disrespectful horse - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 19 Old 05-29-2012, 12:09 PM
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I started out like you, 'my baby', my 'baby' became a brat our first ride out. My husband kept saying 'smack her with the end of the reign." I didn't do it cause I was afraid to hurt her. Like you, I was determined to help her be the best horse she could be for me and my grandkids to ride. After listening to the people on forum who've had experience, she's a different horse and I am a different rider. I had a wreck a few years ago on a ranch horse after a lightning strike while we were gathering pairs. It took me awhile to get back in the saddle. Duke shied and he would, he is experienced, 17 years on the range and ranch, that strike was too close. I'm the one who fell off. He didn't leave me. He stood right there in stepping in front of those spooked calves til I could get my wind and get up. My husband was so impressed with Duke's savvy. So was I, he probably save my life if not serious injuries until the other riders could get to me. Good luck with Moose, he's worth it, you'll see.
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post #12 of 19 Old 05-29-2012, 12:22 PM
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Just wanted to add that even if you did get a new horse and sold Moose (which I do not think is necessary at this point, especially since you are working to correct it), you would eventually have the same problem with the new horse.

The problem lies not within the horse, every horse will test you and will take advantage of you in some way or another. Some are worse than others. Moose just needs to be taught that you are serious, and that you are his leader. Once that happens, his old training will kick back in and you will get your "good" horse back.
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post #13 of 19 Old 05-29-2012, 12:31 PM
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I think you should keep him, because you can learn an incredible amount here, and the more you'll learn, the better he will be. If you get rid of him, and get another horse, you are likely to create the same problem. If you keep him, you can learn to work through this issue, as long as you have some experienced horse people by your side (it sounds like you do), and are willing to learn and ask questions (it appears you are). Keep at it!
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Last edited by katbalu; 05-29-2012 at 12:36 PM.
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post #14 of 19 Old 05-29-2012, 12:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakotababii View Post
Just wanted to add that even if you did get a new horse and sold Moose (which I do not think is necessary at this point, especially since you are working to correct it), you would eventually have the same problem with the new horse.

The problem lies not within the horse, every horse will test you
and will take advantage of you in some way or another. Some are worse than others. Moose just needs to be taught that you are serious, and that you are his leader. Once that happens, his old training will kick back in and you will get your "good"
horse back.
I suppose I was typing same time as you :)
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post #15 of 19 Old 05-29-2012, 02:00 PM
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I am always disheartened to read posts like yours where people buy their first horse and it's way too much for them. I realize that YOU created most of these problems with the horse, as you so bravely admitted. But I also get the feeling that your choosing an OTTB as your first horse, and your being expected to just Cowboy up and go camping with your horse, when you don't have the basics down is a set up for failure. A more mellow horse and some shorter trail rides, and some practice with trailer loading might have made the whole experience one of pleaseruable learning, instead of a fearful disaster.

IN any case, you have Moose now. And you realize that you must change your way of viewing him and dealing with him and never go back. So, I wish you the very best in working with the farrier ,if he is the one who becomes the trainer. It is you who will make the most changes, so be ready to grow!
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post #16 of 19 Old 05-29-2012, 04:17 PM
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I really feel for you, I was almost in the same situation. My wonderful horse I bought started to turn into a monster, but I recruited a trainer right away who gave him an attitude adjustment and taught me how to be a leader. I really had to work on it, carried a crop with me constantly for a few weeks, worked on leading and space and it carried over to the saddle. It took about 4 weeks of constant and consistent leadership on my part and now he WANTS to be with me and trusts me and I him.

Don't give up on him. You've got it in you and you can make this work. Good luck to both of you.
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post #17 of 19 Old 05-29-2012, 06:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
I am always disheartened to read posts like yours where people buy their first horse and it's way too much for them. I realize that YOU created most of these problems with the horse, as you so bravely admitted. But I also get the feeling that your choosing an OTTB as your first horse, and your being expected to just Cowboy up and go camping with your horse, when you don't have the basics down is a set up for failure. A more mellow horse and some shorter trail rides, and some practice with trailer loading might have made the whole experience one of pleaseruable learning, instead of a fearful disaster.

IN any case, you have Moose now. And you realize that you must change your way of viewing him and dealing with him and never go back. So, I wish you the very best in working with the farrier ,if he is the one who becomes the trainer. It is you who will make the most changes, so be ready to grow!
I agree.

You expected a lot from an OTTB who hasn't ridden on trails. Especially when you haven't ridden on trails a lot. I think you need to go back to ground work and basics. I also agree with the comments that you might need to find someone to work with you two together.

My father-in-law and I both have OTTB geldings that are solid trail horses. But they did not start out that way. We went on a lot of stressful trail rides to get to this point. It was 4 years of riding them in the hills around home before we ever took them overnight. I have been riding Comic for 6 years and this spring is the first time I would say he is solid. He's finally arrived where I like a trail horse to be. OTTB horses are nervous by nature and if he's only been on a track or in an arena then a tree or rock can look pretty scary. He needs to trust that you won't get him into trouble so when he sees those things he knows that it must be okay since you are okay with it. At this point he doesn't respect you AND he doesn't trust you. You need to work on both. I'm guessing he's a pretty big guy (Moose sounds big) so that's a lot of horse to get back on after falling off.

Good luck with Moose. It'll take a lot of time and work but you two can be great together.

Riding: The art of keeping a horse between you and the ground. ~Author Unknown
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post #18 of 19 Old 05-29-2012, 11:41 PM
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Selling Him & getting another horse wont Solve anything Because If you get a well broke horse & you act the same way with it Its going to Realize your easy to push around & it will do the same.
Im having some of the same Confidence issues as you . When I try to get my horse to listen & he does something he should I freak out start shaking & get upset Which is my problem. Your Horse Does Not respect you Just like mine does Not respect me at the moment. You need to Show him Who is boss.
Seems to me he freaks out when being tied because he senses your fear & he knows its a quick way to get out of working. Get one of those Tie up things that give slack when the horse pulls back to keep him from freaking out. &
Don't be scared to Show him who is boss. He's Freaking out Because he knows your scared.


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post #19 of 19 Old 05-30-2012, 09:33 AM
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I agree with all the answers above. Some fantastic replies here. I am however commenting from the other end of the scale experience wise, I've been turning to this forum alot recently with confidence issues my self which have rissen when taking a fall trying to bring on a very green broke ( but admittedly easy to do) pony.
After I took my fall I lost HUGE amount of confidence and went from teaching the canter in circles the night before to shaking when trying to walk around the arena. The point im trying to make is this pony never played up once I was there when he got backed etc, as soon as I fell and lost my confidence I started imagining the same happening again and I started creating problems. This pony started stopping and not moving forward , whilst leading, entering stables and whilst riding. I was too frightened to smack him because I was scared of his reaction. Basicaly I just did what I felt confident in doing until my friend who broke him came to help, which was loads of ground stuff.
He even tried to kick me in the stable at on point.
Being scared doesnt help anyone infact it will lead to dangerous situations. But I know how hard it is to get rid of the fear. My friend came and straightened all of these "issues" I had created in my HEAD in an hour. Most of them didnt even exist.
Last night her and her mum came and gave me confidence while I rid, I was shaking when I got on and I started to work in the arena. Her mum started giving ME a lesson, back to basics telling me to move my hads lengthen my legs, turn this way, that way, sitting trot etc etc. The next I knew I was flying around the arena without a care in the world. It took my mind off the pony and onto my self.
After going through a similar situation confidence wise id say do what work you feel confident with yourself starting from very basics on the respect side as mentioned in previous posts.
Let you farrier and or BF do the more difficult stuff that upsets you like tying so that it can be sorted NOW. And then when you build your respect and confidence levels try getting a lesson or two on him riding even if its off your BF. Not because you need lessons just because it will amaze you that when your mind is busy thinking hard about listening to somebody and now worrying about mooses next move how the two of you will do wonders and so the confidence grows in every session!
Iam a work in progress still but instead of feeling like I can't do this pony, after just one session with someone helping im looking forward to taking on new things and realising REALLY how much of this stuff is in my head. If I think he's going to spook, he's going to spook. When I thought he was going to keep stopping he's obviously going to keep stopping and as my reinforcment lessened with my confidence so did his respect. Now I feel like im gaining it back and gaining back control. I am no longer scared to smack him on his butt when he tries to stop or slowdown with our me asking because I know its what he needs. You will find your horse will LOVE you more and more the stronger a leader you become. He wants a leader. A leader he can trust and therefore respect.
I hope you can get your nerves together, for both your sakes. Good luck and enjoy!!

Last edited by Sammyjoe; 05-30-2012 at 09:41 AM.
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