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Do you tie horses Solid or to something breakable

This is a discussion on Do you tie horses Solid or to something breakable within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

    View Poll Results: Should a be tied solidly or otherwise?
    A Horse should be tied to solid objects, unbreakable 34 59.65%
    A Horse should be tied firmly, but breakable with pressure 24 42.11%
    A horse should be stand on a visual signal from the rope, but not actually tied to anything 14 24.56%
    Horses don't need to know how to stand still 0 0%
    Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 57. You may not vote on this poll

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        08-24-2013, 12:04 PM
      #11
    Foal
    I have a problem with this because my girl accidently trained herself that if she hears the "snap" of the lead rope she thinks she's tied. So I never really have to tie her "solidly" because she doesnt move a muscle besides the occasional moving legs around to gain balance and to move out of my way.
         
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        08-24-2013, 02:00 PM
      #12
    Super Moderator
    I really do think there are so many 'it depends' in these things
    If a horse is properly trained from the start to give to pressure and have a clear grasp of what 'stand' means they generally won't try to run back and get free for no good reason.
    I think the main reason the UK mostly don't tie without a breaking point is that its the British Horse Society preferred method and one that is used by most professionals that people listen too. There was even a BHS statement in one of the leading magazines over there warning people that nylon baling twine shouldn't be used as it doesn't break easily enough
    I think maybe our general set up of yards impacts it - under insurance laws commercially run yards should all have a gate that's closed at all times, most show grounds also have closed gate systems as do private owners so the risks of a loose horse getting onto a road are probably less.
    My horses will stand without being tied or if I just put the rope through the ring or over a fence - they think they're tied up. They are also pretty good at not over reacting to loud noises - usually the trigger for a panic because I think that having them trained to not bolt off from the scary thing is essential for safety
    I've worked with a lot of horses, been around lots of show grounds and auction sites and used to get hijacked by two local mixed vet practices in the UK where they mostly didn't have a vet nurse that was used to horses. I don't say this with the intention of frightening anyone - but I have seen some awful injuries caused by horses being tied to something it couldn't break free where the owners couldn't get to the fastening point quickly enough or get to it without risking themselves because they were in a tight space with a horse thrashing on the floor and also on horses being tied to something where their was no release and they pulled doors of hinges, bricks out of walls, rails off gates
    These issues are almost always down to holes in initial training, people not knowing enough about the horse before they tie it or tying in risky situations.
    I use quick release clips if I need to tie securely - they are a lot safer than a quick release knot which I can vouch will be too tight to unfasten if enough force is put behind it - if you use the knot method you should always have a good sharp knife handy
         
        08-24-2013, 02:42 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    One of my goals is to be able to park my horse and worry no more about it than I would in parking my car. To be able to stand still and be quiet is one of if not -the- most important quality a horse needs to learn in order to become trustworthy! That includes standing tied, standing when I go to mount and dismount, standing to have their feet worked on, standing still in the horse trailer and last but not least, standing still when I'm on their back until I ask them to move! These things are all connected. Whether the lead rope or rein is connected to your hand or another object, the horse needs to learn what that means, that it has a limit, and that he needs to know -how- to honor that limit.
         
        08-24-2013, 02:52 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaydee    
    ...but I have seen some awful injuries caused by horses being tied to something it couldn't break free where the owners couldn't get to the fastening point quickly enough or get to it without risking themselves because they were in a tight space with a horse thrashing on the floor and also on horses being tied to something where their was no release and they pulled doors of hinges, bricks out of walls, rails off gates

    Exactly. Horses have independent minds and occasionally even the best trained animal may panic and I would rather have a broken piece of string than a broke neck or leg. All my horses tie quietly, but I don't believe in treating them like parked cars and would rather be cautious than lose a friend.
         
        08-24-2013, 02:57 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaydee    
    I've worked with a lot of horses, been around lots of show grounds and auction sites and used to get hijacked by two local mixed vet practices in the UK where they mostly didn't have a vet nurse that was used to horses. I don't say this with the intention of frightening anyone - but I have seen some awful injuries caused by horses being tied to something it couldn't break free where the owners couldn't get to the fastening point quickly enough or get to it without risking themselves because they were in a tight space with a horse thrashing on the floor and also on horses being tied to something where their was no release and they pulled doors of hinges, bricks out of walls, rails off gates
    These issues are almost always down to holes in initial training, people not knowing enough about the horse before they tie it or tying in risky situations.
    That same story seems to be universal doesn't it? The horse dragging the stall door by its chin and other classic wrecks resulting from "things we didn't think they could or would do!".
    PunksTank likes this.
         
        08-24-2013, 03:04 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    We go on overnight trips to trail ride and knowing how to hard tie is a must for my horses. I sure don't want to wake up in the morning and not see my horse standing at the hitching rail. Of course you still have to worry about escape artists.

    Back in my old geldings riding days he was notorious for not only being able to untie himself if at a hitching rail, he could also escape from being tied to a high-line. Without access to a tree or anything else solid if he couldn't get his lead rope to unsnap itself he could get his halter off. Don't ask me how because he never did it when I was watching. It got to the point that he had to have 2 halters and 2 lead ropes on to keep him in place. He never took off and headed for home, thankfully, but he'd come and find me if I was off visiting at another campsite, or I found him hiding between 2 draft mules sharing their hay once, or the time he scared the wits out of a couple in the neighboring camp when he decided to load himself in their trailer in the middle of the night (they left the back door open and it was a trailer with lq LOL), or the time I was about a mile out of camp on my other horse and here he came running up the trail to catch up with us.

    He was a character, but I wouldn't part with him for the world. At 28, he doesn't go to trail rides anymore, but he takes his new job of keeping the "youngsters" (ranging from 5 -17 years old) in line very seriously. LOL

    I've never had a problem teaching them to hard tie. I've always waited until they were halter broke, which wasn't started until between 6 months to a year old, and once they were used to always giving to the pressure of the halter then they didn't fight being tied. First few tying lessons I use a long lead I can wrap around a post and keep a hold on the end of it so that I can control the pressure while I go about grooming them or whatever. Next few, they'll get tied hard but I'm still right there with them. The next few I'll tie them and go do other things but I'm still in at least hearing distance. Once they pass all those tests, they're good to go.
    Northern and CowboyBob like this.
         
        08-24-2013, 03:24 PM
      #17
    Foal
    It depends on the horse for me. My mom's horse isn't properly trained to stand, and I don't want to deal with a 19year old spoiled horse, so I just solid tie him with a quick release. He'll attempt to walk away, but responds to the pressure.

    My horse, on the other hand, sees the quick release as a toy. I left him tied to use the restroom once, and came back to him with the lead rope about 4 feet down his throat. Now he is never tied in a way he can get to the rope. I just put the rope over his back, and tell him to stand. If I need to leave for an amount of time, I either hobble or tie him to a high tree some can't reach his rope.

    You could say both of my horses are improperly trained :/
         
        08-25-2013, 12:17 AM
      #18
    Green Broke
    At their barns the horses I work with are tied to something solid, with quick release knots.

    At the field they are tied to strings rated at only 13# test strength. Just in case... of what I don't know, but with other people and horses in the mix it seems like the unexpected and unimagined can happen.
         
        08-25-2013, 12:23 AM
      #19
    Banned
    I don't believe that tying solidly is safe, nor ground tying. Horses can and will spook at some unexpected event, and I think then both situations are unsafe. By tying with quick release or bailing twine to something secure, I believe you have time to get to your horse.

    If I need to leave my horse and walk somewhere else that's like a different barn, or the tack room, I'd leave someone else with my horse if tied, or I'd put him back in the stall.

    If you ground or secure tie, what would happen if a wasp stings the horse? I'd think you would have a loose or injured horse.
    Clava likes this.
         
        08-25-2013, 12:25 AM
      #20
    Foal
    I watched a horse tied to a fence panic and pull back, bringing half the fence with him and banging up his knees. If he'd been tied to something breakable like baling twine, he would have saved both himself and the fence. I do like to tie to something that will break, in saying that though, I've known several horses that have learned to pull back and free themselves just for the sake of it. In those cases, I think they do need to learn to stand tied to a solid object, since they've developed a bad habit. Something elastic that they can pull against without hurting themselves, but will always encourage them back to the fence. It seems gentler than tying them to something solid and letting them learn the hard way that they can't break free.

    However, I acknowledge those who prefer their solid-object tying, and see the merits of that too. It's just not what I'd do.
         

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