Disciplinary measures for Agressive Horses?
 
 

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Disciplinary measures for Agressive Horses?

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  • aggressive horse in stall

 
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    01-06-2011, 05:15 PM
  #1
Weanling
Disciplinary measures for Agressive Horses?

So, I am the type of person who HATES hitting for discipline. I will do it, but I hate to do it constantly. So I'm wondering what methods other people have found then hitting to control aggressive horses?

I found that bullying in the stall, or on cross-ties(the aggressive horse I know has a dominance issue with anyone he feels he can top, so he is constantly challenging humans). I usually bully with the "finger curl" on the face if I can reach, if not, the shoulder(my reasoning is that is where horses will discipline each other, so that's my alternative to make sure I discipline within 3 seconds).

I brought this up mostly because I, being the passive person I am, seem to be destined to do all my testing on the dominance issue pony *sigh*(I like my clever and crazy horse who the leaser is now riding on my lesson day)...anyway, I find because I am mean enough with my disciplines if he is ridden in the lesson before me, I run into troubles when I'm finished with him(i.e I was backing out of the stall when I took off his halter, and he decided he was going to "chase" me out with his ears pinned)

Sorry for the paragraph
     
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    01-06-2011, 05:31 PM
  #2
Foal
I'm going to put a disclaimer up right from the start and state that I've only been working around horses for about four months...so I am -so- not the authority on this. However, one thing that I've learned from the fantastic trainers I have is that each person has to figure out what works for them, so sometimes finding out how to respond to a horse's antics takes a lot of experimenting.

I work around 30 horses...stallions, fillies, colts, mares and geldings...all with different personalities. I do find that the stallions are the more challenging set so I tend to pay particular attention to them so I can learn.

A few things I use:

- The firm, strict mommy voice. It's not mean...but it gets the point across. Horses are very in tune with pitch and tone of human voices. If you use this voice when they start acting up, they tend to sit up and take notice.

- I use the shoulder a lot...as well as my own body.

- With problem horse children, if you can, try to wear them down before doing any serious work with them. Let them get out the pent up energy and they will usually be much more willing to work with you. I usually try to lunge for a bit to accomplish this.

Those are just a few things that came to mind. =-) I'm sure the more experienced riders will have other ideas.

-CA
     
    01-08-2011, 07:17 PM
  #3
Foal
The problem I am seeing here is that you are thinking like a human in order to try to figure out what your horse is about. Try thinking like a horse, because, after all he IS a horse. I used to see as many different ways as there are trainers to handle aggression in horses. Then I heard a trainer suggest that we need to try to see it from the horse's viewpoint - think like a horse - and the results I have SEEN AND HAD is amazing. I have never had to "discipline" a horse since. And it leaves me with way more tome to train my horse and develop a partnership with him. Freedom is now way more that a well behaved horse - he is my best friend. So pick a book on reading horses - there are a few really good ones out there - and study up on how horses think. I used the Parelli Natural Horsemanship Method, I think it is the best one out there, but there are many programs that study horse behavior and how it impacts horse training.
     

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