ear pinning and general disrespect
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

ear pinning and general disrespect

This is a discussion on ear pinning and general disrespect within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Videos on how to stop ear pinning on a yearling
  • Ear pinning in mares

Like Tree3Likes
  • 2 Post By ThursdayNext
  • 1 Post By aggiegirl14

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-03-2012, 03:08 PM
  #1
Foal
ear pinning and general disrespect

I have owned Fancy since she was about a year old. I broke her and took her to shows when she was 3, but then I went off to college and only get the chance to handle her when I am home for breaks. I have been in college for a year and a half, just to give you a time frame.

She has always had a bit of an attitude, but since I have been gone it has gotten worse. I realize it's probably because she doesn't get handled much, but now that I am trying to sell her, I really need to concentrate on getting her manners back. No one wants to drive out here to look at a potential buy who just pins her ears back when you brush her -_-

I just got done doing some ground work with her, but I'm not sure if what I am doing is right. I started out brushing her (she wasn't tied up, I was holding the lead rope) and anytime she would pin her ears at me I would immediately send her off trotting in small circles around me. I didn't really know when I should release, so I just stopped after about a minute and continued brushing until the next time she pinned her ears and I would repeat the whole cycle over again.

After about 3 times of this, I decided to just take her to the round pen so that when I sent her out I could really make her work. So I stood in the middle brushing her, and when she pinned her ears I sent her out on the rail. I waited to let her stop until she showed signs of submission (head lowered, ear on me, licking lips) and then I would turn away from her and let her come into the circle with me. After doing that twice she stopped pinning her ears when I brushed over her back, but instead she would swish her tail and lift up her back leg in a threatening-to-kick way. I made sure to end on a good note, but she never really stopped the tail/leg thing like she did the ear pinning.

She also pins her ears at me when I walk by her eating which I don't like, but I don't know how to "reprimand" her in a situation like that. I could use some help with breaking these bad habits!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-03-2012, 11:31 PM
  #2
Yearling
I ran across a Rick Gore video on YouTube recently about this EXACT issue (ear pinning at dinner time).

Here it is.

     
    01-03-2012, 11:37 PM
  #3
Started
Subbing
     
    01-03-2012, 11:57 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
I will make a horse move and will put pressure on one that is loose, particularly in a round pen.

If I have one on a lead-rope or a line or have one tied up, I do just the opposite. I give the rope a jerk and back the horse up and turn it away from me. [If it is tied for grooming or saddleing, I quickly untie it first.] I make it back and make it yield its shoulders. If I am brushing the left side of the horse, I will back it briskly for 5 or 6 steps and will then make it do a 360 or maybe two of them to the right, especially if it is reluctant or sluggish in the way it does the 360.

If I am on the horse's right side, I will back it up and make it do one or two 360s moving its shoulders to the left. I make sure there are sharp consequences for being cranky or sullen. The ears back or the shaking of the head will get a swift response from me.

A lifted foot or other threat will get a stronger response from me. I will spank the horse's chest to make it back up faster. I will move its shoulders to the right, to the left, back again, to the left again. When a horse gets threatening or sullen ( bows up and refuses to move), I will get much rougher on it.

Just like another horse 'punishes' a horse that is disrespectful, the worse the aggression, the bigger my demands are. If you give a horse a pass on pinning its ears at you, it is just a matter of time before it gets more and more aggressive toward people. I believe in 'zero tolerance' where aggressive behavior is aimed toward any person at any time -- loose, in hand or under saddle. Loose, you are stuck with only being able to make a horse move forward or run away from you. In hand or under saddle, you have the ability to make a horse back up or turn sharply on command, so that is what I prefer to do.
     
    01-04-2012, 12:01 AM
  #5
Foal
The video was helpful, thank you! I actually just sold the horse I was asking about :( Those people came with the trailer and bought her after spending time around her for an hour and a half... It was so fast! I'm happy, I love the people, but I'm also sad because I wasn't expecting it!

I still want to learn more about how to break this habit for future reference, so keep the comments coming!
     
    01-04-2012, 12:03 AM
  #6
Showing
Well at least you found her a good home!
     
    01-04-2012, 12:07 AM
  #7
Foal
I couldn't have asked for nicer people! I was open and honest with them about her attitude, but I hope the daughter is ready for it!
Skyseternalangel likes this.
     
    07-20-2012, 03:18 PM
  #8
Foal
Thank you for the Rick Gore video! I have a mare that not only pins her ears when I approach her, but she doesn't hesitate to wheel around and throw a kick. She has already kicked one person that I know of. She is extremely difficult to catch and I'd love to just chase her around the field, but she has a lot more endurance than I can ever hope to have (I'm 65 and she's an Arabian). This mare has had nothing done with her for the past 7 years but prior to that, she was ground driven and had a saddle and rider on her (on lead line). I have just one question...will I someday be able to NOT carry a whip around with me when dealing with this mare? Thanks to all who posted answers on this thread; you have definitely helped me.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Disrespect to me? apachewhitesox Horse Talk 8 08-05-2011 04:49 AM
Disrespect or inexperience? AllThePrettyHorses Horse Training 24 08-01-2011 04:11 AM
Major disrespect! (long) amymarie57 Horse Training 27 06-07-2011 02:06 PM
Disrespect problem/question gabrielstriumph Horse Training 15 04-23-2011 11:47 AM
managing dangerous disrespect mlkarel2010 Natural Horsemanship 17 06-05-2009 04:40 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0