal
    Thank you Southerncowgirl, I hope it will.
         
        01-05-2010, 12:43 PM
      #17
    Foal
    If the horse is balking at something its usually because they are not confident in themselves or their leader--the human.

    In order to effectively deal with the problem and gain a positive outcome in the saddle requires a human who has a good seat and is a fundamentally sound rider. Unfortunately the majority of riders do not have the skill set required.

    Becoming uncomfortable only reinforces the horses first instinct of "HOLY S___T!!"

    I am a firm believer in ground work. I always work with the horse on the ground--over tarps, log piles, stuff scattered all over the arena and water on the ground first. Clinton has some really good excercises to help with this problem.

    If you have worked with these excercises on the ground and you find yourself in a balking situation in the saddle that makes you uncomfortable--get off and solve it on the ground.

    If you are comfortable and understand that the key to a good outcome is control of the feet and getting the horse to focus on you and what you are asking instead of the "HOLY S__T!" then solve it in the saddle. Start 20 feet away, ride parrallel to the HS and turn on the hind quarters in a figure eight--remember two horses--left eye and right eye. Keep getting closer and closer to the HS--wait until the horse is calm and listening before you move closer--and pretty soon they will be in it, thru it or over it.

    Remember that if you approach it with the "I have all day" attitude it will take 5 minutes. If you approach it with the "I have only 5 minutes", it will take all day.
         
        01-05-2010, 12:58 PM
      #18
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 5cuetrain    
    If the horse is balking at something its usually because they are not confident in themselves or their leader--the human.

    In order to effectively deal with the problem and gain a positive outcome in the saddle requires a human who has a good seat and is a fundamentally sound rider. Unfortunately the majority of riders do not have the skill set required.
    Exactly the point I am trying to make. There are some people out there who are content to be a casual rider. They do not want the challenge or frustration of teaching a horse something new. Again - some are not physically or mentally able to handle a horse that does more than walk in a straight line. Does it annoy me? It used to. Now I can accept people as they are. I step in when I need to and help when asked. But I certainly do not expect everyone to be able to ride like I do or have their horses do the same things mine do.
         
        01-06-2010, 02:34 PM
      #19
    Foal
    5cuetrain, I agree to the fact and did say a person should dismount if they are uncomfortable and it is always best to work lessons at home before taking it to the trail. I set my example to riding as this was in answer to a question asked me in a different post.

    I was addressing crossing obstacles and in the case of balking I too would use a different lesson using a 'v' approach/retreat or if there is room, I would work the horse in a circle far enough from the object so he is comfortable and would be making all kinds of requests as I slowly move the circle toward the object. Before he realizes what happened I will have made him better at least 10 other lessons as well as gotten him to and past the object.

    Great thing about all these lessons is that they are completely interchangeable and can be combined if needed. The more tools you have the better you can become at fixing things.

    Love your final line, that sums it up great.
         

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