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Extremly aggressive horse

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  • Amazing changes in a horse
  • David archer aggressivi hors

 
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    06-03-2010, 04:34 PM
  #11
Foal
Well, you certainly have a time on your hands. I've worked with the trainer in the below videos. He does a lot of work rehabing rescue horses out here, and I've seen some amazing changes in horses through his work. He has over 200 videos on YouTube, some of which may really help you. The videos about Hawk the Mustang are about getting an untouched mustang to allow touch and ultimately to be rideable. Good luck!

YouTube - david12000000's Channel

http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=david12000000#p/u/52/AkoWmQc-Z40
     
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    06-03-2010, 04:38 PM
  #12
Yearling
As I said, your heart is in the right place. I understand that conditions in Romania may not be the same as in Canada.

If your bound a determined to try then get that fellow to stop bugging him and forget putting a bit in his mouth! Just pile the food in front of him and talk to him. Judging by those video's his stress levels are pretty high. Get a chair and sit where you're safe and talk..... read to him.... anything so that he gets it into his head your not going to cause him anymore stress. Don't force yourself on him until he's gelded.

My first concern is that once he's gelded he is not going to be able to move around and that in itself could lead to problems with his recovery. Swelling is often relieved by exercise, how are you going to deal with that?
     
    06-03-2010, 04:39 PM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alicia    
Is there any way you could build him an enclosure to walk around in, instead of being tied. That alone sounds frustrating for him, and no way to expend all his excess energy.
However sometimes we all have the best intentions and need to work with what we got.
I would use a sedative to work with the necessary (feet trimming and getting him gelded). Also I would leave him alone and not try touching him just yet. I would have him in an area that has people around alot but noone paying too much attention to him. The idea being him accepting people in his space and them not doing anything with him. I would also have someone (a person) just sitting in the stall next to him (out of harms way). Again this way he gets used to the smell and sight of people without them touching him or getting in his space. Hopefully he will get the idea that people around doesn't have to equal him needing to be aggressive or protective of himself.
I also agree with Beling - be consistent, feeding at the same time, handling him on the same side, having his food and water at the same location, ect.. Having consistency and a routine may help him feel more stable and safe and his environment then is predictable.
Could you also have a very calm horse or some other animal in a stall close to him for the animal confort and that way he's never alone?
When it comes to touching him I would use a glove tied to a stick or whip (or something to act as an extesion of your arm). That way he can bite and kick that instead of someone possibly getting hurt. I would only do the touching for very short periods of time (5 min a day a couple of times a day or something), and then build on that.
Also, in my opinion, restraining the horse to accept human touch seems a little unnecessary. I think if you work within his comfort zone (using some of the ideas I previously suggested) you will end up with more positive results.
Best of luck
Thank you for your advice. I really like your approach and I think that this will be a way to go. I will try this. The idea with people standing next to him without doing him a thing is great for the moment. Maybe in this way he'll understand that people are not there to beat him up. Unfortunately he can't stand to have a horse near him. He tries his best to kill the other horse, even if the horse is calm and non aggressive. Guess that he's not very used with other horses, or he's very dominant. We have a lot of mares in heat now so maybe he feels their smell and he's very protective with his territory.
     
    06-03-2010, 04:40 PM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alicia    
I would also have someone (a person) just sitting in the stall next to him (out of harms way). Again this way he gets used to the smell and sight of people without them touching him or getting in his space. Hopefully he will get the idea that people around doesn't have to equal him needing to be aggressive or protective of himself.

Best of luck
We posted at the same time and seem to be on the same wave length....
     
    06-03-2010, 04:45 PM
  #15
Weanling
Well we are Canadian...eh?
     
    06-03-2010, 04:47 PM
  #16
Weanling
Good on you,****edEvans, for taking him in and wanting to help him, there are very few of your kind around these days.
Hopefully once you get him gelded, some of these issues will be much easier to work out.
Keep us posted
     
    06-03-2010, 04:49 PM
  #17
Weanling
G and K's Mom : Well, we tried to put a bit in his mouth in order to get him used to it. He is definitely used to a bit and with driving, but I don't understand how someone was able to put a bridle on him in a safe way. If he is bridled you have more control over him, a bridle and two people holding him. If he will be gelded that will be the only solution for him to do his daily exercises. We hope that after the gelding operation he will calm down because for now he is aggressive and stressed up because of the mares. I know that even after he will be gelded he will still be aggressive but we hope that not as much as today.

CanyonCowboy : Oh, I love David Archer. You are very very lucky to had the opportunity to work with him. He has such a great method of working with the horses. I think that the case with Pepper the aggressive horse is similar to Calin's case. And this gives me hope. To bad that we don't have access to such a trainer out here.
     
    06-03-2010, 05:08 PM
  #18
Yearling
Well you sure have your hands full.

PLEASE keep us updated.......
     
    06-03-2010, 05:30 PM
  #19
Foal
My hats off to you and that young man! I can tell you that The current situation is extremely dangerous for both the human and the horse.The odds are pretty high that one or both will get hurt sooner or later.

If you look at the risks involved and the extremely small chance that this horse will change I don't think the possibility for a good outcome is there.

Gelding him probably won't make much difference in his way of thinking and frankly speaking I don't see the skills required to change things in the young man. He is surely brave and his heart is in the right place but it comes down to experience and expertise and for sure that horse needs a handful of both.

Think about this and make sure that your time, resources and funds are being well spent with this guy. I am sure all of the above are limited and perhaps allocating them to some other horse who has a better chance of adapting to the human world would be more prudent.

If you choose to stay wth it good luck and God bless.
     
    06-03-2010, 05:50 PM
  #20
Weanling
5cuetrain : I understand your opinion here, and to some extent I agree with you. The horse is very very dangerous and almost impossible to handle. I don't even want to imagine how it will be if the horse will escape. For this reason we tie the horse with two halters and two lead ropes. The possibility of him being in danger and couldn't escape is smaller than the possibility of him escaping and injure or even kill someone.

We have an experienced horsemen available, I really trust him to train this horse. The person that is dealing with the horse in the video has a lot of experience but is still young and to brave for his own safety. But he and the other person that I'm talking about are the only one that can handle the horse. With a lot of risks that's true but it's their choice to do so.

And if you saw some of my posts you will understand that the rescue center is notorious for dealing with hopeless chases. We have a management (administration) that want to be heroic all the time. They are against euthanasia (they agree with it only in limit cases) and they want to give a chance to all the horses. It doesn't depends if their chances of survival or rehabilitation are very limited. And I can't fight with them. I only try to help with what I can, considering that I'm not very experienced myself. And I always try to find second opinions.
     

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