The dangers of teaching your horse to rear. - Page 3
 
 

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The dangers of teaching your horse to rear.

This is a discussion on The dangers of teaching your horse to rear. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Teaching a horse to rear up
  • Cavalia

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    07-06-2012, 08:54 AM
  #21
Yearling
In my opinion, a rear, untacked from the ground, if cued, is ok. I'm not up there to be crushed, and with a lead rope, I can help tell her when its to far. From the ground, I can also ask her for the angle I want her body at. 45 degrees to the ground, with squared up legs, or up like hidalgo pawing the clouds.
I agree that horses should never be taught to rear under saddle, or with a bit in their mouth, and if ever they rear with a rider on them, I would recommend a good getting after. But an attentive, well trained rear on the ground is just another fun trick. Same with laying down, without a saddle of course. But that's just my opinion.
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    07-06-2012, 08:58 AM
  #22
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
I don't have feelings about people teaching their horses to do tricks, one way or the other. It's their horse, not mine.

Very true, but these people doing it just because they think it's 'cool', may someday need to sell the animal. Even if they don't ever sell, there's the probability that someone who doesn't know about the 'cool' tricks is going to get hurt when they unwittingly cue the animal.

Unless someone's a professional trick trainer, I don't know why anyone would want to teach their horse stupid and dangerous things that may eventually turn into avoidance behaviors.

It's neither 'cool' nor 'cute' to teach horses stupid pet tricks. If you want to teach an animal tricks, get a dog.
Again, I agree. To me that goes back to the fact that no one should train a horse to do anything if they don't know how.

As to someone buying a horse who has been taught to rear, well that's the risk you get when buying a horse. You can lessen the probability of getting a horse like that if you buy from a trainer or a reputable farm, etc. but it's always a possibility that you are going to get a horse that has bad habits (or even dangerous ones)due to the previous owner.

Anyway, I agree with you. :)
     
    07-06-2012, 10:08 AM
  #23
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
I don't have feelings about people teaching their horses to do tricks, one way or the other. It's their horse, not mine.

Very true, but these people doing it just because they think it's 'cool', may someday need to sell the animal. Even if they don't ever sell, there's the probability that someone who doesn't know about the 'cool' tricks is going to get hurt when they unwittingly cue the animal.

Unless someone's a professional trick trainer, I don't know why anyone would want to teach their horse stupid and dangerous things that may eventually turn into avoidance behaviors.

It's neither 'cool' nor 'cute' to teach horses stupid pet tricks. If you want to teach an animal tricks, get a dog.
This! We have discovered that Yahzi has been taught to rear, she has a verbal and physical cue which, NOW THAT WE KNOW, we can avoid as much as possible, but the fact is we had purchased her with NO knowledge of this training. The people we bought her from also had no idea - which means it was at least two change of hands ago that someone had the brilliant idea of putting this into her training. We are working on re-training and have not had any serious issues since we finally figured out what was causing the rearing - but leading up to that there were some very dangerous moments, and I now understand just why the person we bought her from sold her.
     
    07-06-2012, 10:38 AM
  #24
Weanling
I think the vast majority of people have no business teaching their horses to rear, because the vast majority of people aren't very knowledgable, experienced horsepeople. I have seen many people (not that I know personally, but that I've seen) teach their horses to rear, but those were people like Stacy Westfall and the riders/trainers at the Arabian Nights show in Orlando - all people who are extremely knowledgable and strong enough riders to be able to have that kind of control over their horse.

I personally would never teach it, and it bothers me a little when people watching me ride tell me to: "Make it rear like the horses on the movies!" and then the next second ask me: "Can I get on your horse?" Not on your life, buddy. I'd never teach or allow my horses to be taught to rear because
A) why would I EVER need a horse to rear with me? It 'looks cool', sure, but then I guess so does living in a wheelchair if an accident ever happened doing it
B) how do I know a habit wouldn't be made out of it (like I've heard happen many times)? It's ok to rear one second but not the next? I spend a lot of time trying to teach my horses to respond to clear, consistent cues and be calm and consistent themselves...why would I want to add an element of danger and uncertainty in the name of a 'cool' trick?
C) I would never be able to trust the horses with beginners (or beginners with the horse), even if we did manage to get the rear as one clear, consistent cue used at no other time
All of the above apply because I'm not professional or very knowledgable and experienced - I know I would very probably run into problems if I did so.

I don't see the point in a rearing horse. It might look cool to the untrained bystander, but to me when I see a rear (cued or not) it just looks terrifying, because I am fully aware of how easily that horse could go over backwards.
     
    07-06-2012, 10:39 AM
  #25
Banned
But but but.... if I train my horse to rear, I can post a video on youtube and look like a cool horse whisperer why my amazing abilities.
     
    07-06-2012, 10:48 AM
  #26
Green Broke
The first time I had a horse rear on me he went right on over. I was lucky enough that he twisted last minute so he fell to the side and only damaged my knee. We were at a gymkhana and he got claustrophobic at the gate and only had up. It was the first time anyone had seen this horse rear and he never ever attempted it again.

My current horse has started to get hoppy at gates even when there is no one around. I was planning on bringing her to a fun show this year just for the experience of crowds but I absolutely will not have her rear so it will wait til next year after I have had plenty of time working with her and gates.

I will not tolerate a rearer and will not get on one known to rear.
     
    07-06-2012, 11:53 AM
  #27
Banned
Teaching a horse to rear either in hand or under saddle is moronic. I don't care how in control the handler believes themselves to be.

Unless the animal is being trained for the movies there's no reason, other than irresponsibilty and immaturity of the owner, to train such dangerous behaviors.

No TRUE professional would think that training a horse to rear is a good idea.
themacpack and wyominggrandma like this.
     
    07-06-2012, 02:11 PM
  #28
Showing
Rearing is obviously very dangerous and I would NEVER teach it myself. However, there is a small handful of people that can teach it while maintaining their training in a controlled environment. One of those people, in my opinion, is Sylvia Zerbini.

I watched her performance at the Fantasia show this spring during the Ohio Equine Affaire. She started with one Arabian in the ring and had someone send in more and more until she had nine in the ring at once. It was absolutely incredible. She had them weaving in and out of each other, all laying down and bowing on command, and would let them all canter in a circle around her until she twisted her whip, at which point they would all stop and spin twice around before cantering off again. She also taught them to rear.

However, she's the EXCEPTION, not the average horse owner, and she has trained them in such a way that it will not be used as an evasion in the future.


     
    07-06-2012, 02:51 PM
  #29
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsygirl    
i am someone who nearly died from a horse rearing and flipping over on me, NOT on command. I would never ever teach a horse to rear. Had I not been wearing my helmet I would CERTAINLY have lost my life. As it was my doctors were shocked that I don't have brain damage - my helmet literally broke in half. I had to be taken in a med flight helicopter into the city hospital. I was in the hospital for 3 weeks, because until that time I was unable to stand or walk. Once I could walk again I went home. I was still so dizzy I could barely see. Could not ride or do any physical activity for 6 months. I was lucky that I didnt die.

Please please please don't teach your horse to rear !
So sorry gypsy. So glad you are ok!
     
    07-06-2012, 03:22 PM
  #30
Banned
Equiniphile, that trainer as you stated, is the EXCEPTION. Those horses are trained specifically for Cavalia and won't be sold on when it's time to be retired from the show.
themacpack and equiniphile like this.
     

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