Do It Yourself or Get Some HELP!!!!????
 
 

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Do It Yourself or Get Some HELP!!!!????

This is a discussion on Do It Yourself or Get Some HELP!!!!???? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

    View Poll Results: To train or not to train.....?
    Train on your own with books and videos. 0 0%
    Train yourself with the help of a real trainer. 6 50.00%
    Send off to trainer and have no part. 8 66.67%
    Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 12. You may not vote on this poll

     
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        03-04-2010, 06:32 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Do It Yourself or Get Some HELP!!!!????

    My 2 yr old was given to me as a yearling and is my first horse that is officialy my own. I know a lot about care and just a little about ridding, nearly nothing about training. So though Im training him myself, I have a trainer helping. But I constantly worry that Im just not quailified to do this,even with assistance. I just don't like the idea of someone else training him....What would you all do?
         
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        03-04-2010, 06:58 PM
      #2
    Trained
    If I were you I would get a gentle old horse and learn to ride before I accepted the responsibility of a young horse. I think your horse would be much better off if you sent him to a trainer and let the trainer ride him for at least two months while you take riding lessons at least twice a week. If you can't do that you will not have too much success training him. A young horse needs a balanced capable rider for the initial training. If you are off balance and inexperienced then the horse will be much more likely to develop bad habits.
         
        03-04-2010, 07:14 PM
      #3
    Started
    I too voted to send the youngster off to the trainer's. To bring a baby up to be a solid and reliable good citizen takes a lot of experience on top of pretty excellent riding ability. Those first rides can be key in setting the baby up for his using life, and if something goes wrong then you're well set for issues later. So, I would find a good, reputable trainer to do the starting, and look into taking some riding lessons on a horse that matches you and your skill level in the meantime. If your trainer will allow you to "visit" and see what he/she's doing, and even give a "lesson" to get you and your guy settled, so much the better. If in doubt, get help before things go south.

    Good luck!
         
        03-05-2010, 07:50 AM
      #4
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Scoutrider    
    I too voted to send the youngster off to the trainer's. To bring a baby up to be a solid and reliable good citizen takes a lot of experience on top of pretty excellent riding ability. Those first rides can be key in setting the baby up for his using life, and if something goes wrong then you're well set for issues later. So, I would find a good, reputable trainer to do the starting, and look into taking some riding lessons on a horse that matches you and your skill level in the meantime. If your trainer will allow you to "visit" and see what he/she's doing, and even give a "lesson" to get you and your guy settled, so much the better. If in doubt, get help before things go south.

    Good luck!
    If trainer does NOT allow that stay away from such trainer. As far as possible.

    I agree with other people, if you have enough money and know a good trainer it's better to send him there and take lessons under the trainer (although some trainers don't like anyone to ride horse in training for first couple weeks). If you don't have enough money (good trainers are NOT cheap) - go with the lessons from good trainer. Learning from books/videos is great (AND beneficial) but unfortunately not enough when you deal with the horse in real life.
         
        03-05-2010, 01:28 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    If you have to ASK if you should be training this horse, you probably shouldn't be. From the sounds of it I would say you and the horse would benefit much more from sending him to a trainer (not I don't agree with the 'having no part' thing, I would never want to not have ANY part in my horses training) than you would from training him yourself.

    I got my first horse, a very HOT mare. I didn't take lessons or 'officially' have a trainer, but my mom has ridden for a long time and was always supervising. Let me just say my horse went through ALOT while I was trying to learn what exactly I should be doing with her, and she proved to be the most tolerant horse I have ever seen. Looking back on it, I feel AWFUL for what I put my mare through (hauling on her mouth, getting pissy with her when I wasn't clear with her, etc). It's just something you can't undo, and if you don't have a tolerant horse like this mare, it could be a disaster. You could also cause a huge mess for a trainer to undo when you finally decide you can't train this horse yourself.
         
        03-05-2010, 01:31 PM
      #6
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
    If trainer does NOT allow that stay away from such trainer. As far as possible.
    Completely agree with this, if a trainer doesn't allow you to see your horse - there is a reason, never heard of it being a good reason either.
         
        03-08-2010, 12:27 PM
      #7
    Foal
    Just to be a little more informative, I have been ridding and working around horses for many years, I've just never owned one. I am taking ridding lessons because though I can "ride" anything you put me on,it isnt going to be pretty lol. Im not good with the finer points, like keeping my hands really still and not leaning forward.I want very much to be as much a part of Salems training as I can, I think that really benefits the bond and understanding. As for getting rid of Salem and getting an older horse, I wasnt even looking to own a horse to begin with,he was given to me and I accepted him because I've never seen such a sweet quiet young horse.His personality won me over completely and I don't think I would find another horse that would get me like that.I just kinda wondered what other people thought about "self-training" and hoped someone would have some suggestions for how to make this as good as possible for us both.
         
        03-08-2010, 12:32 PM
      #8
    Banned
    I think it takes a much bigger person to admit they need help than it takes to be one that thinks they can do everything.

    I vote send to a professional trainer. Find your self a trainer that knows you want to learn and the trainer can train the horse while he teaches you what he is doing.

    You most certainly do not have to all of your horses training to have a bond with them. Life is not that much of a fairytale.

    Quote:
    I know a lot about care and just a little about ridding, nearly nothing about training.
    You posted that line. Read it and think about your horse. Do what is best for your horse!
         
        03-08-2010, 12:49 PM
      #9
    Foal
    I don't want to sound like Im arguing,I asked for everyones advice. But I don't need to read or think about what I said.I would never even consider sending him away to a trainer where I can't see every little thing that happens,I don't trust anyone that much. I say "bond" and I don't just mean a loving sunggly thing, Im referring also to the respect a horse has for the person who taught him respect right from the beginning. I see too many people at the barn where I work and board who send a horse to a trainer,trainer tells them what to do and after two weeks of things being ok, they can't figure out why the horse is misbehaving again. I don't do anything new without my trainer,she shows us and then when I can do it to her satisfaction,we practise on our own.
         
        03-08-2010, 06:32 PM
      #10
    Yearling
    I really wish people would give up on this romantic notion that the only way you can have the complete love and respect of a horse is to train it yourself from the beginning, or that your bond with your horse will be enhanced if you "learn together." Equine brains don't work like that. They just don't. A horse, given the opportunity, is capable of establishing a strong bond with his herdmates, new herdmates even.

    What I am saying is that, "I want "the respect a horse has for the person who taught him right from the beginning" isn't a good reason to train your own horse.

    As far as the people at your barn who's horses are misbehaving and being sent off to the trainer's, chances are that the horses are misbehaving because of something their owners are doing. So if the owner doesn't change their behaviour and goes back to the same thing which caused the horse to act out in the first place, then of course the horse will resume misbehaving. You don't need to back your own horse to avoid this. You just need to learn good horsemanship skills and know something about equine behaviour.
         

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