Encouraging a faster response
   

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Encouraging a faster response

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  • Horse training quicker responce
  • Encourage faster response method

 
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    10-23-2008, 06:08 PM
  #1
Foal
Encouraging a faster response

My horse has always been kind of slow, it's not that she's lazy, she just does things at her own pace. I've finally managed to get her to walk at a respectable pace when leading, with some forward impulsion, but I'm having troubles translating this into under saddle work.

My main problem is when I ask for a walk from a standstill, or a trot from standstill or walk. She stops nice and fast, and backs up not slow, but I'm satisfied with her pace for now. Basically when I ask her forward, I count to three in my head, and it's usually at 3 and a half she gets moving. I want a snappier response, preferably in the 1-2 second range, and then for it to be smooth, not like she's dragging herself through a bog.

I really cannot think of anything to get this better. She knows to move off of my leg, and I get a slightly faster response with spurs, but I really do not want to be using spurs for her to go forward. Transitions don't seem to make much of an impact. I have carried a crop as well, but that has the same effect as the spurs.

Please help me!!! I ride her in a snaffle, and I'm starting her western. She is an otherwise good girl, once we get going she's alright (a little pokey, but I think if I fix this that will be solved as well), it's just this one thing! I will try anything, I'm open to it all, especially if I haven't tried it/a new twist on an old idea!
     
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    10-23-2008, 09:56 PM
  #2
HTS
Foal
Have you tried doing exercises such as doubling back that really get her concentrating on and listening to you?
     
    10-24-2008, 01:11 AM
  #3
Foal
What is doubling back? Like do a roll back or a turn on the haunches?
     
    10-24-2008, 09:28 AM
  #4
Trained
It's the cue that you're giving her. Whether or not you have realized it...You are allowing or have taught her to go...at 3 1/2...LOL... That's the point where you sit more aggressive in the seat or go to use the crop or spurs. That's the point (3 1/2) where you ask or cue again.

LOL... It's like my son... I'll count to 3 and it's not until I actually hit 3 does he do what I want him to. If I'm really upset and mean business with my son I WON'T count, I'll just get after him, he know's I mean business so he responds like I wanted in the first place.

Horses are like kids sometimes...They wait until you mean business.

Evaluate HOW you are asking and what you do right before She moves.
The horse has picked up the "go" cue from something other than your voice. I'm guessing the way you sit in your saddle when you are finally tired of waiting.

I'd try cueing the walk from a stand still with a bump from your leg or spur with a seat cue all at the same time. Try it like you mean business. Maybe just counting to 1. Good Luck!
     
    10-24-2008, 11:19 AM
  #5
Showing
I employ an ask, tell, demand system.
First, you "ask" nicely, with light pressure. (eg, if asking for the horse to move forward, squeeze with your calf, rock your seat slightly forward, and ask with your voice.)
If there is no response, you "tell" with a more aggression. (eg, bump with your calf, become more aggressive with your voice.)
If there is still no response, let all heck break loose, MAKE the horse respond. (eg, bump with the spur, smack with the whip.)
This system makes them learn that a quick response means they don't get a more agressive rider.
     
    10-24-2008, 02:45 PM
  #6
Yearling
Just adding that the system JDI recommends is what my old stables uses for lesson horses. Of course they want to be lazy, so I would always do lots of transitions in my warm-ups and not tolerate a slow one. I would proceed squeeze - nudge/kick - tap with crop if an aid did not get a good and appropriately timed response.

Basically, my instructors would keep me at transitions until I was getting them as soon as I asked and going at a decent pace rather than lumping into a slow trot or using canter > trot as an excuse to slow riiiight down. So I got used to waking the horse up quickly and not letting them take the mickey!

As the others have said - you've got to train her out of responding three seconds later and into responding as soon as the aid is given.
     
    10-24-2008, 10:54 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
I employ an ask, tell, demand system.
First, you "ask" nicely, with light pressure. (eg, if asking for the horse to move forward, squeeze with your calf, rock your seat slightly forward, and ask with your voice.)
If there is no response, you "tell" with a more aggression. (eg, bump with your calf, become more aggressive with your voice.)
If there is still no response, let all heck break loose, MAKE the horse respond. (eg, bump with the spur, smack with the whip.)
This system makes them learn that a quick response means they don't get a more agressive rider.
This is exactly what I do and its the best training method out there. Horse and rider should be a partnership...however there is a point where you must DEMAND obediance/submissioon....

After some training the horse will go with a light asking and will be more willing to work with you when they realize
     
    10-25-2008, 02:53 PM
  #8
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by equineangel91    
This is exactly what I do and its the best training method out there. Horse and rider should be a partnership...however there is a point where you must DEMAND obediance/submissioon....

After some training the horse will go with a light asking and will be more willing to work with you when they realize
Thanks! It's a very common method - for good reason... it gets results!

Oh, just to add.... make sure you follow through with the 3 steps! Don't go straight from ask to demand, that's not fair to the horse... likewise, don't just go straight to Demand, even though it's tempting sometimes... if you follow all 3 steps every time, the horse should respond to a light aid.
     
    10-26-2008, 11:32 PM
  #9
HTS
Foal
"What is doubling back?"
Sorry, my shorthand for asking the horse for lots of changes in direction and speed in quick succession. They have to wake up up because you keep asking them to do things, as opposed to doing 5 laps of an arena at a trot then change. The idea is to ask for a change every few meters or steps. Only do this for a few minutes at the start of a session or when the horse's mind begins to wander. It's a focus tool.

The ask tell demand system sounds great too.
     
    10-26-2008, 11:36 PM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    

Thanks! It's a very common method - for good reason... it gets results!

Oh, just to add.... make sure you follow through with the 3 steps! Don't go straight from ask to demand, that's not fair to the horse... likewise, don't just go straight to Demand, even though it's tempting sometimes... if you follow all 3 steps every time, the horse should respond to a light aid.
I agree, this system works really really well.
     

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