Dangers of riding a strange horse.....!
 
 

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Dangers of riding a strange horse.....!

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  • Getting on a strange horse
  • Riding+a+strange+horse

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    08-20-2012, 03:45 AM
  #1
Foal
Dangers of riding a strange horse.....!

I have only been in this forum for a couple of weeks, and in this time I have read quite a lot of posts about folks having trouble with new arrival horses...

Why o why are so many of you folks eager to climb on this strange horse as soon as you can...?

Many many horses are sold because of one reason........ said horse has caused grief to a previous owner.....

Ask yourself.... how many horses are sold by an owner who is bombproof and a dream to ride in traffic,,, unphased with a brass band marching by etc etc...

Answer.... not MANY... these owners hang onto these horses,

Generally horses that are for sale are either unwanted, unridden, or a danger... and you as the unsuspecting buyer falls in love with its colour and the fact that when you went to look at it, you saw it in its home enviroment calm and collected...

Please.. please... do not climb on a strange horse, until you... yes you... not your trainer etc. but you.. have done quite a lot of ground work with your new horse..

If you are unsure what this entails, google horse groundwork training,,

You must gain manners and your horse able to accept your commands from the ground before climbing on...

If the horse has no respect for you on the ground, guess what may well happen if you climb on and kick it in the ribs...

Trust me.. I have ...over my life time ...fully tested the "human unaided flight" theory and it always ends the same....... dumped on the ground..!

Personally, I take on troubled horses, and wont actually ride some of them for almost a year.

I take them thru a quiet retraining program and give them time to adjust to a new home..We use other bombproof horses to help retrain new horses..

I wont climb on a strange horse before I have full voice command from the ground or off another horse beside this one and until this horse has accepted me as its leader, .. the horse will decide this.... if and when...!
     
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    08-20-2012, 04:02 AM
  #2
Trained
If it's a horse I am looking to buy or a hrose someone is lending me, I want to see them ride it first unless I knew it before my time to ride it.

If it was a horse in training it would depend on the situation. Is the horse there for tune ups? Has it been causing problems before? WHY is it there to train?

I would be a little irritated if every friend I let ride my horses insisted on doing a bunch of groundwork first. Just get on the darned horse already!

If it was a horse I was bringing home for the first time I would ride it the first day. Why not? I will be expecting to haul this horse to about three new places a week and I won't have time to give them "settle down" time before I get on. Not always a place to do groundwork either.

As far as groundwork = respect under saddle, I disagree. Groundwork helps, that I will NEVER deny, but my older gelding is a dipstick on the ground but under saddle he is the best horse you could ever ask for. While our other gelding is a star student on the ground but awful under saddle. There are other factors that play into saddle work and behavior than just respect. I.e, learned habits, pain, environment, etc. Respect helps all these things but will not eliminate them.
     
    08-20-2012, 04:20 AM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by SorrelHorse    
If it's a horse I am looking to buy or a hrose someone is lending me, I want to see them ride it first unless I knew it before my time to ride it.

If it was a horse in training it would depend on the situation. Is the horse there for tune ups? Has it been causing problems before? WHY is it there to train?

I would be a little irritated if every friend I let ride my horses insisted on doing a bunch of groundwork first. Just get on the darned horse already!

If it was a horse I was bringing home for the first time I would ride it the first day. Why not? I will be expecting to haul this horse to about three new places a week and I won't have time to give them "settle down" time before I get on. Not always a place to do groundwork either.

As far as groundwork = respect under saddle, I disagree. Groundwork helps, that I will NEVER deny, but my older gelding is a dipstick on the ground but under saddle he is the best horse you could ever ask for. While our other gelding is a star student on the ground but awful under saddle. There are other factors that play into saddle work and behavior than just respect. I.e, learned habits, pain, environment, etc. Respect helps all these things but will not eliminate them.
I would be interested in you hoping on either one of the two most recent rescue horse we have without any ground work...

One in particular.... the previous owner just bought it three weeks earlier, and guess where he is still now......?

In hospital after this new horse bolted... he tried to turn it causing it to start rodeo bucking while galloping back to its paddock next to our place..

Please....be my guest...............Come ride it now!
     
    08-20-2012, 04:35 AM
  #4
Green Broke
I won Grand champion on a horse I'd never sen in my life.

I used to work for a broker. I didn't have time to sit around and do ground work, most of the time, the horse was right out of the trailer.

By the way, I had a mare that would buck at the canter, the years of ground work never fixed it.
     
    08-20-2012, 04:45 AM
  #5
Trained
I'm sorry please bold where I said anything about rescue horses. If oyu look back on what I said about training horses (Which would be on the same level of rescue horses to me) I stated I would evaluate the situation. I stated right in my post that I will never deny groundwork helps and is a tool for under saddle. All of my horses and horses that I am working with for other people get groundwork. With the exception of my older gelding but he's more of a "I need this horse to drag around this two year old for a few minutes" type horse. If he was doing more work, yes I would tune him up more, but he is not.

How I would assess the situation with a rescue horse is I would take them in the roundpen first. Then the lunge line yielding and changing direction. Yielding hindquarters/forequarters, sidepassing down the fence, sending on flat and on obstacles saddled and unsaddled, I would flex the horse, expect backing up, directionally as well. Usually around cones. All horses that come to me learn to do those things as well as a few other things.

Then, when it came time to ride them they get treated like unstarted colts. I'll lay on them bareback quite a bit in this groundwork phase so when I get on in the saddle no problem. Usually they will get ponied behind a horse like my older gelding who has been-there-done-that. Then we will take the older horse away and go around on our own.

I also fail to see where you got the whole "every horse sold is a problem horse except for on rare occasions."

Go on craigslist...Barrelhorseworld...reinersworld...dre amhorse...You will see a LOT more good horses people can't afford than bad horses people are trying to get rid of. You'll see a lot more "bad" horses being sent to slaughter or euth'd because no one will take them over the good horses!

So, yes, if I buy a horse I'm going to bring it home and get on it with no groundwork. Just like I would when I rode it at the owner's house. If I did buy a fix-er up-er, I would treat it like a colt who knew nothing. Not every horse requires a ton of groundwork before you get your butt in the saddle.
     
    08-20-2012, 04:50 AM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by myhorsesonador    
I won Grand champion on a horse I'd never sen in my life.

I used to work for a broker. I didn't have time to sit around and do ground work, most of the time, the horse was right out of the trailer.

By the way, I had a mare that would buck at the canter, the years of ground work never fixed it.
This.

My mare now that I love to pieces and is the most wonderful horse in the world is a wonderful groundwork student.

A year ago though, first time you asked her to lope she would explode. She didn't need groundwork. She was a spoiled brat who needed her *** smacked a few times with my crop because she learned that her rider would stop whenever she bucked.

So, being the one who is good at this type of thing, got on and did just that.

A year from then she is the model horse. Packs kids around. Extreme trail challenge obstacles. Drug my three year old into the creek the other day. Ropes, moves cows, runs barrels, does dressage, etc. Just a wonderful, wonderful horse. And all because she finally got put in her place under saddle.
ernie5567 likes this.
     
    08-20-2012, 04:52 AM
  #7
Green Broke
I regularly ride horses that i've never sat on before.

Actually quite a lot of horses for sale are good honest horses who are stars under saddle and are only for sale due to a change in the owners circumstances that means they can no longer afford to keep the horse.

I took stan to a show 3 days after he arrived on my yard, I had sat on him once (when I went to try him) and took champion at a show.

I rode a horse at a show where I had 5 mins to learn him before I took him into a championship (and won!)

I too would be offended if everyone who came to try my horse did ground work with him. It has its place with difficult and dangerous horses but the vast majority of horses need very little if any.

Jeff my new horse I sat on when I went to try him without having seen him ridden previously. I worked him in the school, took him for a hack and popped him over a couple of XC jumps all within 20 mins of sitting on him for the first time.
When he came up here he had 1 day to settle in as I was working late tht evening and then I have ridden him every evening since.

Not ever horse for sale is for sale because it is bad to ride, maybe in your price range they are but 90% of the horses actualy for sale are not!
     
    08-20-2012, 05:13 AM
  #8
Green Broke
I agree with the others. Ground work has its place but it does not always mean that a horse who has 20 mins of ground work done before riding will behave any better. Some horses are amazing with groundwork but still act like cows under saddle that could be due to being green, pain or just being confused.
My current lease mare is green in that she has all the training just needs the miles. I hopped on her the first day I actually went to see her with just 5 min little lunge to let her get her funnies out. Hadnt been ridden in 3 weeks as a green 6 yr old she did amazing and was fully in control the entire time.
I havw hopped on countless other horses without seeing them ridden first and I havw seen tons of quality good trained horses being sold simply because times are hard and money gets tight mot because the horse is bad.
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    08-20-2012, 05:19 AM
  #9
Weanling
As a breaker and one who people send spoiled horses too I will confidently say that a few moments of leading around and checking out how an unfamiliar horse responds to a person flapping the stirrups around, slapping the saddle and getting the right response from rein pressure while standing beside the horse has prevented more problems than its caused, and usually takes less than 5 minutes.

There's a happy and safe medium between spending your life doing groundwork and diving straight into the saddle expecting it to all go well.
     
    08-20-2012, 05:36 AM
  #10
Foal
To clarify, Personally we take in horses that have caused previous folks grief,... I also restart OTTB type horses...

My good riding friend Rob bought the above mentioned horse from an auction.... the previous owner said it hadnt been ridden for a while...(I don't know how long a while was)

Rob said it looked a nice calm horse before he bought it..

He got it to his place and the first ride a couple days after it was ok.. no issue.. he didnt do much at all ground work, but the second ride he was on it about 15 mins when a truck went past and the horse just bolted,, He said he tried to pull its head around to break the bolt, but it started a rodeo bucking frenzie at a gallop back towards the paddock.

Rob is a good rider who can stick in the saddle well, but not many can out ride this situation.

Rob is still in hospital and has given said horse to me. He doesnt want it..

This is the type of horse that I personally treat as unknown even before this incident.
I am not talking about horses that you know, ride, and trust..

I read on here people buying for example horses off the track and wanting with little experience to get on these horses as soon as they get them home...

One post from a retrainer of OTTB horses is constantly amazed at inexperienced people rolling up to buy these and getting seriously hurt...
     

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