Definition of Experienced Rider? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 38 Old 08-21-2010, 01:53 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilruffian View Post
I'd say you're a beginner. An intermediat (i'd say, in general) is someone who can handle a horse pretty well for the most part. They are good at catching, saddling, making the horse walk, trot, lope, gallop as well as slow down & stop all on their own. They're also able to balance &keep their seat through all the paces.
An experienced rider would probably be someone who is good at handling many different horses of different experience levels in any situation, as well as being good at solving problems & training from both ground & saddle.
Not everyone knows everything, though, & there is always more to learn.
This is just an overal statement lol. Not a rule by any means.
thank you so much you actually answered the whole question

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post #12 of 38 Old 08-21-2010, 01:54 PM
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Ok guys, I'm sorry, I came out pretty mean but I just really hate it when kids think they are really good and start "training" a pony and buy their own horse with no experience.
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post #13 of 38 Old 08-21-2010, 01:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPhorsemanship View Post
Ok guys, I'm sorry, I came out pretty mean but I just really hate it when kids think they are really good and start "training" a pony and buy their own horse with no experience.
I think that is a fair worry as this user has listed that they own a 2 year old horse in their profile

Edit: I totally understand the fascination with wanting to be "experienced" and good right off the bat. I think most children are that way - I totally was! My parents were always having to remind me that no... I wasn't just as good as the people on TV just because I was starting to jump in lessons XD

I think it's much healthier to enjoy your time around horses, whatever you can get, and do your very best to learn all you can without being obsessed or focused on labels or what you can or cannot tell other people about how great you are.




Last edited by Deerly; 08-21-2010 at 02:00 PM.
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post #14 of 38 Old 08-21-2010, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Tessa T View Post
Well I have no way to say if that's beginner or not, but that's what I would say? I'm kind of in the same boat. Lol I am going on a beach ride next Saturday, and the stable is going to ask if I'm a beginner, intermediate or advanced rider in order to match me with the right horse. I don't know if I should say beginner or intermediate.

I have ridden several ponies as a child.
I rode a 15.2hh horse when I was 8, and I also showed her in halter. I used to trade stall cleaning and grooming for lessons which lasted about 6 months.
I then started helping a neighbor with her horses at about 10. I rode their 13.3hh pony bareback and slid off several times. He was finicky and he never took over the situation so they said I had potential.
Then I rode their 16.0hh bareback as well with a halter and lead and had some good gallops. I did this for about a year.
I got my own horses when I was 13, but they were ponies and too small to ride. One of them went to a friend of mine who raises minis to learn how to drive and I rode her huge 17.hh horse maybe three times? I have had Anthem for about 2 years now and haven't ridden since I was 15. I'm 18 and still remember what its like, but I'm not sure how I rate, so I'm kinda where you are lucky2008. Sorry I kinda commandeered your thread, but I'm also curious where I stand on the horse riding skill scale.
I have been riding for 16+ years and I still tell the people at trail riding/beach riding stables that I am a beginner. In my experience, when you tell them you are anything but, you will spend your whole ride fighting a hard horse and not enjoying the ride. Its much more fun to get yourself on a push button horse who just wants to do his job and go home.
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post #15 of 38 Old 08-21-2010, 02:00 PM
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I wouldn't put a time frame on anything either lol. I know people who've ridden/ even owned horses for years but are still beginners because they never ride! One girl inparticular who had horses since she was a young kid, but most werent broke or she only went riding with friends (never alone) who to this day can't handle a horse going faster than a trot!
I think that you can easily move from beginner to intermediat fairly quickly if you ride alot & have the proper guidance. Everyone's different though.

"If a horse fails to do something that is because he was not trained to do it. If a horse fails to do something properly that is because he was not trained properly."
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post #16 of 38 Old 08-21-2010, 02:02 PM
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Originally Posted by corinowalk View Post
I have been riding for 16+ years and I still tell the people at trail riding/beach riding stables that I am a beginner. In my experience, when you tell them you are anything but, you will spend your whole ride fighting a hard horse and not enjoying the ride. Its much more fun to get yourself on a push button horse who just wants to do his job and go home.
Too true lol. They always want to give you the difficult ones!
I know a not-too-smart guy who went riding at a stable once (he had been on a horse all of 2 times in his life) & when the guide asked whatexperience level he was, he (being a cocky lil bonehead) told him experienced!
Ha! Let's just say it didn't go well for him

"If a horse fails to do something that is because he was not trained to do it. If a horse fails to do something properly that is because he was not trained properly."
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post #17 of 38 Old 08-21-2010, 02:03 PM
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Thanks, corinowalk. I feel that way too. I have ridden bolting, anxious horses before and I would rather not have to deal with that when I'm trying to relax. Lol

There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man. ~Winston Churchhill
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post #18 of 38 Old 08-21-2010, 02:03 PM
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beginner= just started riding, learning

Advanced beginner= can ride walk, trot, canter on a good horse and has basic knowledge of grooming and tacking up a horse.

Beginner intermediate: Has a more solid seat, walk, trot, canter. Knows more about horse care, tacking up, and riding. Can do jumping and can ride a more difficult horse. The should also have good ground skills.

Intermediate: Starting to ride with an independent seat, learning about contact, impulsion and balance. Learning how to get the horse on the bit. Can jump higher now and handle hot horses on the ground and in the saddle.

Advanced intermediate: Riding the horse on the bit that is already trained, can jump higher(if they jump). Can handle a hot horse, learning to ride with their seat more. They can get a horse better on the bit. They can start learning about training horses and can be properly riding green horses and more advanced horses.

Advanced/experienced: Have been on many different horses, have excellent skills on the ground and in the saddle. Can ride much more difficult horses and do more advanced movements in dressage or jump higher. Have a sense of balance, impulsion, and are collecting horses. They also have knowledge of nutrition, first aid, training, lunging, use or training aids properly.

Expert: can handle any horse, train horses.
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post #19 of 38 Old 08-21-2010, 02:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Deerly View Post
I wouldn't really consider those three things qualifications for a rider. In my experience those rental horse trail rides and sitting on a horse as a passenger is a far far cry from really "riding" one.
That made me laugh! I definitely agree though.

I think everyone understand it in own way. Say, if you can't ride dressage, or don't know how to post, or can't run the barrels, but can manage (successfully) a bucking or rearing horse or ride through the bolt, does THAT make you a good rider? And in opposite I've seen dressage and jumping riders on competition, who couldn't stay on (or barely could stay on) when a horse gave a REAL buck couple times in row. Does THAT make them bad riders?
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post #20 of 38 Old 08-21-2010, 02:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPhorsemanship View Post
beginner= just started riding, learning

Advanced beginner= can ride walk, trot, canter on a good horse and has basic knowledge of grooming and tacking up a horse.

Beginner intermediate: Has a more solid seat, walk, trot, canter. Knows more about horse care, tacking up, and riding. Can do jumping and can ride a more difficult horse. The should also have good ground skills.

Intermediate: Starting to ride with an independent seat, learning about contact, impulsion and balance. Learning how to get the horse on the bit. Can jump higher now and handle hot horses on the ground and in the saddle.

Advanced intermediate: Riding the horse on the bit that is already trained, can jump higher(if they jump). Can handle a hot horse, learning to ride with their seat more. They can get a horse better on the bit. They can start learning about training horses and can be properly riding green horses and more advanced horses.

Advanced/experienced: Have been on many different horses, have excellent skills on the ground and in the saddle. Can ride much more difficult horses and do more advanced movements in dressage or jump higher. Have a sense of balance, impulsion, and are collecting horses. They also have knowledge of nutrition, first aid, training, lunging, use or training aids properly.

Expert: can handle any horse, train horses.

A lot of this stuff makes sense, but what if the person riding doesn't consider jumping a qualification to be an advanced/experienced rider? Or did you mean an advanced rider would be able to hold on if a horse jumped over something? And you also have to remember all horses are different. And the nutrition and first aid don't seem like part of riding to me unless your horse needs first aid on the ride. It seems more like general horse knowledge.

There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man. ~Winston Churchhill
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