Dixie lunged
 
 

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Dixie lunged

This is a discussion on Dixie lunged within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        07-14-2009, 10:51 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    Thumbs up Dixie lunged

    I know it seems trivial, but for us, it is big strides in getting Dixie to understand that she isn't head mare.

    When we bought her, the previous owner said Dixie was virtually "unlungeable".

    Husband was able to lunge her at a trot for about 10 minutes (and for a total of about 18 including the walk). The only reason she stopped is because someone walked up to talk to me, and Husband's attention was momentarily diverted She did well when stopping too, she didn't turn in toward him, and she waited while he walked to her to give her lots of pats and good girls.
         
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        07-15-2009, 12:54 AM
      #2
    Trained
    How come he lunged her so long, esp for the first time? How come you thought it was good that she didn't face him?
         
        07-15-2009, 09:42 AM
      #3
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    How come he lunged her so long, esp for the first time? How come you thought it was good that she didn't face him?
    18 minutes (10 at the trot) isn't so long, and it wasn't the first time we've lunged her. We have gotten her to trot for about 5 minutes before. Anything between 15-45 minutes is what I was taught for lungeing. Less than 10-15 and you haven't really done anything.

    It's good that she didn't face him because facing him would be her showing her dominance. She needs to wait for his cues and signals before moving.

    Again, that's what I was taught to do by our trainer/instructor.


    Unless I'm mistaken and one of the more knowledgeable trainers wants to correct my misinformation :)
         
        07-15-2009, 10:31 AM
      #4
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by goldilockz    
    18 minutes (10 at the trot) isn't so long, and it wasn't the first time we've lunged her. We have gotten her to trot for about 5 minutes before. Anything between 15-45 minutes is what I was taught for lungeing. Less than 10-15 and you haven't really done anything.
    Longeing time is equivalent to approx. 3x's as much riding time. So 10mins of longeing is like 30mins of riding...provided of course you know how to longe correctly.

    Typically, you don't longe more than 20mins and that's with lots of changes of direction, straightenings, transitions etc... If you're spending most of the time on the longeline walking for various reasons, then you can be more liberal with the time.

    Quote:
    It's good that she didn't face him because facing him would be her showing her dominance. She needs to wait for his cues and signals before moving.
    Right oh! The horse should not turn and come to the person longeing. The horse should halt and stay on the circle and wait for the person to come to them. The only time the horse maybe come towards the person is when longeing in a cavesson and you are adept at making changes of directly while in motion...in which case there is a time when the person will ask the horse to come to them before making the change. HOWEVER, I've only seen a couple of people who could do this.
         
        07-16-2009, 01:32 AM
      #5
    Trained
    [quote=goldilockz;351119]18 minutes (10 at the trot) isn't so long, and it wasn't the first time we've lunged her. We have gotten her to trot for about 5 minutes before. Anything between 15-45 minutes is what I was taught for lungeing. Less than 10-15 and you haven't really done anything.[quote]

    That depends on what you're wanting to achieve with lunging. If you're wanting to exercise the horse, then I agree. But if you're just training the horse who is not yet 'good at it', then 10-15 minutes is likely too long.

    Quote:
    It's good that she didn't face him because facing him would be her showing her dominance. She needs to wait for his cues and signals before moving.
    ...Or it could be that she's looking at your husband to see what comes next, or because she likes him & wants to come to him. Or she is confused & needs reassuring. It could be that standing out there not facing him is because she feels too 'dominant' to stoop to paying him any more attention, that she's afraid to face him, that she's 'giving him the finger' or is on guard, by keeping her rump as close to him as her head... I don't know, without being there, but I'm just trying to point out, don't assume that facing you is 'dominance'... or for that matter, if it is, that that's a problem. After all, in other situations(such as calling her in the paddock for eg) do you see it as an undesirable behaviour for her to face you?

    I do agree that it is desirable for her to learn to stay out on the circle too, so that if you wish for her to do that, she will(lunging to me is about teaching & reinforcing all sorts of things & cues at a distance). But if you're just starting out, concentrate on the basics & get into the specifics once she's getting solid. Not being afraid to turn & face me, not being put off coming in to me for comfort are 2 important basics IMO.

    Quote:
    Again, that's what I was taught to do by our trainer/instructor.
    Yep, I got that idea. Just because they said so doesn't make it right tho. ...Or necessarily wrong for that matter. I find that if you ask 5 experienced horse people a question, you tend to get at least 8 different opinions! I think it's important to learn the whys & wherefores for yourself, then you can make an informed decision on who's advice you might follow. I hope my reply has given you some more food for thought, to that end.
         
        07-16-2009, 08:59 AM
      #6
    Yearling
    In Dixie's case after the "whoa" on the lunge line, she is relaxed, watching and paying attention to him, but waiting. She doesn't start, move, prance or anything when he starts to approach her, and seems to simply be waiting for his next cue or command. She will also come to him if he gives a little tug and asks her toward him.

    I think it's going right, in her case.

    Arizona will probably be different
         
        07-16-2009, 09:56 AM
      #7
    Yearling
    I failed to mention, also, that Dixie is 11, fully trained, and pretty much bombproof. We bought her because she was "too slow and boring" for the previous owner's 9 and 11 year old girls She's been there, done that, and is perfect for challenging us to learn how to do everything the right way.
         
        07-16-2009, 10:28 AM
      #8
    Weanling
    I'm glad your making progress with her! Don't you just love how previous owners tell you so many things and then when you actually do them it's like they were talking about a completely different horse? That happens to so many people I know.
         
        07-16-2009, 10:30 AM
      #9
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SlickDirtyDancin    
    I'm glad your making progress with her! Don't you just love how previous owners tell you so many things and then when you actually do them it's like they were talking about a completely different horse? That happens to so many people I know.
    Yes! It's so funny.
         

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