Disrespectful colt - Game/working ideas?
 
 

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Disrespectful colt - Game/working ideas?

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    08-02-2010, 04:33 PM
  #1
Yearling
Disrespectful colt - Game/working ideas?

My colt is disrespectful, he gets in your space, is nosy, and likes to hang around you and sniff your pockets. Normally, I wouldn't mind this, but he's not being respectful about it. I don't feel unsafe or uncomfortable around him, he's not a dangerous/suddenly attacking horse, but he doesn't know the meaning of 'give me my space and leave me be'.

He picks up his feet, but he also will throw an UTTER fit about it (huge disrespect issue there). Last time I had the farrier out to shoe him, be bucked, reared, and generally was unsafe to be around. We ended up using a rope twitch just to get him shod (he started getting really unsafe about two shoes in). I've picked up his feet before, but never had him shod. The farrier was extremely patient and gentle about it. He didn't treat him roughly or beat on him, and asked me before hand if I was comfortable using a twitch.

Overall, he was just unhappy about having to pick up and hold his feet. He just didn't want to, so he acted like a child throwing a temper tantrum. Instead of getting a spanking and being sent to his room, he instead was put in major discomfort with the twitch. Normally, I wouldn't use such methods, but I'd rather have him be uncomfortable than have someone get seriously hurt.

He's also difficult to trailer. He refuses to load and has to be pushed and pulled into it.

He isn't good about standing for bathing or fly spray. He'll back ALLLLL the way up, until he's pulling on his halter, stand for a moment, then step forward again.

He occasionally stops dead in his tracks and refuses to lead.


Other than that, he halters fine and he's a cute little horse. When I first got him, you couldn't touch him, halter him, lead, groom him, anything. We've gotten past MOST of those issues (he now catches, halters, grooms, and most of the time, leads) but now he obviously needs to be educated in 'Respect Me, and I will Respect You'.


I think with some true respect training, a lot of his problems-bathing, fly spray, feet, leading, and loading-will either completely vanish or be greatly reduced.


So...can anyone give me some tips on how to go about teaching him such things? Games, or ways to work him?
I'm following Clint Anderson's methods of horse training, but I still have a lot of learning to do. Red Man (my colt) is due to go to the trainers in another month or two to be broke to ride. But I'd really like him to have a good solid ground training base beforehand.

The trainer I'm sending him to is excellent, works very well with problem horses and gives them a firm ground training base before riding. But at the same time, I don't want to shovel his few (probably easily solvable) problems on someone else. I'd rather work with him and learn, THEN send him off to be broke
     
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    08-02-2010, 05:45 PM
  #2
Started
Problems are what trainers are for. They (should) know how how to effectively fix them. That being said, a lot of trainers I know would prefer the completely untouched horse to work with rather than the horses who's inexperienced owner tried to 'fix'. If I were you, I wouldn't try to fix anything that he is doing now, and LAY IT ALL OUT for your trainer, and maybe ask if you could come watch and learn when s/he is working with your horse. Communication is a good thing to have with your trainer. Remember: a horse trainer has to read a horse's mind every day. He shouldn't be expected to read yours. The problemsyou are describing will only get worse and may become potentially dangerous unless you are taught to fix them. You probably will get good advice from some of the people here, but in my opinion:

The best way to learn how to deal with these problems is to be shown, hands on, by an experienced trainer.
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    08-02-2010, 06:14 PM
  #3
Started
Your horse is a left-brain introvert, main attitude is "Make me!" Parelli has much info in their horsenalities on how to be effective with one, & a really short answer is to match his resistive energy plus 4 ounces, with your own oppositional energy. A trainer may have the skill to fix him, but unless you gain the skill, he'll revert to how he was. (true for any horse, but especially for the "make me" type.)
     
    08-02-2010, 06:34 PM
  #4
Weanling
1. You MUST be consistent EVERY time you handle him. 2. When you lead him ALWAYS carry a whip and use it to get him out of your space. (Your description makes it sound like he has no manners or respect for you and your farrier is a saint to put up with him.)
3. Keep training sessions short enough to not exceed his attention span then gradually lengthen them so he develops a longer attention span. This is important for his under saddle work - no attention span now means none during riding unless you start developing it now.

4. Start by leading him - you stand on his left with lead in right hand and standing by his shoulder. He is not allowed to move forward until you step forward. If he does try to move forward before you or walk in front of you, turn and face him and make him back up 2-3 steps. Use whip on chest to get him to back up IF he doesn't back up. If, on the other hand, he lags behind you, reach back with the (long) whip with your left hand (while still facing forward) and tap him with the whip on the butt.

If during this "learning how to walk" session he tries to nibble on you an immediate smack to nose (with your hand not the whip) is in order. I do allow them to chew the cotton lead line as youngsters like to keep their mouths busy - and better a lead line than my arm.

5. Teaching about the hooves sounds like your next lesson, assuming he ties and stands quietly for at least 30 minutes. If not start with teaching him to tie and stand quietly. Then every day tie him and starting with the same foot (I start with front left) work from left to right side - slides hand down leg, squeeze with your hand on his leg while saying "foot" and ask him to raise the foot. Hold for about 5 seconds then allow him to put it down. Cookie time. Repeat and hold 10 seconds. Another cookie. Repeat (less cookies as you go along) until you can hold the leg up several minutes while tapping with a hammer on the shoe, simulating the farrier putting a shoe on.

Suggest you DAILY work with the horse until this issue is resolved.
     
    08-02-2010, 08:04 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valentina    
1. You MUST be consistent EVERY time you handle him. 2. When you lead him ALWAYS carry a whip and use it to get him out of your space. (Your description makes it sound like he has no manners or respect for you and your farrier is a saint to put up with him.)
3. Keep training sessions short enough to not exceed his attention span then gradually lengthen them so he develops a longer attention span. This is important for his under saddle work - no attention span now means none during riding unless you start developing it now.

4. Start by leading him - you stand on his left with lead in right hand and standing by his shoulder. He is not allowed to move forward until you step forward. If he does try to move forward before you or walk in front of you, turn and face him and make him back up 2-3 steps. Use whip on chest to get him to back up IF he doesn't back up. If, on the other hand, he lags behind you, reach back with the (long) whip with your left hand (while still facing forward) and tap him with the whip on the butt.

If during this "learning how to walk" session he tries to nibble on you an immediate smack to nose (with your hand not the whip) is in order. I do allow them to chew the cotton lead line as youngsters like to keep their mouths busy - and better a lead line than my arm.

5. Teaching about the hooves sounds like your next lesson, assuming he ties and stands quietly for at least 30 minutes. If not start with teaching him to tie and stand quietly. Then every day tie him and starting with the same foot (I start with front left) work from left to right side - slides hand down leg, squeeze with your hand on his leg while saying "foot" and ask him to raise the foot. Hold for about 5 seconds then allow him to put it down. Cookie time. Repeat and hold 10 seconds. Another cookie. Repeat (less cookies as you go along) until you can hold the leg up several minutes while tapping with a hammer on the shoe, simulating the farrier putting a shoe on.

Suggest you DAILY work with the horse until this issue is resolved.
So far, I don't have problems with him crowding me when leading. Only when I'm doing something with another horse, he likes to come over (not all the time, but frequently) and get into your space. See if you have something for him, kinda deal. He has more of the 'lag behind' issue then anything, otherwise he is very quiet, and (I feel) very respectful when being led. He doesn't get excited, dance around, or try to nag you. Just walks along nice and easy, at your pace, until he decides 'Okay, that's enough' and stops. He had this problem a lot when we first started, and does it hardly ever (but still does it) now. I use a rope halter when leading him, so he can't dodge pressure when I apply it.
I'll definitely work with him more and bring my lunge whip with me next time and just walk with him around the pasture.

He's also been good about standing tied, no dancing, fidgeting, or calling. He only really gets antsy when I come with the water horse or fly spray bottle. He's gotten much better with the hose, but the spray we're still working on.


He does adore his cookies I'll start on his feet once he's leading well. My mare (for whom I otherwise have no complaints) also isn't really pleased with picking up her feet. She'll pick them up, hold them a minuet, then try to pull them back. Otherwise, not as bad as Red, but not as good as she should be.
     

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