Double Bridle Question!
 
 

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Double Bridle Question!

This is a discussion on Double Bridle Question! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to fit a weymouth bridle
  • Fitting the bits of a double bridle

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    06-26-2012, 09:33 AM
  #1
Foal
Double Bridle Question!

I need some help. I am looking to get my arab mare into a double bridle. I ride her saddleseat and I do know how to properly ride in a double bride I've just never had to buy the proper bit. She used a double bridle in the past, however I am not able to get that information from the previous owners. How do you go about fitting the weymouth bit and how do you choose the proper size port? Thank you for any help!
     
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    06-26-2012, 10:43 AM
  #2
Super Moderator
A weymouth does not have to have a port you can get them with a straight mouthpiece. If you are not sure then I would go for the above or a shallow port.

As for fitting. The bridoon fits onto the running head and should be fitted as with a normal snaffle. The Weymouth fits onto the normal cheekpieces and should be settled just under the bridoon height wise but should be resting over the top of the Weymouth
How to Fit A Double Bridle | Horse Training Tips and Techniques

Incidentally, the running head should do up on the right side of the bridle - this is to balance out the buckle from the noseband.
palominolover likes this.
     
    06-26-2012, 03:24 PM
  #3
Foal
double bridal

Hi, may I offer you something different than a double bridal. Try going to a single bridal, and double reins, and my techique, and you don't need any special bit, a D ring snaffel will work well in most cases. I can say this because I used the double bridal for over 30 years, until I developed this method. Hope it helps you, and the beauty of it all it only takes one lesson. I know it doesn't seem real, but thousands have used this method around the world. I never had one that ever failed. Any one can use it, Good luck your pal, Al p.s. You will collect and pick up your leads faster in this lesson, and it cost nothing.
     
    06-26-2012, 03:33 PM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Ragusin    
Hi, may I offer you something different than a double bridal. Try going to a single bridal, and double reins, and my techique, and you don't need any special bit, a D ring snaffel will work well in most cases. I can say this because I used the double bridal for over 30 years, until I developed this method. Hope it helps you, and the beauty of it all it only takes one lesson. I know it doesn't seem real, but thousands have used this method around the world. I never had one that ever failed. Any one can use it, Good luck your pal, Al p.s. You will collect and pick up your leads faster in this lesson, and it cost nothing.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but once you reach a certain level of saddleseat you have to have a double bridle, like in dressage.
KissTheRing likes this.
     
    06-26-2012, 05:24 PM
  #5
Foal
Answer to Asksly. All the yeas I competed In dressage. This was the reins I used, no one ever questioned them. I think the double bridal was used to have two bits to do collection and the guiding and turning with the other one, you might ask someone exactly why, because I' not sure why
     
    06-26-2012, 08:51 PM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Ragusin    
answer to Asksly. All the yeas I competed In dressage. This was the reins I used, no one ever questioned them. I think the double bridal was used to have two bits to do collection and the guiding and turning with the other one, you might ask someone exactly why, because I' not sure why
But at certain levels, a double bridle is REQUIRED. You can't compete in Grand Prix in anything but a double. Having two reins does not exempt anyone from this rule.

Not to sound snotty, but a bridle is a peice of tack while bridal most definitely isn't.
Palomine likes this.
     
    06-26-2012, 09:01 PM
  #7
Trained
Arksly is absolutely correct. Even a plain snaffle is not permitted at Internationally Endorsed FEI classes - I believe that some countries are permitting snaffles in PSG/I1 now though, though I may be wrong (as Australia is not one of them).
A double MUST be used above medium level. Not some personal invention that is 'kind of sort of' a double bridle. That just doesn't cut it - so Al Ragusin, I must question the validity of your claims of having competed in 'dressage' and not been questioned, if so, what kind of dressage? Maybe local club style dressage, but I am highly dubious that you have competed in this 'invention' officially.
     
    06-26-2012, 09:16 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Just get a smooth snaffle, and try a Tom Bass bit for your curb. Horse will tell you if it is right or not.

For snaffle, don't get huge one, but just a nice one, we've used rubber snaffles in double bridles, but best to have just smaller diameter.

And fit as you would any bit. Don't want it too small, so pinches mouth, and don't want it so wide that you could hang flags off of it.

Just a nice smooth snaffle, O ring type.

Play around and see which gets the best results.
     
    06-26-2012, 10:34 PM
  #9
Foal
Respond to Kayty, I misunderstood exactly what she was asking.I didn't know that she was entering some type of competition. I get between 600 to 1000 visitors to my site weekly and they ask me all kinds of questions, and I have no way of knowing the extent of their experience. I thought she was trying to collect her horse, and I am guilty of trying to help,sorry. As for my time with the local dressage teams was to learn some movements, same as I did in racing,cutting,western pleasure, barrels,reining,poles,charros and bullfighting from horseback(bloodless). I have won382 first place trophys and awards,have the only true dancing horses in the world. Have been featured on six major networks. Most of my wins is in the AQHA which you can verify or google my name to see for yourself, and you are still dubious, sorry.
     
    06-26-2012, 10:48 PM
  #10
Trained
You said, and I quote: "All the years I competed in dressage", this would generally make one assume that you were referring to competing, no?

The only true dancing horses in the world?
Clearly the Spanish Riding School is not up to scratch then ;)
Are these dancing horses the type that have their legs hit to do a shuffling piaffe trying to get away from flicking whips or ropes? Or genuinely, collected, classically trained 'dancing' horses?
     

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