Establishing Trust and a better bond with your horse
   

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Establishing Trust and a better bond with your horse

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  • Going bareback long distance cynthia royale
  • Did cynthia royals rituals workforyourhorse

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    06-25-2013, 06:28 PM
  #1
Foal
Establishing Trust and a better bond with your horse

I was brought up in the english world of riding where you did whatever your trainer said and didn't argue with that . The only way to train a horse was by lunging, and many hours in the saddle. If the horse didn't listen, bring out the whip or buy a new bridle and try a new bit. These methods may work just fine but I never felt connected to those horses I would ride. That's when I started learning natural horsemanship methods such as clinton anderson and parelli. I learned a few things that I still hold on to today but it just wasn't for me.

I went to California and discovered a trainer named Cynthia Royal. She is the owner of one of the doubles of Shadowfax aka 'Blanco' from The Lord of The Rings. She works with high sprited stallions and even has a PMU horse that was rescued. Everything she does is at liberty. The horse has a choice on whether or not he wants to participate. That is the most important part of the training. You only interact with the horse when he is ready. If the horse is acting spirited one day, you let him run around and don't try to engage in a relationship until his energy goes down a bit. Don't chase him, just wait for him to come back to you.
If you take the time to listen and feel what your horse is telling you, things will come a lot easier.

The major aspects in her training (some of it also comes from natural horsemanship methods):
Friendship Rituals
1. Shared Space- just spending time in the arena or pasture with your horse. No interaction. Focus on something other than horse. It then leads to petting and massaging your horse in his favorite spots as a treat.
2.Horse Handshake- putting your hand out letting the horse touch and smell with his nose. That is all. Resist temptations to pet your horse
Leadership Rituals
1. Taking Territory- This is the part where you establish a dominant yet nurturing role. It will help with aggressive, pushy or disrespectful horses

There are much more details and steps that go into it but I wanted to give you an introduction. The end result is a horse that you will be able to ride bareback and bridleless if you wanted. I never have to use a roundpen anymore and he comes when I call. It won't happen overnight, any kind of training takes time.

I pretty much just wanted to let everyone out there know that you don't have to settle for methods you are not happy with even if it is what everyone else does. I'm not saying anyone has to convert to Cynthia Royals method. It has helped me out a lot but it might not work for you. Just follow what you believe in.
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    06-25-2013, 07:15 PM
  #2
Foal
Hmmm. I'm naturally skeptical of these methods, but if it works for her.. It works. Definitely not my cup of tea. All my ranch horses don't mind me being around and working for me, but they also aren't my pets. I don't care much for an intimate bond, just a good working partner.
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    06-25-2013, 07:42 PM
  #3
Showing
1. Taking Territory-

And what does that entail exactly?
     
    06-25-2013, 08:17 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
1. Taking Territory-

And what does that entail exactly?
I didn't put much detail cause its a long explanation. It may seem kind of odd at first but it works. The best example I can give you is when it comes to feeding time. It can be done in a stall or arena. The method is adjusted slightly for either one. I'll give you the arena example.

So first you would put out a feed bucket in the arena. Let the horse go to it. From a moderate distance you would circle around the horse. If he is paying attention to you he will turn his body to face you as you go around(this is the end result). Most likely he won't at first which is okay. Once you get to the hind end you would run up making any noise and startle the horse (obviously keeping a safe distance). She also uses a grass reed instead of any whips as an extension of your hand (they are very flimsy). As you come up from behind wiggle the stick a little and tap a little in between the legs if needed. You try not to touch the horse though. Most horses will move out of the way. At first the horse will be like what the heck just happened. He may try to come back to the food or just run around. If he tried to come in, you drive him out. You wait until he stands calmly. Then walk to him, do the horse handshake and immediately bring him back to the food. This is repeated on both sides of the horse until he is following your movement. It doesn't take very long.

In the end you will be able to have a horse that walks in sync with you and will willingly come off the food without aggression.
It's kind of like how a lead mare would claim something and make another lower ranking horse move away, except the difference here is that you are taking something and immediately giving it back once you see a desired behavior.
     
    06-25-2013, 09:05 PM
  #5
Super Moderator
While you are doing these trainings, have you also been riding your horse, or does that only come after the training, or when?
     
    06-25-2013, 10:05 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
while you are doing these trainings, have you also been riding your horse, or does that only come after the training, or when?
You could still ride your horse during the training but there is a chance it could interfere. I am doing this with a yearling and a 4 year old TB. I just started the older TB with this method and I won't be riding him for about a month or two. The yearling is complete but I obviously can't ride him yet. I am a strong believer on doing groundwork before getting in the saddle. The point is to develop certain skills and cues on the ground then transfer them into riding. That is how you are able to get on a horse and ride without a bit, bridle or saddle.
     
    06-25-2013, 10:21 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by trackstar    
I didn't put much detail cause its a long explanation. It may seem kind of odd at first but it works. The best example I can give you is when it comes to feeding time. It can be done in a stall or arena. The method is adjusted slightly for either one. I'll give you the arena example.

So first you would put out a feed bucket in the arena. Let the horse go to it. From a moderate distance you would circle around the horse. If he is paying attention to you he will turn his body to face you as you go around(this is the end result). Most likely he won't at first which is okay. Once you get to the hind end you would run up making any noise and startle the horse (obviously keeping a safe distance). She also uses a grass reed instead of any whips as an extension of your hand (they are very flimsy). As you come up from behind wiggle the stick a little and tap a little in between the legs if needed. You try not to touch the horse though. Most horses will move out of the way. At first the horse will be like what the heck just happened. He may try to come back to the food or just run around. If he tried to come in, you drive him out. You wait until he stands calmly. Then walk to him, do the horse handshake and immediately bring him back to the food. This is repeated on both sides of the horse until he is following your movement. It doesn't take very long.

In the end you will be able to have a horse that walks in sync with you and will willingly come off the food without aggression.
It's kind of like how a lead mare would claim something and make another lower ranking horse move away, except the difference here is that you are taking something and immediately giving it back once you see a desired behavior.
Sounds like an effective way to get kicked in the noggin. Does she do this with already broke horses? Or unhandled colts?

Maybe I've been in the sticks to long, but it sounds rather odd.
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    06-25-2013, 10:23 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by trackstar    
You could still ride your horse during the training but there is a chance it could interfere. I am doing this with a yearling and a 4 year old TB. I just started the older TB with this method and I won't be riding him for about a month or two. The yearling is complete but I obviously can't ride him yet. I am a strong believer on doing groundwork before getting in the saddle. The point is to develop certain skills and cues on the ground then transfer them into riding. That is how you are able to get on a horse and ride without a bit, bridle or saddle.
So, after doing this ladies method, you can get on and ride bareback and bridle-less immediately? Or do you train with a saddle and bridle and then transfer?

Almost all of my horses ride bridle-less and bareback if asked, but only after being worked under saddle thoroughly first.
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    06-25-2013, 10:54 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by MustangGirl    
So, after doing this ladies method, you can get on and ride bareback and bridle-less immediately? Or do you train with a saddle and bridle and then transfer?

Almost all of my horses ride bridle-less and bareback if asked, but only after being worked under saddle thoroughly first.
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You don't get close enough to get kicked. Most horses will move away before you get that close.But that is only a small part of the training. Theres a lot more to it.. She has worked with unbroke stallions, geldings and mares of different ages.. You can transfer immediately to bareback and bridle-less. These horses never see a bit or bridle. Some of her method comes from modified classical dressage training.
     
    06-25-2013, 11:08 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by trackstar    
You don't get close enough to get kicked. Most horses will move away before you get that close.But that is only a small part of the training. Theres a lot more to it.. She has worked with unbroke stallions, geldings and mares of different ages.. You can transfer immediately to bareback and bridle-less. These horses never see a bit or bridle. Some of her method comes from modified classical dressage training.
Hmm. Guess I would have to see it to believe it.
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