The dangers of teaching your horse to rear. - Page 5
   

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The dangers of teaching your horse to rear.

This is a discussion on The dangers of teaching your horse to rear. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Teaching a horse to rear while you are on its back
  • Teach a horse to rear with rider videos

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    07-06-2012, 10:18 PM
  #41
Trained
Ricci is a wonderful horse. She is solid, virtually bomb-proof, I can put beginner riders on her, timid and scared riders, children, anyone. She is perfect, no vices. She has spooked mildly one time in the five years I've had her. She has never bolted, she has never bucked [okay, she kind of tries sometimes when she's feeling frisky, but you can sip a full cup of coffee on her back when she's doing it], and she never rears. Has never thought about rearing. I don't even know if she realizes she can. Why on earth would I want to teach her that UP is an option?! It's not!

And for the argument of "on the ground is okay," I think it's just as stupid. You still risk a horse coming down on top of you. You risk getting struck by their front hooves. You risk getting knocked over. It is JUST AS DANGEROUS as when they rear while you are riding them, just in different ways. Not to mention, it also teaches your horse that UP is an option when it shouldn't be.

Gracie is a green broke four year old I've had since 7 months. I have done all her training. If Gracie ever really rears, I will beat the snot out of her until she gets down, and promptly call a trainer. I'm good with horses. I am not that good. I highly doubt there are many people who are.

Just a bad, bad idea. I agree with Speed. If you want to teach a pet tricks, get a dog.
     
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    07-07-2012, 12:46 PM
  #42
Weanling
That video was rather confusing. Most of the clips (well, all of them, from what I could see through the editing), were complete accidents, of horses spooking or misbehaving. The riders all seemed unprepared and did not look like they asked the horse to rear. All horses rear. It isn't actually something that has to be taught. All horses buck. Again, it isn't something that has to be taught.
Stallions rear at each other to challenge. My mare does that as well.
Yes, you can get squished. You can also get squished when a horse bolts and slips, or falls over a fence, or trips on concrete, or knocks you over when he sees an umbrella.
A well-balanced rear is pretty safe. Did anyone ever stop to think that a conditioned, well-trained, well-balanced horse who has been taught to use his body correctly, probably is much safer to be on if he ever decides to rear, than some crappy, ill-trained, unmuscled horse with zero balance? If you horse can do a correctly balanced canter in self-carriage, I think he has a better shot of staying upright than the beast who's currently 4-beating around the arena cause he has no idea how to use his hindquarters.
Anywho, the rider often contributes to accidents as well. A lot of riders get taken by surprise and lean back when the horse rears, even pulling on the reins. Yeah, um, you just threw 150lbs backwards and then pulled. What do you think is going to happen?
I'm lucky that I automatically respond to a rear by leaning forward, following the movement. I can do it without thinking and that's awesome for me. Other people have to train for that same response.
My own horse knows how to rear on command. She does it because it's fun. However, she has been trained not to do it unless I ask. She's also not used as a riding horse, so there's no danger of a rider getting squished anyway.
     
    07-07-2012, 08:23 PM
  #43
Trained
Rascal, no one is denying that a well-trained horse is less of a risk. We are saying that so many people with NOT ENOUGH EXPERIENCE think it's COOL to teach their horse to rear, and this can, and likely will, lead to disaster. They are not teaching the horse a collected, balanced, controlled rear, they are teaching "up." The argument is that unless you are working at the Vienna Riding School [or whatever it's called] or similar, you have no business teaching it to your horse. The average horse owner IS NOT experienced or talented enough to take on something like that.

As to why everyone is confused on the choice of video, yes, they are rears caused by spooks or confusion. The point is showing how dangerous a rear can be. By teaching ANY horse to rear, you teach it that it is okay to rear when handled. Period. I used the example of my horse, she doesn't think "up" is an option if she gets scared or confused. If she or my other horse reared, I would make them think they were going to die because rearing is not okay. But if I had taught my horse to rear on command, it is not far fetched for her to think "oh, up!" in a moment of confusion because, after all, I've asked her to do it before.

In my personal opinion, teaching a horse to rear is like teaching a dog to bite. Dangerous, moronic, and a recipe for disaster. Unless you are training a police dog or training for one of those riding schools, I don't think you have any business training this behavior.
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    07-07-2012, 10:09 PM
  #44
Started
I will NEVER teach a horse to rear, and a rearer is my #1 'deal-breaker' when it comes to getting a horse.

I've never had a horse go over backwards with me, but I've seen it happen and I have had horses rear with me. NOT FUN!

My mare broke a halter when tied because she got starled and went up and over. She also went up and over with three of my family members. She's reared with me twice... once for no reason (and I got after her good for it) and once because it thundered and sounded like a gunshot went off beside us (she's gunshy). Hasn't reared in years now.

My cousin's mare reared with me twice... once bareback because I aked her to go somewhere she didn't want to and once undersaddle for that same exact reason. Both times she got the snot beat outta her. Never reared since.

An old horse of ours that we no longer own used to do 'mini rears' when we took off at a gallop. He's go up about ten inches and then take off. Never got him out of it, but he never has gone hiher than a foot and he only does it when he's cued to gallop. We don't own him anymore, though.

Teaching a horse to rear, both on the ground and undersaddle, IMO, is plain dangerous, stupid, and should be left to the professionals.
     
    07-08-2012, 03:19 PM
  #45
Yearling
The clips in the video used aren't the point, although I recognize some of the clips. Some of the horses in those videos have, in my opinion, been taught (or at least encouraged) to rear, while on the ground or under saddle.


Skip to 1:29. Though there are other examples of dangerous behavior called "cute" or "funny" and the riders not getting after the horse for things they should, this is one of the more clear examples to me. Search on YouTube for other such videos and clips if you need more evidence.

In my opinion, teaching a horse to rear is dangerous and has no point. Even if you do it on the ground. What if you're riding, and you or someone else accidentally cue the horse? And you fall off or something worse? Even if you're just scratched or bruised, suddenly the horse thinks that rearing under saddle is a good idea because it can get him/her out of work, etc.
     
    07-08-2012, 03:32 PM
  #46
Yearling
Horses will rear naturally if they feel threatened or aggressive and even in play. Our herd (two Thoroughbreds, an Andalusian, and a Percheron/Standardbred) always runs around, rears at each other, and tries to yank each others' halters off. They do it in good fun. However, we don't teach them to rear around us, we highly discourage any rude behavior from them.

That being said, I saw the Spanish Riding School mentioned. We practice Classical/Spanish Dressage. While rearing looks pretty and exciting, we don't teach our horses that kind of thing.
     
    07-08-2012, 03:41 PM
  #47
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reno Bay    
Horses will rear naturally if they feel threatened or aggressive and even in play. Our herd (two Thoroughbreds, an Andalusian, and a Percheron/Standardbred) always runs around, rears at each other, and tries to yank each others' halters off. They do it in good fun. However, we don't teach them to rear around us, we highly discourage any rude behavior from them.

That being said, I saw the Spanish Riding School mentioned. We practice Classical/Spanish Dressage. While rearing looks pretty and exciting, we don't teach our horses that kind of thing.
If I'm not mistaken the SRSoV teaches what they call a levade. Isn't that just a controlled rear?
     
    07-08-2012, 08:32 PM
  #48
Trained
Yes, the levade is a very controlled, very collected and very difficult movement/rear for the horse. The horse remains very low to the ground, with front legs tucked tightly into the body and a huge amount of bend through the hind limbs. This is a movement that only their top, most talented stallions will perform, and takes years upon years upon years of training and conditioning in highly collected work, for the horse to become strong and balanced enough to perform it.

A bit different from the joe blow average horse owner that thinks they're a hero for teaching their horse to stand on its back legs, usually with straight limbs behind which makes the rear quite unbalanced, even if said 'wonder trainer' says it's controlled.
     
    07-08-2012, 08:37 PM
  #49
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
It's only cool if you wanted to be the monkey footed girl in daisy dukes posted on the fugly blog....
I sprayed coffee on the screen, I am at work too. LOL
     
    07-08-2012, 08:42 PM
  #50
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by uflrh9y    
If I'm not mistaken the SRSoV teaches what they call a levade. Isn't that just a controlled rear?
Where did I ever say that the Spanish Riding School as a whole doesn't teach their horses that? I didn't. You clearly didn't understand what I said and made assumptions. That's okay. It happens.

We, at this particular farm, do not.
     

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