dropping the inside shoulder
   

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dropping the inside shoulder

This is a discussion on dropping the inside shoulder within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to stop horse from dropping inside shoulder
  • Horse on inside shoulder

 
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    05-27-2011, 09:29 PM
  #1
Foal
dropping the inside shoulder

Ok I started having this issue with my boy today, I've been working extremely hard at getting him better balanced and he's been doing great but I just started working on his canter/lope again circling and he's had a few weeks off due to me being sick so when I was out he did ok at his canter but then he started dropping his inside shoulder quite bad.I tried lifting like I have been doing with his trot but it didn't help. Any suggestions? Thanks
     
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    05-27-2011, 09:42 PM
  #2
Foal
Lift you hand or your rein? Or both I guess? I'm not an expert and I ride English, but I have always had a problem with my gelding dropping or leaning out on a shoulder. Don't lift the rein, that just lets the shoulder pop underneath it. I would lift my inside rein to keep my horse from dropping his shoulder and my trainer said to me, "He's 1100 pounds, there is no way you are going to pick him up with that little rein." It was a tough habit to break.

When he leans to the inside or drops that shoulder down, pull the rein down and back to your hip instead and apply your leg. Then take him a little on the outside rein to straighten him out.

Give that a whirl.
     
    05-27-2011, 10:56 PM
  #3
Foal
Pick up your inside rein, don't cross it over his neck. Help him balance with your outside and make sure you are sitting squarely on your seatbones, legs at the girth and using your inside leg.

Im no expert, but this has worked well for me. Though I probably should explain more.
     
    05-27-2011, 10:58 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wancata    
Lift you hand or your rein? Or both I guess? I'm not an expert and I ride English, but I have always had a problem with my gelding dropping or leaning out on a shoulder. Don't lift the rein, that just lets the shoulder pop underneath it. I would lift my inside rein to keep my horse from dropping his shoulder and my trainer said to me, "He's 1100 pounds, there is no way you are going to pick him up with that little rein." It was a tough habit to break.

When he leans to the inside or drops that shoulder down, pull the rein down and back to your hip instead and apply your leg. Then take him a little on the outside rein to straighten him out.

Give that a whirl.
Thanks! Ya wut I'm doing is lifting my inside rein and bringing the outside back to my hip bc I have found if he drops his inside his outside bulges and if he bulges his outside in his corners at the trot my outside rein straightens it back out to where it should be. I will try this thank u
     
    05-27-2011, 11:05 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by eventerjumpergirl    
Pick up your inside rein, don't cross it over his neck. Help him balance with your outside and make sure you are sitting squarely on your seatbones, legs at the girth and using your inside leg.

Im no expert, but this has worked well for me. Though I probably should explain more.
Just saw this and it sounds basically what I'm doing thanks
     
    05-31-2011, 09:46 AM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by dashforcache    
Just saw this and it sounds basically what I'm doing thanks
Like EventerJumperGirl said, don't cross that rein over the neck when you lift it. Which is actually harder than you think and you may do it from time to time with out knowing it. For example, I would lift my inside rein and press with my inside leg to get his shoulder up, but without even knowing it, I was crossing my rein over his neck and bending at my side to push him off my leg. So my spin was like a question mark trying to push and lift!! It was ridiculous! I find not lifting, and bringing the rein back is more effective. And hold the rein there until your horse gives a little to the pressure then release. When he brings his back up to you he won't drop that shoulder as much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dashforcache    
Thanks! Ya wut I'm doing is lifting my inside rein and bringing the outside back to my hip bc I have found if he drops his inside his outside bulges and if he bulges his outside in his corners at the trot my outside rein straightens it back out to where it should be. I will try this thank u
Perfect! When he brings that shoulder up and you've got him where you want him, take him a little on the outside, like a little half halt and he'll straighten up.
     
    05-31-2011, 10:19 AM
  #7
mls
Trained
Circle hard to the outside as you roll your inside leg up his barrel. He will start to associate the roll (ideally with a spur) with the lift correction and he won't need to be circled.
     
    05-31-2011, 10:23 AM
  #8
Banned
The problem with all the replies given out is that it does not address the cause of the shoulder dropping.

Like putting a band aid over a soar cause by Leprosy. It does nothing but hide the problem.

The cause of a shoulder dropping originates from the HAUNCHES and it is there where the correction must be given.

The horse is crooked and the haunches are drifting out. The rider needs to align the haunches so they are behind the horse and not left while the horse falls in right ( or visa versa).

While you can use the reins to pull the horse in place, the rider's outside leg could be put to better use by aligning the drifting haunches into a straighter position.
     
    05-31-2011, 10:37 AM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder    
The problem with all the replies given out is that it does not address the cause of the shoulder dropping.

Like putting a band aid over a soar cause by Leprosy. It does nothing but hide the problem.

The cause of a shoulder dropping originates from the HAUNCHES and it is there where the correction must be given.

The horse is crooked and the haunches are drifting out. The rider needs to align the haunches so they are behind the horse and not left while the horse falls in right ( or visa versa).

While you can use the reins to pull the horse in place, the rider's outside leg could be put to better use by aligning the drifting haunches into a straighter position.
The whole time I was reading this thread, I kept saying "Close your doors"
     
    05-31-2011, 10:54 AM
  #10
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder    
The problem with all the replies given out is that it does not address the cause of the shoulder dropping.

Like putting a band aid over a soar cause by Leprosy. It does nothing but hide the problem.

The cause of a shoulder dropping originates from the HAUNCHES and it is there where the correction must be given.

The horse is crooked and the haunches are drifting out. The rider needs to align the haunches so they are behind the horse and not left while the horse falls in right ( or visa versa).

While you can use the reins to pull the horse in place, the rider's outside leg could be put to better use by aligning the drifting haunches into a straighter position.

Not all. A cutting horse has a tremendous 'sweep' with the front end. They can actually sit with their hind quarters 100% correct, yet 'drop' into the sweep.

By circling the oppostion direction, you are aligning the horse. Use only of the reins can allow the horse to brace on the reins. Putting your leg on the horse will support the rib cage too.
     

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