Doesn't want to be caught?
 
 

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Doesn't want to be caught?

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  • SHE DOESNOT WANT TO CAUGHT

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    01-09-2013, 10:43 AM
  #1
Foal
Doesn't want to be caught?

My mare does not want to be caught when she see's that I have a bridle in my hand. What to do?
     
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    01-09-2013, 10:50 AM
  #2
Foal
Does she let you catch her with a halter?

She knows a bridle means work so she can easily avoid that by not letting you catch her. I'd say go out and catch her often, with the bridle(or halter if she doesn't like it either) and sometimes ride her but other days just brush her, or do something something she enjoys. I say this so that she won't always associate the bridle with being worked and won't mind being caught so much because she never knows what you're going to do.

Hope I helped! :)
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    01-09-2013, 10:58 AM
  #3
Weanling
The best way to do this is. Make her want to be with you. Chase her off, make her move. The sec she stops to look at you, turn your back on her. Wait a few secs. Turn back around. Walk to her, if she moves off. Case her again. Keep doing this till she allows you to walk up to her. This could take some time to get your point across.
     
    01-09-2013, 11:21 AM
  #4
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freemare    
The best way to do this is. Make her want to be with you. Chase her off, make her move. The sec she stops to look at you, turn your back on her. Wait a few secs. Turn back around. Walk to her, if she moves off. Case her again. Keep doing this till she allows you to walk up to her. This could take some time to get your point across.
So many people are against this system for some reason, but it is by and large the most successful way to train a horse to be caught than any other I have seen.

The way I see it, if they want to run away from me, then I am going to make them run. Now it's MY idea. I'M the boss, I make the decisions, not the horse. No, this doesn't mean go out and immediately start sending your horse galloping around the pasture for an hour. Just walk up and try to catch her. If she trots away, then push her and keep her trotting when she tries to stop. I've found it works better when you let them stop and try to catch them every few minutes as opposed to trying a "join-up," does that make sense? So give a push and then try again. It may be that your work for the day is learning to be caught, but it's an invaluable lesson to learn. Sometimes it takes just a few minutes, sometimes it takes an hour. Some horses will get it the first day, some will try to avoid you again the next. Just stay consistent. They'll learn.

And I don't think it makes a difference in the catching process if you take twenty minutes to catch them and then still ride them that day. Keeping in mind the physical condition of the horse and making sure it doesn't get over-exerted is all you really need.
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    01-09-2013, 02:05 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by riccil0ve    
So many people are against this system for some reason, but it is by and large the most successful way to train a horse to be caught than any other I have seen.

The way I see it, if they want to run away from me, then I am going to make them run. Now it's MY idea. I'M the boss, I make the decisions, not the horse. No, this doesn't mean go out and immediately start sending your horse galloping around the pasture for an hour. Just walk up and try to catch her. If she trots away, then push her and keep her trotting when she tries to stop. I've found it works better when you let them stop and try to catch them every few minutes as opposed to trying a "join-up," does that make sense? So give a push and then try again. It may be that your work for the day is learning to be caught, but it's an invaluable lesson to learn. Sometimes it takes just a few minutes, sometimes it takes an hour. Some horses will get it the first day, some will try to avoid you again the next. Just stay consistent. They'll learn.

And I don't think it makes a difference in the catching process if you take twenty minutes to catch them and then still ride them that day. Keeping in mind the physical condition of the horse and making sure it doesn't get over-exerted is all you really need.
This does work really well and I have used it but I have also seen people try to use it in too big a pasture. The size of the area makes a big difference. In a 5 acre pasture, they just run to the other end and by the time you get there they have a good graze and a rest. It will become a game. I would want to do it in an area of an acre or less. I had a horse that I HAD to get caught and of course I had him caught, got cocky and tossed the rope over his neck while I was petting him. Getting ready to get the halter on and he spooked...1 hour later of chasing him in the above method around a 3 acre pasture we were both tired enough to want it to be over. Pick your battles, catch them with grain in a BIG area, move them to a smaller area (maybe start in a RP and move up to an arena etc) and work on catching them. The biggest secret for long term catching them is to make it an enjoyable experience once they are caught. Each horse has their triggers that make them love something, it is up to you to find what it is and exploit it every time
You catch them. Once you find it, they have a tendency to catch you!

Cheers!
Les
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    01-09-2013, 08:49 PM
  #6
Green Broke
In a larger pasture I suggest the Club Car method, or ATV if you have one.

Not a full out chase, but just a "ho-hum had a nice lunch and think I will make the horses walk/trot for a while" with no major urgency.

Although did have an amusing time watching one of my ex-spousal units run my QH around an 18 acre pasture for about an hour. He always reminded me of a turtle in a cowboy hat, and had thick lenses in glasses....so it was pretty funny.
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    01-10-2013, 10:20 AM
  #7
Weanling
I have a very different mare. As my vet says she is way smarter than she needs to be.
A couple of years ago when we would be going somewhere this little smarty started running from me. Not for long and I never chased her. I timed it once at eight minutes, and then she would come. It was annoying. Somehow she always knew we were going otherwise she'd come running when I called her.

A friend suggested that as this mare does enjoy pulling my strings that I pretend that I LOVED it when she would circle around me bucking and flying.

I started YAYING and WHATTA GIRL and YOU GO GIRL. Silly girl stopped dead. Looked at me and came to me.

Next time she started off and I started my show of appreciation again. She stopped and came to me and never again has she tried to evade me.

Not saying this would work with any other horse but it was the easyest fix I've ever had.
     
    01-10-2013, 11:56 AM
  #8
Started
Why would she want to be caught? Catching means work. If she can escape the halter she can escape the work.

I do not catch my horses every time I go out, and it helps. Some days I go just to walk, sometimes to pet and groom and visit, some days I put a halter on them and bring them in, the rare occasion I will take treats(I don't recommend this in a herd situation without carrying a long stick or whip to create necessary distance when needed).
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    01-10-2013, 08:19 PM
  #9
Yearling
Acorn, that is hilarious!
One thing that a trainer told me once was to put the mare in a pen by herself and me be the one to feed and water her. For water I had to bring it every couple of hours and she had to drink the water out of the bucket that I was holding. If she didn't drink it, she had to wait until next time. After a week (I would have gone longer but something came up) she still didn't like me (we couldn't agree on anything it seemed), but I could walk out into her ten acre pasture (with 11 other horses) and catch her. So it did work. I also have used and really like the catch and groom, or catch and give a couple treats. Even just go out and catch her, pet her neck a couple times and then let her go.
I also find when I release my horse after a ride/work out, that he/she needs to wait to leave until I verbally release them. I will take the halter/bridle off, and have the horse stand with me until I tell them "off with you", or I walk away and leave. It seems to have helped with my gelding that I have now, he tends to be herd bound.
You'll have to tell us what you used and how it worked. Every horse is different, and in a different situation. For example, right now my horse runs in a 80-100 acre pasture, chasing him won't work. Believe me, I've tried chasing horses out there. LOL!
     
    01-11-2013, 09:19 AM
  #10
Green Broke
Our horses are dry lotted, not sure if yours are, but when they don't want to be caught they don't eat. One night of no dinner and they are desperate to come inside. We feed them inside for a week AND bring them in and do good things with them. Brush them, throw carrots in the feed in the stall, or hand graze them. We ride them also, but the name of the game is trying to make what comes after being pleasant.
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